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Elizabeth Macbride

Jerusalem, Israel
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About Elizabeth
Elizabeth MacBride is a Washington, D.C.-based journalist traveling in the Middle East, reporting on business and the economy, including new energy realities.
Languages
English
Services
Interview (Video / Broadcast) Live Reporting Fact Checking
Skills
Business Current Affairs Fact Checking
Portfolio

The Future Of Entrepreneurship In India

06 May 2024  |  Forbes
Yashish Dahiya, co-founder of Policybazaar, discusses the rapid expansion of financial services and the middle class in India, driven by digital identity and payment systems. Policybazaar, a major player in the insurance market, has grown significantly, reflecting broader economic trends. Despite India's advancements, Dahiya expresses concerns about the diminishing opportunities for innovation due to the rapid replication of business ideas. The article highlights India's role in the evolving global economy and the importance of trust in financial services.

Doha Dispatches: Katherine Maher, Loren Gray, AI Apps And Mansplaining

06 May 2024  |  Forbes
Doha serves as a global crossroads, highlighted by the Web Summit tech conference where diverse entrepreneurs from Africa and the MENA region gathered. Katherine Maher, then-CEO of Web Summit, emphasized the untapped potential of emerging markets. The article discusses the rise of AI technologies, the influence of Middle Eastern investments, and the challenges posed by generative AI. Loren Gray's advocacy on mental health and sexual assault, and the business strategies of companies like Udacity and OTB Ventures, are also featured. The piece touches on geopolitical trends, the decline of accurate information, and the evolving landscape of global entrepreneurship.

When Does Pumped Breast Milk Go Bad? An Innovation From Real Life

31 Jan 2024  |  forbes.com
Veon Brewster, working at a large tech company, developed Veba Baby, a device that tracks the time, temperature, and amount of baby's feeding for pumped breast milk, connected to an app that sends alerts when milk quality is compromised. The product, priced at $130, was launched after two years of R&D and personal investment, including a HELOC against the Brewsters' house. Brewster, originally from Jamaica, faced challenges in fundraising despite having a working prototype and aims to raise a $1 million seed round, bolstered by a strong showing at the Consumer Electronics Show. Veba Baby employs a full-time developer and 22 contractors, with plans to expand the team with seed funding.

Interview with Jack Bogle, founder of Vanguard

29 Dec 2023  |  www.linkedin.com
In a 2015 interview, Jack Bogle, founder of Vanguard, shared his leadership lessons, emphasizing the importance of not needing to declare oneself a leader. Bogle, known for his contrarian ideas, founded Vanguard as a shareholder-owned, low-cost asset manager, which grew organically to become the world's largest asset manager at one point. He reflected on his career, including a major mistake at Wellington Management, and admitted he is not a team player. The interview also touched on his book, 'Common Sense on Mutual Funds.'

The Trillion-Dollar Pursuit Of Green Energy May Benefit Tribal Nations

30 Nov 2023  |  Forbes
The article discusses the increasing economic potential for Native American tribes due to the growing demand for green energy, climate change initiatives, and microchip manufacturing, which require minerals, land, and water. Known, a financial services company, aims to channel wealth into communities of color, including Native American communities, by managing assets and developing business ideas. The article highlights the significant mineral resources on Native American lands and the geopolitical dynamics that could benefit tribes economically while posing risks of exploitation and environmental damage. Known's strategy involves leveraging the expertise of fund managers of color to tap into untapped markets, with a focus on high financial returns and social impact.

What Would An AI Three Mile Island Look Like?

30 Nov 2023  |  www.forbes.com
On the one-year anniversary of ChatGPT's launch, experts at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies discussed the realistic concerns surrounding AI, contrasting the hype with the actual state of technology. They highlighted issues such as overconfidence in AI accuracy, vulnerability to AI-generated media, exacerbation of power dynamics, and the risk of rapid, unsupervised AI implementation in critical systems. The conversation also touched on the potential for an AI-related disaster akin to Three Mile Island and the distractions from other emerging threats like semi-autonomous nuclear weapons and synthetic biology. The National Institute of Standards & Technology's director discussed the ethical considerations in synthetic biology, while Rand Corp.'s CEO called for regulatory attention beyond AI to unregulated supply chains for synthesizers capable of creating synthetic viruses.

