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Christina Noriega

Bogota, Colombia
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About Christina
I'm a freelance journalist, based in Bogotá, Colombia. I cover human rights, gender equality, social movements, culture and the environment. My work has appeared in The Guardian, Al Jazeera, Vice, NACLA, Women's Media Center, Remezcla and more. 

As a Texas-born Colombian-American, I strive to build bridges between communities through journalism. While my early work shined a light on the U.S. Latinx community, I focus today on bringing news from Colombia, my family's homeland, to English-speaking audiences abroad.
Languages
English Spanish
Services
Video Package (Web / Broadcast) Documentaries News Gathering
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Skills
Politics Current Affairs Science & Environment
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Portfolio

Forced from home, these Colombians struggle to live in a basketball stadium

10 Apr 2024  |  www.aljazeera.com
Consuelo Manyoma and her family, along with other residents of San Isidro, an Afro-Colombian village, have been displaced due to the presence of drug traffickers and resulting violence. They have been living in the Crystal Coliseum, a sports arena turned emergency shelter in Buenaventura, for two years, after fleeing their homes due to gunfights, an imposed curfew, and the disappearance of a villager. The community is struggling to live in limbo, waiting for a peace that remains elusive.

Hey, guys, wanna know how to diaper a baby or make a ponytail? Try the School for Men

23 Feb 2024  |  www.kaxe.org
In Bogotá, Colombia, the Care School for Men, an innovative city-led program, teaches men caregiving and household skills to address gender inequality. The program, initiated during the COVID-19 pandemic, has seen increasing participation and aims to transform societal attitudes towards caregiving. It offers workshops on tasks like changing diapers and styling hair, paired with discussions on defying gender norms. The initiative has positively impacted participants, improving family relationships and promoting gender equality. The program's long-term goal is to cover 40% of Bogotá's male population, supported by the city's new mayor, Carlos Galán.

Hey, guys, wanna know how to diaper a baby or make a ponytail? Try the School for Men

23 Feb 2024  |  WQLN
At Bogotá's Care School for Men, an innovative city-led program, men learn essential caregiving and household skills to address gender inequality in unpaid caregiving. The program, initiated during the COVID-19 pandemic, offers workshops and longer courses to teach men tasks like changing diapers and styling hair, while also challenging traditional gender norms. Since its inception in 2021, the program has seen increasing participation and aims to transform societal attitudes towards caregiving. The initiative has garnered support from Bogotá's new mayor and experts who emphasize the need for public policy and workplace culture changes to achieve broader gender equality.

Hey, guys, wanna know how to diaper a baby or make a ponytail? Try the School for Men

23 Feb 2024  |  www.whqr.org
In Bogotá, Colombia, the Care School for Men, an innovative city-led program, teaches men caregiving and household skills to address gender inequality. The program, initiated during the COVID-19 pandemic, offers workshops on tasks like changing diapers and styling hair, aiming to shift societal norms and reduce the domestic gender gap. Since its inception in 2021, the program has seen increasing participation, with over 7,300 men attending in-person classes and 50,000 completing the online course. The initiative is supported by Bogotá's new mayor, Carlos Galán, and aims to transform societal attitudes towards caregiving over the next six years. Participants, like Ferley Sáenz, report improved family relationships and personal growth, while experts emphasize the need for public policy and workplace culture changes to achieve broader gender equality.

Hey, guys, wanna know how to diaper a baby or make a ponytail? Try the School for Men

23 Feb 2024  |  WXPR
Bogotá's Care School for Men, a city-led program, teaches men to share in housework and child care, challenging traditional gender roles. The program, which began during the COVID-19 pandemic, offers workshops on basic caregiving and household skills. It has gained traction, with 7,300 men attending in-person classes and 50,000 completing the online course. The initiative aims to address the domestic gender gap, as women in Bogotá spend over twice as much time on unpaid work as men. The program's success stories include men like Ferley Sáenz, who improved his relationship with his family. The city plans to expand the program's reach, with support from the new mayor, Carlos Galán.

