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Durrie Bouscaren

Istanbul, Turkey
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About Durrie
Durrie Bouscaren is a freelance radio and digital journalist based in Istanbul, Turkey. 

Previously, she covered breaking news and health care for National Public Radio affiliates in the United States. In 2018, she reported from Papua New Guinea as NPR's John Alexander Fellow. 

She is conversant in French, public records and most editing software.

https://www.durriebouscaren.com/
Languages
English French
Services
Audio package (Radio / Podcast) Interview (Video / Broadcast) News Gathering
+8
Skills
Business Politics Current Affairs
+12
Portfolio

Parents seek justice for children crushed in collapsed hotel during Turkish earthquake

09 Feb 2024  |  theworld.org
Parents of children who died in the Grand Isias Hotel collapse during the February 2023 Turkish earthquake are pursuing a landmark criminal case against the hotel owners and those involved in its construction. The earthquake, which killed over 59,000 people in Turkey and northern Syria, led to the collapse of the hotel, resulting in 72 deaths, including 24 young volleyball players. The parents, represented by a legal team, argue that the hotel was not built safely, especially given the known earthquake risk in the area. Eleven defendants face charges of 'conscious negligence,' with the next hearing scheduled for April 26.

In Gaza, a poet's last words joins messages sent by everyday people

28 Dec 2023  |  theworld.org
Palestinian poet and academic Refaat Alareer was killed in an Israeli airstrike in Gaza, which claimed the lives of his family and raised the death toll to 21,000. Prior to his death, Alareer shared a poem titled 'If I Must Die,' joining many in Gaza who have left final messages for posterity or loved ones.

Earthquake survivors adapt to a life without buildings

14 Aug 2023  |  theworld.org
Six months after devastating earthquakes in southern Turkey and northern Syria, Antakya remains a landscape of cracked high-rises, tent cities, and debris. Despite government promises to rebuild within a year, most residents live in tents and shipping containers, facing harsh conditions like heat and skin infections. With over 50,000 deaths in Turkey, half in Hatay province, residents are slowly adapting to life amid the rubble.

In Papua New Guinea's Sorcery Wars, A Peacemaker Takes On Her Toughest Case

01 Apr 2023  |  NPR
The article discusses the violence in Papua New Guinea (PNG) related to sorcery accusations, focusing on the efforts of Ato Boropi, co-founder of the Kafe Urban Settlers Women's Association, to mediate peace between warring clans. In the Eastern Highlands, accusations of sorcery often lead to vigilante justice and killings. Despite a national law criminalizing sorcery and false accusations, violence persists, with an estimated 30 to 500 deaths annually. Boropi's latest peace attempt in the village of Johogave was challenged when a third clan joined the conflict, and her relatives were involved. The article also explores the historical context of sorcery in PNG, the impact of colonialism and Christianity, and the challenges faced by law enforcement and local peacemakers. It highlights the complexities of addressing sorcery-related violence, including the role of jealousy and power dynamics within communities. The article concludes with Boropi's decision to withdraw from the conflict in Johogave after a failed ceasefire and subsequent retaliatory killings.

‘I feel quite desperate right now’: In leaked databases, Uyghurs search for names of the missing

31 May 2022  |  theworld.org
Uyghur activist Abduweli Ayup and others in the diaspora are searching through leaked Xinjiang Police Files, which reveal the names and photos of approximately 22,000 people arrested during China's 'Strike Hard' campaign. The files, published by the US-based Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation, detail severe human rights abuses, including orders for guards to shoot escaping detainees. The Chinese government dismisses the leaks as 'lies and rumors,' but Uyghurs worldwide recognize their friends and relatives in the documents, confirming their authenticity. The article highlights the emotional toll on Uyghurs who have lost contact with their families and continue to search for missing loved ones.

200 miles from Ukraine, villagers are nervous about a NATO missile-defense system in their backyard

31 Mar 2022  |  www.businessinsider.com
In Deveselu, Romania, locals express unease about the NATO Aegis Ashore missile defense system near their village, especially with the ongoing war in Ukraine. The system, costing $800 million and built during the Obama administration, is intended to intercept missiles from Iran but is seen by Russia as a threat. Russian President Vladimir Putin has suggested it could be modified for offensive use, a claim dismissed by American experts. The presence of the system has changed the dynamics of the village, with NATO personnel spending in nearby cities rather than the local community. Romania, a NATO member since 2004, has accepted over 3.6 million Ukrainian refugees. Locals fear the implications if Ukraine falls to Russia, with some believing NATO membership has so far shielded them from a worse situation.

