Elizabeth Dickinson

Elizabeth Dickinson

Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates


Available: Yes


Elizabeth Dickinson

Elizabeth Dickinson is a Deca journalist based in the Arabian Peninsula. Her writing has appeared in The New Yorker, Foreign Policy, The Economist, Politico Magazine, the Christian Science Monitor, the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, and The Financial Times, among others. 
Elizabeth was the first Western journalist to chronicle the private Kuwaiti donor network funding Syria's opposition and has written extensively about Gulf financing to conflict.  She is the author of the forthcoming Kindle Single ‘Godfathers and Thieves,’ the untold story of how a hidden army of Syrian exiles poured their life savings into defeating the regime. Her previous Kindle Single is ‘Who Shot Ahmed,’ a true life murder mystery of a 22-year-old videographer, shot in cold blood at the height of Bahrain’s Arab Spring. She is co-editor of the recent book The Southern Tiger, a narrative memoir by Chilean President Ricardo Lagos. 
Elizabeth is a former Gulf Correspondent for The National newspaper, assistant managing editor at Foreign Policy magazine, and Nigeria correspondent for The Economist.  She graduated Cum Laude from Yale University, with a degree in African and International Studies. A Overseas Press Club scholarship recipient, she has reported from five continents and speaks French, Spanish, and Krio (Sierra Leone), as well as basic Yoruba and Arabic. She’s addicted to distance running -- and Twitter: @DickinsonBeth

SKILLS

 
English Spanish French

"...As the war took a more sectarian and extremist turn, so, too, did its private funders. As the grandmothers, wives, brothers, and even children in Kuwait who had donated to the rebels watched as the conflict turned fratricidal, they wondered what they had given their money to. But the funding didn’t stop—instead, it simply flowed in more extreme directions. Moderates like Herbash have essentially been eclipsed by donors who have fewer qualms about the tactics of the most violent jihadist groups."


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"...As the war took a more sectarian and extremist turn, so, too, did its private funders. As the grandmothers, wives, brothers, and even children in Kuwait who had donated to the rebels watched as the conflict turned fratricidal, they wondered what they had given their money to. But the funding didn’t stop—instead, it simply flowed in more extreme directions. Moderates like Herbash have essentially been eclipsed by donors who have fewer qualms about the tactics of the most violent jihadist groups."


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"Among the leaders of the Middle East today, there is perhaps no one more enigmatic or more adored than Sultan Qaboos. During his forty-four years of rule, he has used his absolute authority and the wealth from 5.5 billion barrels of oil reserves to transform Oman from a territory with just ten kilometres of roads and a roaring civil war into a middle-income country whose people have never lived so long in peace."


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