Small Towns’ Creator Economies Are Antidote For AI Labor Market Fears

30 Nov 2023  |  forbes.com
The rise of the creative economy in small towns, such as Catskill, NY, is seen as a potential counterbalance to the labor market disruption expected from artificial intelligence. With a high rate of entrepreneurship and a focus on hands-on creative occupations, these communities are fostering environments where locally owned businesses thrive. Initiatives like Upstart Co-Lab, founded by Laura Callanan, aim to support these small-scale creators through impact investing. The creative economy includes diverse industries such as fashion, food, and film, and is gaining recognition as a means to create middle-class jobs and support those who struggle with corporate hierarchies.

Wind-Powered Minigrids Could Electrify Malawi, UN-Awarded Founder Says

25 Oct 2023  |  Forbes
Precious Mafunga, a 31-year-old entrepreneur from Malawi, has been recognized by the United Nations for his innovative plan to create wind-powered mini-grids to address the country's severe electricity shortage. With fewer than 12.4% of Malawi's population having access to electricity, Mafunga's solution aims to provide power to rural areas, improving educational attainment and economic development. His company, SolisBioEnergy, has developed a business model ready for testing, with support from organizations like the Canadian Student Energy Fellowship and CrowdSolve. Mafunga's personal experiences and dedication to solving energy poverty are highlighted as key factors in his entrepreneurial journey.

The Dark Web's Criminal Minds See Internet of Things as Next Big Hacking Prize

01 Oct 2023  |  NBC 6 South Florida
Cybersecurity experts highlight the growing threat posed by the rapid proliferation of Internet of Things (IoT) devices, with an estimated 17 billion devices worldwide. These devices, ranging from printers to medical equipment, are vulnerable to hacking, posing risks to critical infrastructure and everyday life. Experts like John Hultquist from Mandiant and Meredith Schnur from Marsh & McLennan emphasize the need for constant innovation and better regulatory standards to mitigate these risks. Recent cyberattacks on entities like Toyota and the Colonial Pipeline underscore the urgency. Companies like ForeScout and Phosphorus are focusing on IoT security, while regulatory bodies like CISA and the European Union are working on guidelines to enhance device security.

The most-popular big tech default email programs are old and vulnerable

01 Oct 2023  |  Augusta-Margaret River Times
The article discusses the vulnerabilities in default email programs from major tech companies like Microsoft and Google, highlighting the challenges faced by small businesses in cybersecurity. It emphasizes the need for better out-of-the-box security features and criticizes the slow response of companies like Microsoft in updating default settings. Experts suggest that government regulation may be necessary to improve cybersecurity standards. The article also touches on the growing cyber insurance market and the increasing number of cyberattacks targeting small businesses.

The most-popular big tech default email programs are old and vulnerable

01 Oct 2023  |  www.broomead.com.au
The article discusses the vulnerabilities in default email programs from major tech companies like Microsoft, Google, and Apple, highlighting the challenges faced by small businesses in cybersecurity. It emphasizes the need for better out-of-the-box security features and criticizes the slow response of companies like Microsoft in updating default settings. The piece also touches on the growing cyber insurance market and the increasing number of cyberattacks, suggesting that government regulation may be necessary to improve cybersecurity standards.

The most-popular big tech default email programs are old and vulnerable

01 Oct 2023  |  Busselton-Dunsborough Times
The article discusses the vulnerabilities of default email programs from major tech companies like Microsoft and Google, highlighting the challenges faced by small businesses in cybersecurity. It emphasizes the need for better out-of-the-box security features and criticizes the slow response of companies like Microsoft in addressing security issues. The article also explores the role of cybersecurity insurance companies like At-Bay and the increasing premiums due to rising cyberattacks. It calls for regulatory intervention to ensure technology products are secure by design, drawing parallels with the evolution of car safety standards.

The Big Risk in the Most-Popular, and Aging, Big Tech Default Email Programs

01 Oct 2023  |  www.nbcnewyork.com
Cybersecurity experts highlight the vulnerabilities in email programs from Microsoft, Google, and Apple, emphasizing the need for frequent updates to default settings. Microsoft Defender for Office 365 blocks millions of malicious emails monthly, but privacy concerns arise with increased monitoring. The 2021 Microsoft Exchange hack exposed the risks to small businesses, which often rely on built-in security features. Experts argue for better out-of-the-box security from big tech companies. Cyber insurance premiums are rising as attacks increase, with companies like At-Bay advocating for regulatory intervention to enhance cybersecurity standards.