Navigating war without sound: Ukraine’s deaf refugees

30 Mar 2022  |  theworld.org
Deaf Ukrainians, including Olga Sviridenko and her family, have faced unique challenges fleeing the war, unable to hear air raid sirens or bombings. They, among an estimated 38,000 deaf or hard of hearing Ukrainians, have sought refuge in neighboring countries like Romania, where they were assisted by ANSR, Romania’s National Association of the Deaf. Despite language barriers, they have found ways to communicate and support each other. The World Federation of the Deaf has emphasized the vulnerability of those with limited access to information in war settings. Some deaf refugees have found safety in France and Germany, while others remain displaced within Ukraine or at the borders.

In southern Romania, villagers are uneasy about a NATO missile defense system in its backyard

23 Mar 2022  |  theworld.org
Villagers in Deveselu, Romania, express unease about the nearby NATO missile defense system, fearing it could make them a target amid the ongoing Russia-Ukraine war. The Aegis Ashore system, intended for defensive purposes, has raised concerns among locals and Russian officials alike. While some residents initially welcomed the system for potential economic benefits, the current geopolitical tensions have heightened fears. Experts argue the system poses no real threat to Russia, but distrust remains. The article highlights the mixed sentiments and the broader implications of NATO's presence in Eastern Europe.

The new Russian diaspora finds a home in Istanbul

17 Mar 2022  |  theworld.org
A concert in Istanbul by anti-war rapper Oxxxymiron, attended by many Russians against Putin's war in Ukraine, raised $30,000 for Ukrainian refugees. The event symbolizes the emergence of a new Russian diaspora in cities like Istanbul, where young, educated Russians are relocating following the invasion and sanctions. Russians are assisting each other in leaving the country, with a relocation guide by Irina Lobanovskaya gaining over a million views. Despite the difficulties posed by sanctions affecting services like Visa, Mastercard, and PayPal, many Russians are determined to leave, with Turkish Airlines running full flights from Moscow. Ksenia Demakhina, a Russian psychotherapist in Istanbul, reflects on her painful decision to leave Russia due to the war and political repression.

In Putin’s information war, refugees beg their families to accept reality

15 Mar 2022  |  theworld.org
Maria Moroz, a Ukrainian refugee, is actively trying to counter Russian state media propaganda by sharing the harsh realities of the war in Ukraine with her family in Russia and Crimea. Despite the Russian media's portrayal of the conflict as a 'liberation' mission, Moroz's personal experiences and social media updates aim to reveal the truth to her relatives. Her family, initially influenced by Russian media, is beginning to see through the misinformation. Moroz plans to stay in Europe until it is safe to return to Ukraine, her beloved homeland.

Ukrainians fleeing war are welcomed at Romania’s southern border

08 Mar 2022  |  theworld.org
Anna, a Ukrainian refugee and attorney from Kharkiv, has arrived in Isaccea, Romania, as part of the 2 million people fleeing Ukraine since the Russian invasion began on February 24. With men aged 18 to 60 unable to leave due to draft eligibility, the refugees are predominantly women, children, and the elderly. Romania and Moldova, both among Europe's poorest countries, have each taken in about 82,000 refugees, with many continuing on to Western Europe. Moldova, not a member of the EU or NATO, faces vulnerability with a pro-Russian breakaway region, Transnistria, while Romania is more secure through NATO membership. The countries are also key in supply routes for aid into Ukraine and facilitating refugee safety.

US’ indefinite ban on Iranians drafted into Iran’s Revolutionary Guard continues to separate families

22 Feb 2022  |  theworld.org
The US maintains an indefinite ban on Iranians who have served in Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC), designated as a foreign terrorist organization, preventing them from entering the country. This policy continues to separate families, as exemplified by Mehdi, an Iranian who aspired to study water management in the US but was barred due to his compulsory service in the IRGC. Despite President Biden lifting a Trump-era visa ban on several majority-Muslim nations, those with IRGC service remain ineligible. Affected Iranians are connecting through social media and advocacy groups, like the National Iranian American Council, to challenge the policy. The State Department confirms the ineligibility but does not comment on internal policy discussions. Individuals like Ghazaleh Fotouhi and Moloud are actively campaigning for change, highlighting the personal toll of the ban.

