Stories

Backward people ।। Covid-19 and small ethnic groups in Bangladesh

Dhaka, Bangladesh Social February 5 @ 9:18am

When the global crisis epidemic coronavirus hit Bangladesh in late March last year, At that time, we had to worry about its impact on small ethnic groups.

This is because these groups have been fighting for their socio-economic, political and cultural rights for a long time.

Bangladesh is home to more than 50 ethnic minorities.

They live mainly in the plains of the country and in the south-east known as the Chittagong Hill Tracts (CHT).


When the global crisis epidemic coronavirus hit Bangladesh in late March last year, At that time, we had to worry about its impact on small ethnic groups.

This is because these groups have been fighting for their socio-economic, political and cultural rights for a long time.

Bangladesh is home to more than 50 ethnic minorities.

They live mainly in the plains of the country and in the south-east known as the Chittagong Hill Tracts (CHT).



These people from different communities have their own language, culture and traditions.

Of the total population of the country One to two percent of the people in these communities.

As a minority, these people of small ethnic groups have long been mainstream Socioeconomic development is isolated from the benefits of the system.

A recent study by the Bangladesh Institute of Development Studies and the ILO found that

Minorities are below the national average in various socio-economic indicators such as health, education, household-based income, food intake, participation and women's empowerment.


For example: While the national average poverty rate in the country is 20.5 percent, it is even higher in the case of small ethnic groups.

Living on flat land Poverty rate for small ethnic groups is 80 percent and for small ethnic groups living in the CHT. Poverty rate is 65 percent.

For various reasons, these people belonging to the country's small ethnic groups are living in a state of perpetual marginalization and poverty.

Conflicts, land grabbing, climate change, various developmental interventions and the increasing displacement of land and resources due to conventional systemic inequalities have put the lives and livelihoods of people belonging to small ethnic groups at great risk.



As the government announced a nationwide shutdown to prevent coronavirus infection, the immediate socio-economic impact was felt by people belonging to small ethnic groups.

A recent study of the effects of epidemics on small ethnic groups found that,

Thousands of garment workers and parlor workers have lost their jobs.

Agricultural production has been disrupted,
Small businesses continue to fight for survival,
Access to regular health care and education has been disrupted, Violations of the rights of small ethnic groups have increased and the most worrying is.

Minority ethnic communities are facing food insecurity.


For example: Dinajpur and Netrokona Distract at Hajong families used to eat the same amount of food every day, Now it has to be reduced. People from small ethnic groups who used to work elsewhere have now returned to their villages At present they have no income. They need employment to survive. They are now desperate for employment.

The government has taken various policy measures including social security and other assistance programs for the low-income and marginalized people in the Covid-19 crisis.

However, taking part in the study Most people from small ethnic groups say, they have received little or no assistance through these government programs.


The digital education service that the government has taken up through Parliament


TV and YouTube during the Corona period, Hundreds of students from marginalized ethnic groups are being deprived of that service due to lack of digital devices.

In the case of education of children of small ethnic groups in the plains and hills Linguistic barriers are at the top of such challenges,

There is also a lack of adequate IT equipment, internet connection and occasional power.

It is important for the ‘Covid-19 and the small ethnic group to return to normalcy’, and for this, everyone must work together out of a sense of social responsibility.


These ethnic minorities have been showing interest in returning to normalcy, so the state has a responsibility to protect them.

So, not only in the short term to deal with the epidemic, Rather that the conventional system, structural socioeconomic, Political and cultural barriers continue to marginalize ethnic minorities, It is very important for the Government of Bangladesh to print them and their needs and priorities.




IMAGE :: INTERNET ##
Need Help?
Johnson

Johnson Tamlyn

Production Manager

Johnson is available 9:00-17:00 GMT Mon‑Fri, or by email 24/7