Hey, guys, wanna know how to diaper a baby or make a ponytail? Try the School for Men

23 Feb 2024  |  www.wuwm.com
Bogotá's Care School for Men, a city-led program, teaches men caregiving and household skills to address gender inequality in unpaid work. The program, which began in 2021, offers workshops and longer courses to men of all ages, challenging traditional gender roles and societal expectations. Participation has increased, with thousands attending in-person and online classes. The program aims to transform societal attitudes and expand its reach, with support from the new mayor, Carlos Galán. Success stories from participants like Ferley Sáenz highlight the program's positive impact on family dynamics.

Why Latin America’s ‘pink tide’ is taking a stand against Israel

09 Nov 2023  |  www.aljazeera.com
Latin America's leftist leaders, part of the 'pink tide', have taken a strong stance against Israel's actions in Gaza, with countries like Bolivia, Colombia, and Chile recalling diplomats and severing ties. This marks a significant divergence from other Western nations' more cautious responses. Historical ties, Cold War legacies, and shared experiences of displacement and colonialism influence this solidarity with the Palestinian cause. However, these actions may have political and economic repercussions, particularly in relations with Israel and its defense exports. The diplomatic moves also aim to pressure the US to call for a ceasefire.

Could Venezuela’s diaspora hold the key to its opposition primary race?

20 Oct 2023  |  www.aljazeera.com
The Venezuelan diaspora, which includes over 7.7 million people, may play a decisive role in the opposition primary to select a candidate to challenge President Nicolas Maduro in the 2024 general elections. For the first time, diaspora Venezuelans like Gisela Serrano, a migrant rights activist, will be able to vote in a presidential primary. The National Primary Commission has facilitated this by setting up polling sites internationally and updating voter rolls. Despite challenges such as diplomatic tensions and legal residence requirements, the diaspora's vote is seen as crucial, especially as the US eases sanctions following Venezuela's pledge to allow fair elections. However, concerns remain over the exclusion of banned candidates like primary frontrunner Maria Corina Machado from the general elections.

The secret to Colombia’s drop in deforestation? Armed groups

22 Aug 2023  |  www.aljazeera.com
Colombia's deforestation rates have dropped to the lowest level in nearly a decade, a development hailed as a victory for President Gustavo Petro. However, experts attribute this decline partly to armed rebel groups, particularly the Estado Mayor Central (EMC), which have banned illegal logging to strengthen their position in peace negotiations with the government. The EMC emerged from the disbanded FARC and has significant control over parts of the Amazon, where they have imposed sanctions and rules against deforestation. While the government's efforts focus on creating economic alternatives and seeking international financial support for conservation, the EMC's actions have led to a significant decrease in deforestation, especially in regions under their control. However, there are concerns that reliance on the EMC for environmental regulation could be problematic if negotiations falter. Amidst this, local communities have also initiated their own bans on deforestation, seeking government support and investment in rural areas.

Colombia’s Own Black Lives Matter Movement

16 Jun 2023  |  Huck
The article discusses the anti-racism protests in Colombia, drawing parallels with the Black Lives Matter movement in the United States. It highlights the case of Anderson Arboleda, a young Black man killed by police, which sparked protests in Colombia against police brutality and systemic racism. The article features comments from activists and notes the lack of media coverage on such incidents. It also touches on the historical context of racial discrimination in Colombia, mentioning a law passed in 2011 against discrimination and the challenges in enforcing it. The piece further explores the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on Afro-Colombian communities, particularly in the Pacific Coast region, and the ongoing violence against Black community leaders. The article concludes with the need for sustained attention and action on the issue of Black rights in Colombia.

Civilians face heightened danger from Colombia’s landmines

22 Feb 2023  |  www.aljazeera.com
Colombia faces a growing threat from landmines as armed groups proliferate and expand, putting civilians at increased risk. Despite significant progress in de-mining efforts, the ongoing conflict and the use of landmines by non-state armed groups have hindered the country's goal of being mine-free by 2025. The situation has led to a rise in civilian casualties and displacement, with rural communities particularly affected. The government, under President Gustavo Petro's 'Total Peace' strategy, aims to negotiate an end to the conflict and dismantle armed groups, but the success of these efforts remains uncertain.