Waste pickers in Istanbul are being targeted for deportation

01 Jan 2022  |  wvtf.org
In Istanbul, undocumented migrant waste pickers, predominantly from Afghanistan, are facing increased risk due to immigration raids. These individuals, who collect recyclable materials from trash for income, are being targeted by Istanbul riot police, resulting in arrests and deportations. The raids are officially justified by unsanitary conditions and illegality, but Ali Mendillioglu, head of an association for waste pickers, suggests they aim to reduce competition for private recycling companies. Sonia Dias from WIEGO notes a global trend towards privatized, mechanized recycling that marginalizes labor-intensive waste picking. Some countries, like Colombia, have successfully integrated waste pickers into formal systems, improving working conditions.

Waste pickers in Istanbul are being targeted for deportation

01 Jan 2022  |  Aspen Public Radio
In Istanbul, undocumented migrant waste pickers, predominantly from Afghanistan, are facing increased risk due to immigration raids. These individuals, who collect recyclable materials from trash for income, are being targeted by Istanbul riot police, resulting in arrests and deportations. The regional governor's office claims the warehouses where waste pickers work are unsanitary and illegal. However, Ali Mendillioglu, head of an association for waste pickers, suggests the raids aim to reduce competition for private companies in the recycling market. Sonia Dias from WIEGO notes that while some countries have successfully integrated waste pickers into formal systems, others are moving towards privatized, mechanized recycling, often at the expense of labor-intensive waste picker networks.

Waste pickers in Istanbul are being targeted for deportation

01 Jan 2022  |  WVXU
In Istanbul, undocumented migrant waste pickers, predominantly from Afghanistan, are facing increased risk due to immigration raids. These individuals, who collect recyclable materials for a living, are being targeted by Istanbul riot police, with many arrested and sent to deportation centers. The raids are officially justified by sanitary concerns, but some, including Ali Mendillioglu, head of an association for waste pickers, suggest they aim to reduce competition for private recycling companies. Experts like Sonia Dias from WIEGO note a global trend towards privatized, mechanized recycling that marginalizes labor-intensive waste picking, despite some countries like Colombia integrating waste pickers into formal systems and improving working conditions.

'Waste pickers' in Istanbul are being targeted for deportation

01 Jan 2022  |  WUNC
In Istanbul, undocumented Afghan waste pickers face increased risks due to recent immigration raids. These raids, justified by the Turkish government as addressing unsanitary conditions, are seen by some as efforts to reduce competition for private recycling companies. The industry, rife with child labor and low pay, is a last resort for many migrants. Experts suggest that instead of criminalizing waste pickers, governments should integrate them into formal systems, as seen in Colombia.

'Waste pickers' in Istanbul are being targeted for deportation

01 Jan 2022  |  www.kvnf.org
In Istanbul, undocumented Afghan waste pickers face increased risks due to recent immigration raids. These raids, conducted by riot police, have led to arrests and deportations, with officials citing unsanitary conditions. However, some believe the true motive is to reduce competition for private recycling companies. The industry, rife with child labor and abuse, sees many Afghans working under harsh conditions. Experts argue that instead of criminalizing waste pickers, governments should integrate them into formal systems, as seen in countries like Colombia.

'Waste pickers' in Istanbul are being targeted for deportation

01 Jan 2022  |  news.prairiepublic.org
In Istanbul, undocumented Afghan waste pickers face increased risks due to recent immigration raids. These raids, conducted by riot police, have led to arrests and deportations, with officials citing unsanitary conditions and legal violations. Critics argue that the raids aim to reduce competition for private recycling companies. The article highlights the harsh working conditions and child labor prevalent in the waste-picking industry, contrasting Turkey's approach with countries like Colombia, which have integrated waste pickers into formal systems to improve their conditions.

Waste pickers in Istanbul are being targeted for deportation

01 Jan 2022  |  krcu.org
In Istanbul, undocumented migrants, often from Afghanistan, work as waste pickers due to limited employment options. These individuals, who collect recyclable materials from trash, face hard labor and low pay, with children as young as 13 involved in the industry. Recently, Istanbul riot police have raided waste picker warehouses, leading to arrests and deportations, under the pretext of unsanitary conditions and illegality. However, some, like Ali Mendillioglu, suggest the raids aim to reduce competition for private recycling companies. Sonia Dias from WIEGO notes that while some countries have successfully integrated waste pickers into formal systems, others are moving towards privatized, mechanized recycling, often at the expense of laborers.