Too Good To Go Expands In The United States, Another Example Of A Fast-Growing Company That Helps Consumers And The Planet

28 Jun 2023  |  Forbes
Too Good To Go, a Copenhagen-based company focused on reducing food waste, is expanding in the United States. CEO Mette Lykke emphasizes the importance of investor alignment with the company's mission. The company, which connects consumers with surplus food from grocery stores and restaurants, has raised significant investment and is profitable. Alexandre Mars' venture fund, blisce/, is one of its key investors. The article highlights the challenges and successes of maintaining a socially responsible business model while achieving profitability. Too Good To Go has saved 220 million meals to date and continues to grow, aiming to hire more employees in the U.S. to support its expansion.

Two MIT Profs ID’d An Aging NY City As The Next Innovation Hub. Their Data Is Proving Right

16 Jun 2023  |  nbdispatch.com
Rochester, NY, once dominated by companies like Kodak, is emerging as a promising innovation hub, as predicted by MIT economists Jonathan Gruber and Simon Johnson in 2019. The city is experiencing a resurgence in industries such as semiconductor, advanced optics, and medical technology, partly due to federal funding like the CHIPS Act. Startups like Mosaic Micro and established companies like Optimax are poised for growth. The University of Rochester and Rochester Institute of Technology contribute to a skilled workforce. Despite challenges in revitalizing the downtown area and attracting startup talent, Rochester's innovation ecosystem is supported by organizations like Greater Rochester Enterprise and the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation.

A Bakery Burns, And An Entrepreneur Pulls Herself Together

29 May 2023  |  forbes.com
Danaris Mazara, founder of Sweet Grace Heavenly Cakes, faced the devastation of her bakery burning down due to a fire originating in a neighboring liquor store. Despite the total loss and the challenges of bureaucracy and insufficient support from some organizations, Mazara plans to rebuild with the help of her community in Lawrence, Massachusetts. Her story highlights the resilience of an immigrant entrepreneur and the importance of business interruption insurance. The bakery's destruction is a significant setback, but Mazara's determination and community support suggest a hopeful future.

Don’t Go Into Personal Debt, And Other Tips For Small Business Owners Just Starting Out

30 Apr 2023  |  Forbes
The United States is experiencing a surge in small business formation, with 1.7 million new businesses filed in 2022. The article provides practical advice for new small business owners, emphasizing the importance of starting small, avoiding personal debt, seeking free information, and focusing on customer needs. It highlights the challenges of accessing capital and competing with large businesses but notes that it is cheaper to start a business today due to online platforms. The article also recommends various resources and organizations that can assist small business owners, including SCORE, the Association of Women’s Business Centers, and local Small Business Development Centers.

The most-popular big tech default email programs are old and vulnerable

16 Jan 2023  |  northwesttelegraph.com.au
Microsoft's software, particularly Microsoft Exchange servers, was hacked in 2021, exposing vulnerabilities in widely-used email programs. Small businesses, which often rely on built-in security features from companies like Google, Microsoft, and Apple, are particularly at risk. Cybersecurity experts argue for better default security in software to protect against attacks. Microsoft has a significant market share in enterprise email and has taken steps to improve security, but challenges remain. Cyber insurance companies like At-Bay are seeing increased pressure due to the rise in cyberattacks. Government regulators may need to intervene to ensure cyber safety, as the burden of security often falls on consumers and small businesses. The article discusses the broader implications of cybersecurity in a highly networked society and the role of technology companies in creating secure products.

The most-popular big tech default email programs are old and vulnerable

16 Jan 2023  |  Midwest Times
Microsoft's software, particularly Microsoft Exchange servers, was hacked by a group sponsored by the Chinese government, exposing vulnerabilities in widely-used email programs. Small businesses, which often rely on built-in security features from companies like Google, Microsoft, and Apple, are particularly at risk. Cybersecurity experts and industry professionals argue for better default security in software to protect against cybercrime. Microsoft has made some progress, such as enabling automatic updates and built-in antivirus, but challenges remain. Cybersecurity companies like CrowdStrike and Mandiant are growing, but additional security layers can raise privacy concerns and be counterproductive. Microsoft Defender for Office 365 blocks millions of malicious emails monthly, highlighting the scale of cyberattacks. Cyber insurance companies like At-Bay are seeing increased pressure due to the rise in attacks, with some warning that cybersecurity may become uninsurable. Government regulators may need to intervene to improve cyber safety, similar to the evolution of car safety regulations.