Wind Power's Promise and Peril in Colombia's La Guajira

14 Feb 2023  |  NACLA
In La Guajira, Colombia, the wind energy industry is expanding with 60 projects planned, mostly on Indigenous Wayuu land. While wind power offers a clean energy source and potential local benefits, there are concerns about the impact on Indigenous rights and the adequacy of consultation processes. The Wayuu, who have lived in the region for over a millennium, face challenges from multinational corporations that have historically failed to bring long-term development and have been accused of inadequate consultations. The article discusses the potential for wind power to provide up to 20% of Colombia's electricity needs, the risks of Indigenous displacement, and the need for fair compensation and legal assistance for the Wayuu. It also highlights the poverty and corruption in La Guajira, the importance of respecting cultural values, and the potential for community-owned wind farm models as seen in other countries.

Colombia’s Radical New Approach to Cocaine

30 Oct 2022  |  Foreign Policy
Colombia, under President Gustavo Petro, is shifting its drug policy to focus on rural development and coca substitution, moving away from criminalization and forced eradication. Petro's strategy aims to address the root causes of coca cultivation by investing in alternative crops and supporting rural communities. Despite past failures in similar programs, there is cautious optimism among coca farmers. The new approach includes potential decriminalization of the coca leaf and a focus on human rights over criminal justice. However, challenges remain, including securing funding and overcoming both domestic and international opposition to drug legalization.

Indigenous Women Keep Fighting For Their Land Rights — Against All Odds

01 Oct 2022  |  refinery29.com
Indigenous women across Latin America continue to lead the defense of their ancestral lands against extractivism, illegal land seizures, and colonial legacies, advocating for autonomy and control. They view the land as integral to their identity and existence. Notable activists include Sara Omi, the first Embera lawyer in Panama, who fights against deforestation; Alexandra Narvaez, the first female A’i Kofan Indigenous Guard in Ecuador, who won the Goldman Prize for environmental activism; Ediana Montiel, a Wayuu activist in Colombia, who opposes extractivist projects; and Miryam Vargas, a Nahua community radio journalist in Mexico, who is part of a movement against the Morelos Integral Project threatening water and food sovereignty.

Colombia Truth Commission presents final report on civil conflict

29 Jun 2022  |  www.aljazeera.com
Colombia's Truth Commission has released its final report on the country's civil conflict, revealing that at least 450,664 people were killed between 1985 and 2018. The report calls for substantial reforms, particularly in drug policy, and urges redress for victims. It is a result of the 2016 peace deal with FARC and highlights the need to address impunity and fully implement the peace deal. The report comes at a time of renewed violence in Colombia, and its recommendations are seen as a potential path to peace, especially with the upcoming new government led by President-elect Gustavo Petro, who supports the peace deal.

From masked protests to the ballot box: Colombians shake up elections

17 Jun 2022  |  The Christian Science Monitor
Colombians, driven by last year's mass protests, are participating in elections in unprecedented numbers, seeking change through the ballot box. The upcoming presidential runoff features two anti-establishment candidates, Gustavo Petro and Rodolfo Hernández, both promising a break from traditional politics. The protests, initially sparked by a proposed tax reform, highlighted deep-seated issues like poverty and inequality, leading to a political awakening among many, especially the youth. The article underscores the shift from street protests to electoral participation as a means to achieve social change.

Deforesting the Colombian Amazon as a Way of Life

05 Jun 2022  |  El País México
In the Colombian Amazon, deforestation is a way of life for many farmers who rely on burning forests to clear land for agriculture and cattle grazing. Despite the environmental damage, they see no alternatives for survival. The article highlights the historical context of land colonization, the impact of the Peace Agreement with FARC, and the government's repressive measures against deforestation. It also discusses the role of local communities and organizations in managing environmental issues and the challenges they face.

Even if She Doesn’t Become President of Colombia, Francia Márquez Has Already Won

13 Mar 2022  |  www.refinery29.com
Francia Márquez, an Afro-Colombian activist and environmentalist, is a prominent candidate in Colombia's presidential race, advocating for peace, economic equality, land rights, and gender equality. Despite facing significant challenges, including threats to her life, Márquez has garnered substantial support, particularly among marginalized communities. Her campaign, rooted in grassroots activism and the political movement 'Soy Porque Somos,' aims to address the grievances of Colombia's poor, Black, and Indigenous populations. Regardless of the election outcome, Márquez's candidacy represents a significant shift in Colombian politics, challenging entrenched racism and promoting gender equality.