'Waste pickers' in Istanbul are being targeted for deportation

01 Jan 2022  |  www.kclu.org
In Istanbul, undocumented Afghan waste pickers face increased risks due to recent immigration raids by Turkish authorities. These raids, described by officials as targeting unsanitary and illegal warehouses, have led to arrests and deportations. Critics argue the raids aim to reduce competition for private recycling companies. The article highlights the harsh working conditions and exploitation within the waste picking industry, including child labor. Experts suggest that instead of criminalizing waste pickers, governments should integrate them into formal systems to improve their working conditions.

'Waste pickers' in Istanbul are being targeted for deportation

01 Jan 2022  |  www.wrkf.org
In Istanbul, undocumented Afghan waste pickers face increased risks due to recent immigration raids by Turkish authorities, who claim the operations are unsanitary and illegal. Critics argue the raids aim to reduce competition for private recycling companies. The industry, rife with child labor and abuse, sees many Afghans working under harsh conditions. Experts suggest that instead of criminalizing waste pickers, governments should integrate them into formal systems, as seen in Colombia. The situation reflects broader trends in waste management privatization and labor rights in the global south.

Waste pickers in Istanbul are being targeted for deportation

01 Jan 2022  |  kgou.org
In Istanbul, undocumented migrants, often from Afghanistan, work as waste pickers due to inadequate municipal waste management. These workers, including children, face hard labor with low pay and are subject to abuse. Recent raids by Istanbul riot police have led to arrests and deportations, with claims that the actions are aimed at reducing competition for private recycling companies. Some countries, like Colombia, have successfully integrated waste pickers into formal systems, improving working conditions.

'Waste pickers' in Istanbul are being targeted for deportation

01 Jan 2022  |  NPR Illinois
In Istanbul, undocumented waste pickers, primarily Afghan migrants, face increased risks due to recent immigration raids. These raids, conducted by riot police, have led to arrests and deportations, with officials citing unsanitary conditions. Critics argue the raids aim to reduce competition for private recycling companies. The article highlights the harsh working conditions and exploitation within the waste picking industry, including child labor. It also discusses global trends in waste management, noting that some countries, like Colombia, have successfully integrated waste pickers into formal systems.

'Waste pickers' in Istanbul are being targeted for deportation

01 Jan 2022  |  KTEP
In Istanbul, waste pickers, primarily undocumented Afghan migrants, face increased risks due to recent immigration raids. These raids, justified by officials as addressing unsanitary conditions, are seen by some as efforts to reduce competition for private recycling companies. The waste picking industry, rife with child labor and low pay, is a last resort for many migrants. Experts suggest that governments often use poor conditions to outlaw waste pickers, while some countries like Colombia have successfully integrated them into formal systems.

10 embassies call for Turkey to release imprisoned civil society leader Osman Kavala

28 Oct 2021  |  ktep.org
Osman Kavala, a Turkish civil society leader imprisoned for four years, has become the focal point of a diplomatic crisis between Turkey and NATO allies. Ten embassies, including the U.S., have demanded his release, leading to Turkish President Erdogan threatening to expel the ambassadors, although he later retracted the threat. Kavala's work with the Open Society Foundation and his advocacy for dialogue and diversity have been cited as reasons for his imprisonment on charges of espionage and organizing protests, which he denies. Despite an acquittal and the European Court of Human Rights ordering his release, Turkish authorities have not complied. Kavala's next hearing is on November 26, which he plans to boycott, doubting the possibility of a fair trial.

10 embassies call for Turkey to release imprisoned civil society leader Osman Kavala

28 Oct 2021  |  KUNR Public Radio
Osman Kavala, a Turkish civil society leader imprisoned for four years, has become the focal point of a diplomatic crisis between Turkey and NATO allies. Ten embassies, including that of the U.S., have called for his release, leading to Turkish President Erdogan threatening to expel the ambassadors, although he later retracted the threat. Kavala, who has been involved in pro-democracy work, faces charges of espionage and involvement in protests and a coup attempt, which he denies. Despite an acquittal and the European Court of Human Rights ordering his release, Turkish authorities have not complied. Kavala's next hearing is on November 26, which he plans to boycott, citing the impossibility of a fair trial.