The Big Risk in the Most-Popular, and Aging, Big Tech Default Email Programs

15 Jan 2023  |  nbcchicago.com
Cybersecurity experts warn that email programs from major tech companies like Microsoft, Google, and Apple are based on old technology that is vulnerable to cyber attacks. Microsoft's software, including Microsoft Exchange servers, has been compromised in the past, highlighting the risks to small businesses that rely on built-in security features. Cybersecurity website KrebsOnSecurity emphasizes the importance of default settings, which users rarely change. The article discusses the role of big tech companies in cybersecurity, the rise of cyber insurance, and the need for more secure default settings and quicker vendor responses to vulnerabilities. It also touches on the potential need for government regulation to ensure cyber safety, drawing parallels to the evolution of car safety standards.

The Big Risk in the Most-Popular, and Aging, Big Tech Default Email Programs

15 Jan 2023  |  www.nbcconnecticut.com
Cybersecurity experts warn that default email programs from big tech companies like Microsoft, Google, and Apple are old and vulnerable to cyberattacks. Microsoft Defender for Office 365 blocks millions of malicious emails monthly, but the reliance on outdated technology and default settings poses risks. The 2021 Microsoft Exchange server hack, attributed to a Chinese government-sponsored group, exposed vulnerabilities affecting millions of small businesses. Cyber insurance companies like At-Bay criticize big tech for not providing better out-of-the-box security. Changes to default settings can improve security but may also lead to user backlash. The article discusses the balance between enhancing security and preserving digital privacy, with government regulators potentially needing to step in to ensure cyber safety.

The Big Risk in the Most-Popular, and Aging, Big Tech Default Email Programs

15 Jan 2023  |  nbcsandiego.com
Cybersecurity experts warn that default email programs from big tech companies like Microsoft, Google, and Apple are old and vulnerable to cyber attacks. Microsoft Defender for Office 365 blocks millions of malicious emails monthly, but the reliance on outdated technology poses risks. The 2021 Microsoft Exchange server hack, attributed to a Chinese government-sponsored group, exposed vulnerabilities affecting millions of small businesses. Cyber insurance companies like At-Bay criticize big tech for inadequate default security measures. Changes to default settings can improve security but may also lead to user backlash. The article discusses the balance between enhancing security and preserving digital privacy, with insights from industry professionals and government agencies.

The Big Risk in the Most-Popular, and Aging, Big Tech Default Email Programs

15 Jan 2023  |  nbcchicago.com
Cybersecurity experts warn that email programs from major tech companies like Microsoft, Google, and Apple are vulnerable to cyber attacks due to their reliance on old technology. Microsoft Defender for Office 365 blocks millions of malicious emails monthly, but the 2021 hack of Microsoft Exchange servers exposed the vulnerability of small businesses that cannot afford cybersecurity services. The article discusses the need for better default security in software, the role of big tech in cybersecurity, and the increasing cyber insurance premiums due to the rise in cyberattacks. It also touches on the potential need for government regulation to ensure cyber safety, similar to the evolution of car safety standards.

The Big Risk in the Most-Popular, and Aging, Big Tech Default Email Programs

15 Jan 2023  |  www.necn.com
Cybersecurity experts warn that default email programs from big tech companies like Microsoft, Google, and Apple are old and vulnerable to cyberattacks. Microsoft's software, particularly Microsoft Exchange servers, was hacked by a group sponsored by the Chinese government, exposing vulnerabilities. Small businesses, which often can't afford cybersecurity services, are at risk and rely on built-in security features. Cybersecurity website KrebsOnSecurity's Brian Krebs emphasizes the importance of default settings, as few users change them. Microsoft has a significant market share in enterprise email and has taken steps to improve security, but challenges remain. The article also discusses the role of cyber insurance companies like At-Bay in addressing these risks and the potential need for government regulation to ensure cyber safety.

The Big Risk in the Most-Popular, and Aging, Big Tech Default Email Programs

15 Jan 2023  |  www.nbclosangeles.com
Cybersecurity experts warn that default email programs from big tech companies like Microsoft, Google, and Apple are vulnerable to cyberattacks due to their reliance on old technology. Microsoft Defender for Office 365 blocks millions of malicious emails monthly, but the 2021 hack of Microsoft Exchange servers exposed the vulnerability of small businesses that cannot afford cybersecurity services. The article discusses the need for better out-of-the-box security, the balance between security and privacy, and the role of big tech companies in cybersecurity. It also highlights the increasing cyber insurance premiums and the potential need for government regulation to ensure cyber safety.