Even if She Doesn’t Become President of Colombia, Francia Márquez Has Already Won

01 Mar 2022  |  www.refinery29.com
Francia Márquez, an Afro-Colombian activist and environmentalist, is a prominent candidate in Colombia's presidential race, advocating for peace, economic equality, land rights, and gender equality. Despite facing significant challenges, including threats to her life, Márquez has garnered substantial support, particularly from marginalized communities. Her campaign, rooted in grassroots activism and the political movement 'Soy Porque Somos,' aims to address the grievances of Colombia's poor, Black, and Indigenous populations. Regardless of the election outcome, Márquez's candidacy sets a significant precedent for Colombia, highlighting the country's ongoing struggles with racism and gender inequality.

Colombia’s new anti-deforestation law provokes concern for small-scale farmers

01 Jan 2022  |  Mongabay Environmental News
Colombia's new anti-deforestation law, enacted in August 2021, has sparked concerns among environmentalists, human rights activists, and smallholder farmers. The law introduces harsher penalties for environmental crimes and aims to combat deforestation through measures like Operation Artemis. Critics argue that the law may disproportionately target poor farmers rather than the financiers of deforestation. The debate centers on the effectiveness of the law in addressing deforestation while ensuring justice for marginalized communities. Key figures express concerns about the law's implementation and its potential impact on small-scale farmers and Indigenous communities.

A Colombian Drug Lord’s Victims Protest His Extradition to the U.S.

08 Nov 2021  |  World Politics Review
Dairo Antonio Usuga, also known as 'Otoniel,' Colombia's most-wanted drug lord and head of the Clan del Golfo cartel, is expected to be extradited to the United States within five weeks on drug trafficking charges. His cartel is responsible for processing and shipping over 160 tons of cocaine annually to the U.S. and Europe, and for imposing terror and violence over Colombian territories.

Indigenous artists use rap to push for change in Colombia

11 Oct 2021  |  www.aljazeera.com
Indigenous Embera artists in Colombia are using rap music as a platform to voice their struggles and demand change. The Embera, facing displacement due to economic hardships exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic and ongoing violence, have found rap an effective medium to share their stories and seek representation. Artists like the Queragama brothers and Gloria Patricia Ahise are creating music that speaks to their cultural heritage and experiences of displacement, while also addressing broader social issues such as gender-based violence. Despite a 2016 peace deal, many Indigenous communities have not found peace, and the government's efforts to provide aid and security have been met with skepticism by those who fear returning to their traditional lands.

The Indigenous Women of Mujeres Amazónicas Put Their Bodies on the Line to Protect the Land

01 Oct 2021  |  www.refinery29.com
Mujeres Amazónicas, a collective of about 100 Indigenous women in Ecuador, has been actively resisting oil extraction on Indigenous lands and combating gender violence for nearly a decade. Co-founder Patricia Gualinga describes their unwavering stance against industry and government pressures. The group's efforts include a historic march to Quito in 2013 and a legal victory at the Inter-American Court on Human Rights against the Argentine oil company CGC. Despite Ecuador's economic dependence on oil, Mujeres Amazónicas promotes the 'Living Forest' concept and has faced threats, including a 2018 attack on Gualinga. Their activism continues amid challenges, advocating for investigations into gender-based violence and empowering women through workshops and healing circles.

Valentine’s Day Is Made Possible Thanks to Colombian Flower Workers

12 Feb 2021  |  teenvogue.com
Colombian flower workers, predominantly female, endure up to 100-hour workweeks with low pay and poor conditions to meet the demand for Valentine's Day flowers in the U.S. Despite Colombia's $1.5 billion in annual flower exports, workers face health issues like carpal tunnel syndrome and lack of union representation. Studies reveal excessive work hours, health deterioration, sexual harassment, and pregnancy discrimination. International groups and union activists campaign for recognition and improved conditions, with February 14 marked as Flower Workers' Day to protest and raise awareness.