10 embassies call for Turkey to release imprisoned civil society leader Osman Kavala

28 Oct 2021  |  www.kawc.org
Osman Kavala, a Turkish civil society leader imprisoned for four years, has become the focal point of a diplomatic crisis between Turkey and ten embassies, including the U.S., which have called for his release. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan initially threatened to expel the ambassadors but later retracted his statement. Kavala, accused of espionage and involvement in protests and a coup attempt, denies the charges, and his lawyer criticizes the lack of evidence. The European Court of Human Rights has ordered his release, but Turkey has not complied, risking suspension from the Council of Europe. Kavala's next hearing is set for November 26, which he plans to boycott, citing the impossibility of a fair trial.

10 embassies call for Turkey to release imprisoned civil society leader Osman Kavala

28 Oct 2021  |  wxxinews.org
Osman Kavala, a Turkish civil society leader imprisoned for four years, has become the focal point of a diplomatic crisis between Turkey and NATO allies. Ten embassies, including the U.S., have called for his release, leading to Turkish President Erdogan threatening to expel the ambassadors, although he later retracted the threat. Kavala's work with the Open Society Foundation and his advocacy for dialogue and diversity have been highlighted, but he remains accused by the Turkish government of espionage and involvement in protests and a coup attempt. Despite an order from the European Court of Human Rights for his release, Turkish authorities have not complied. Kavala's next hearing is set for November 26, which he plans to boycott, citing the impossibility of a fair trial.

Syrian refugees and migrants in Turkey face a difficult decision to return home

23 Sep 2021  |  theworld.org
Syrian refugees and migrants in Turkey are facing the difficult decision of whether to return to their homeland amid the ongoing civil war and economic hardships. Despite the risks of detention, interrogation, and abuse upon returning to Syria, as reported by Amnesty International, some refugees feel compelled to leave due to the lack of support and job opportunities in Turkey. The Turkish government, along with other countries, has been encouraging or forcing refugees to return, with claims of 450,000 having already done so. However, the reality of returning includes potential conscription, detention, and an inability to rebuild homes without risking arrest. Meanwhile, many Syrians continue to seek a stable life abroad, with some, like a Syrian grocery shop employee in Istanbul, vowing never to return.

His Family Fled Afghanistan. In Turkey, Other Afghans Help Them Build A New Life

20 Sep 2021  |  KPBS Public Media
Sayyid Ali Hussaini and his family fled Afghanistan due to Taliban persecution, enduring a grueling journey through Iran to reach Turkey. In Trabzon, they received help from fellow Afghans to start anew. Turkey, already hosting millions of refugees, has tightened its borders amid rising anti-immigration sentiment. Despite the challenges, Hussaini remains determined to provide a safe and hopeful future for his daughter, Elisa.

His Family Fled Afghanistan. In Turkey, Other Afghans Help Them Build A New Life

20 Sep 2021  |  www.wprl.org
Sayyid Ali Hussaini and his family fled Afghanistan to escape the Taliban's violence and persecution, enduring a grueling journey through Iran to reach Turkey. In Trabzon, they found support from fellow Afghans who helped them navigate their new life. Despite Turkey's increasing anti-immigration sentiment and stringent border controls, the Afghan community in Trabzon remains supportive. Hussaini's story highlights the ongoing struggles of Afghan refugees and the humanitarian efforts to assist them, while also reflecting on the broader geopolitical implications of the refugee crisis.

Drought in Iraq and Syria could totally collapse food system for millions, aid groups warn

09 Sep 2021  |  theworld.org
Unprecedented drought in Iraq and Syria, exacerbated by climate change and upstream irrigation, is threatening the collapse of the food system for 12 million people. The drought has led to record low water levels in the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, disrupting power and increasing water pollution. Aid groups warn of the severe impact on agriculture and livelihoods, with families spending significant amounts on potable water and farmers facing crop failures. Turkey is criticized for not releasing enough water from its dams, while Turkish officials claim compliance with water-sharing agreements. Efforts to negotiate better water management and infrastructure improvements are ongoing, but the situation remains dire for many farmers.

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