Armed groups target Colombia's children as reform process slows

09 Nov 2020  |  www.theguardian.com
In Colombia, armed groups are exploiting the COVID-19 pandemic to increase their recruitment of children, particularly in impoverished areas with limited access to basic services. The pandemic has closed schools and worsened living conditions, leading to a spike in child recruitment rates. Communities are protesting in Bogotá, demanding government action against the violence and the implementation of rural reforms promised in the peace deal. Despite a new government plan to address child recruitment, many believe the government is not doing enough to protect their children. The situation is dire in the north of Cauca, where families like that of Luis Troches are being forced to flee due to the threat of their children being recruited by armed groups.

Armed groups target Colombia's children as reform process slows

09 Nov 2020  |  the Guardian
Armed groups in Colombia are increasingly targeting children for recruitment amid the COVID-19 pandemic, exploiting the closure of schools and worsening living conditions. The peace process has slowed, and the government is criticized for not implementing rural reforms and development measures. Protests have erupted in Bogotá, demanding stronger protection and better rural conditions. The pandemic has exacerbated the conflict, with armed groups offering financial incentives to lure children. A new government plan aims to address child recruitment, but many believe it is insufficient.

Colombia’s ‘false positives’ scandal: Victims accuse Montoya of mockery

15 Feb 2020  |  Al Jazeera
In Colombia, families of victims in the 'false positives' scandal, where the army killed civilians and presented them as enemy combatants, have accused former army chief Mario Montoya of withholding information during a peace tribunal hearing. Montoya was expected to provide new details about the scandal, which resulted in at least 2,248 civilian deaths. Rights groups and victims' families are seeking accountability and believe Montoya's testimony is crucial to understanding the extent of the military's crimes and the involvement of higher command levels, including former President Santos and Senator Uribe. Montoya initially remained silent but later provided vague answers and blamed the soldiers' poor backgrounds for the crimes. Victims' rights groups are urging the court to take action against Montoya's perceived delay tactics. The Special Peace Jurisdiction (JEP) is considering expelling Montoya from the tribunal or initiating a judicial procedure that could lead to a 20-year prison sentence.

Colombians Decry Censorship After Government Officials Paint Over Mural About Extrajudicial Killings

24 Oct 2019  |  hyperallergic.com
Colombians have expressed outrage on social media over the military's censorship of a mural in Bogotá that highlighted the role of generals in extrajudicial killings from 2000 to 2010. The mural, commissioned by human rights organizations and created by graffiti artists, was painted over by military officials who also intimidated the artists and issued a ticket for vandalism. The incident has sparked a viral campaign, with the original design being shared online, and has drawn criticism from Human Rights Watch. The military has not commented, and concerns for the safety of those involved persist.

FARC Combatants Hesitate to Give up on Peace

24 Sep 2019  |  latindispatch.com
Former FARC combatants in Colombia face a dilemma after a group of ex-commanders, including Iván Márquez, announced a return to armed struggle, citing the government's failure to implement the 2016 peace deal. Despite the call to rearm, the majority of ex-combatants, such as Gonzalo Beltrán, remain committed to peace, focusing on civilian projects like a clothing-manufacturing cooperative. The government's slow progress on reintegration and security has been criticized, and President Iván Duque's response includes a reward for information on the rebels and a commitment to ex-combatant reintegration. Analysts suggest that the rearmament announcement could pressure the government to fulfill its promises and prevent further ex-combatants from abandoning the peace process.

7 Latino-Focused Exhibitions to Check Out at Los Angeles’ Photoville

19 Apr 2019  |  Remezcla
Photoville, New York City's largest photo festival, is coming to Los Angeles, expecting to attract visitors with its free exhibits, talks, and workshops. The event will feature over 55 exhibits, including a retrospective of Estevan Oriol and Joseph Rodriguez's work, and will highlight Latinx and Latin American visual journalism. The festival aims to challenge the typical narratives of Latinx lives with nuanced reporting and storytelling.

Colombia false positive scandal: Families demand ‘greater truth’

19 Sep 2018  |  www.aljazeera.com
In Colombia, the military has been implicated in a human rights scandal known as 'false positives,' where civilians were lured, killed, and falsely reported as combat kills to inflate body counts in the war against the FARC. The scandal, which came to light in 2008, involved at least 2,248 extrajudicial killings from 1988 to 2014. In 2017, 21 military members were sentenced for their involvement in the killings. However, victims' families, including the Mothers of Soacha, are concerned that those convicted may receive lighter sentences or impunity through the Special Jurisdiction for Peace, a transitional justice system established under the 2016 peace deal. The families demand the full truth, including who ordered the killings, as the JEP begins to prioritize these cases. Human Rights Watch has expressed concerns about potential loopholes in the JEP that could allow senior officers to escape meaningful justice.

10 Latino-Focused Exhibitions to Check Out at Brooklyn’s Photoville

13 Sep 2018  |  remezcla.com
Brooklyn's Photoville features 10 Latino-focused exhibitions, highlighting issues such as the dangers faced by journalists in Mexico, the Zapatista movement in Chiapas, Latin American photography and illustration, gender norms, the colonial legacy in Puerto Rico, the immigrant experience in New York, the aftermath of conflict in Ayacucho, Peru, gentrification in Chicago's Pilsen neighborhood, and the global refugee crisis. The exhibitions are curated by various organizations and showcase the work of numerous photographers.

Everything You Need to Know About First Colombian Presidential Elections After Peace Deal

12 Jun 2018  |  Remezcla
The Colombian presidential elections post-peace deal are marked by polarization, with frontrunner Ivan Duque seeking to modify the peace accords and Gustavo Petro aiming to strengthen them. The elections saw the highest voter turnout since 1998, and for the first time, demobilized FARC combatants voted. Petro is the first leftist to reach the second round in modern Colombian history, but the left remains divided. Traditional political parties are losing ground to new movements, and the next vice president will be a woman. Colombian citizens in the US can vote if registered.

Remembering Laura Aguilar, the Chicana Who Photographed Marginalized Latinos

30 Apr 2018  |  remezcla.com
Chicana photographer Laura Aguilar, celebrated for her portrayal of underrepresented Latinx subjects, passed away at 58. Aguilar, a self-taught artist, used photography to communicate and represent Latinx, queer, and large-bodied individuals. Her work, particularly the series 'Latina Lesbians' and her self-portraits set against the Southwest's landscapes, provided visibility and a platform for queer women of color. Aguilar's photographs have been featured in significant exhibitions across the U.S., including a recent retrospective spanning her career from 1976 to 2007. Her legacy continues to influence discussions on Latinx identity and representation in art.

This Massive Zine Collection Is a History of Latin American Counterculture

02 Mar 2018  |  remezcla.com
Colombian illustrator Rapiña has amassed an extensive collection of over 1,800 Latin American zines, reflecting a range of countercultural movements. La Maleta Fanzinera, her project founded in 2016, aims to preserve and exhibit these zines, which capture the essence of anti-fascist punks, feminist activists, and anarchist creatives. The collection, which has been recognized for its historical value, is unique in its accessibility, as Rapiña travels to various events to display the zines. Ariadna Varse, a Mexican transplant in Ecuador, is among the contributors to this archive, which is seen as a non-official record of history and a testament to the 'B-side' of history.

6 Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA Performance Events You Can Attend in Los Angeles This Weekend

18 Jan 2018  |  Remezcla
The article highlights six cultural performance events happening in Los Angeles, featuring artists and groups from Mexico, Peru, and Guatemala. These events explore themes of identity, resistance, historical memory, and political critique through various forms of performance art, including dance, theater, and multimedia presentations. Key performances include Colectivo AM's dance documentation project, Teatro Linea de Sombra's reflection on Mexican student activism, and Grupo Cultural Yuyachkani's critique of Peruvian national history. The events are hosted at notable LA venues such as LACMA, The Broad, and MOCA.

The Struggles and Resilience of Trans Women Living in Peru

08 Jul 2016  |  remezcla.com
Danielle Villasana, a Texas-born photojournalist, captured the lives of trans women in Lima, Peru, through her photo project 'A Light Inside.' The project challenges stereotypes prevalent in Peruvian media that often depict trans women negatively. Villasana's work reveals the community's resilience and the intimate, supportive relationships formed among trans women, despite facing systemic discrimination, violence, and marginalization. The article discusses the lack of legislative protections for transgender citizens in Peru, the high incidence of sex work among trans women due to employment discrimination, and the significant risk of HIV in the community.
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