The Dark Web's Criminal Minds See Internet of Things as Next Big Hacking Prize

09 Jan 2023  |  nbclosangeles.com
Cybersecurity experts have identified the rapid proliferation of Internet of Things (IoT) devices as a potential inflection point for increased cyberattacks. With an estimated 17 billion IoT devices worldwide, they present new vulnerabilities that can be exploited, potentially affecting critical infrastructure and human life. Cybersecurity firms like Mandiant and insurers such as Marsh & McLennan and Zurich Insurance Group are concerned about the risks. Attacks have already disrupted operations at Toyota and targeted Ukraine's power grid and the Port of London. The industry is responding with innovation and new products, while regulators are developing guidelines and laws to improve IoT security. However, challenges remain, such as the difficulty in updating IoT devices with security patches. The article also highlights the specific risks to medical devices and cars, with the latter becoming a growing target for cyberattacks.

The dark web's criminal minds see Internet of Things as next big hacking prize

09 Jan 2023  |  www.cnbc.com
Cybersecurity experts are increasingly concerned about the vulnerabilities of Internet of Things (IoT) devices, which are becoming prime targets for cybercriminals. The proliferation of IoT devices, estimated at 17 billion globally, has outpaced the development of security measures, making them susceptible to attacks that could disrupt critical infrastructure and everyday life. High-profile incidents, such as attacks on Toyota, Ukraine's power grid, and the Port of London, highlight the growing threat. Experts emphasize the need for constant innovation and better regulatory standards to secure IoT devices. Companies like ForeScout and Phosphorus are focusing on IoT security, while regulatory bodies like CISA and the National Institutes of Standards and Technology are working on guidelines. The transition to electric vehicles and the increasing involvement of regulators offer opportunities to enhance cybersecurity measures. However, the challenge remains significant, with experts calling for a national discussion on device security and manufacturer responsibility.

The Dark Web's Criminal Minds See Internet of Things as Next Big Hacking Prize

26 Dec 2022  |  www.nbcnewyork.com
Cybersecurity experts highlight the growing threat posed by the rapid proliferation of Internet of Things (IoT) devices, which now number an estimated 17 billion globally. These devices, ranging from printers to medical equipment, are increasingly becoming targets for hackers due to their vulnerabilities. Experts like John Hultquist from Mandiant and Meredith Schnur from Marsh & McLennan emphasize the potential for IoT devices to be used in large-scale attacks on critical infrastructure. The cybersecurity industry is responding with innovations and regulatory efforts, but challenges remain, particularly in updating and securing IoT devices. High-profile incidents, such as attacks on Toyota, Ukraine's power grid, and the Port of London, underscore the urgency of addressing these vulnerabilities. The article also discusses the specific risks to connected cars and the evolving regulatory landscape aimed at mitigating these threats.

The Son Of A Single Mom, He Rose From Poverty To Lead One Of The World’s Largest Foundations

15 Dec 2022  |  Forbes
Sam Reiman, director of the Richard King Mellon Foundation, shares his journey from poverty to leading one of the world's largest foundations. Raised by a single mother in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, Reiman's story underscores the emotional and systemic challenges of poverty in America. His mother, Barbara, took night classes to become a truck driver, a decision that profoundly impacted their lives. Reiman's experiences shape his philanthropic work, emphasizing empathy and the importance of diverse paths to success. Under his leadership, the foundation has increased its investments and initiatives, notably in Pittsburgh's Hazelwood Green research campus. Reiman's narrative highlights the complexities of economic mobility and the need for systemic change.

A New $500K Accelerator For Black Founders Opens In Brooklyn

16 Nov 2022  |  Forbes
Clara Wu Tsai, a Brooklyn philanthropist, is launching BK-XL, a $500,000 accelerator for businesses led by people of color, in response to the economic disparities highlighted by the Black Lives Matter movement. The accelerator will provide significant funding and support to 12 startups founded by BIPOC leaders, aiming to address the collapse of VC funding for Black founders. BK-XL will operate in partnership with Visible Hands and is part of a broader $50 million fund announced by Wu Tsai and her husband, Joseph Tsai, to support Black, Brown, and Indigenous people in Brooklyn. The initiative underscores the importance of economic mobility and business ownership as levers for wealth building in marginalized communities.

Women Inventors: What Are We Missing?

31 Aug 2022  |  forbes.com
The Women Inventors’ Rate in the U.S. is only 13%, but historical evidence suggests a significant undercount of women patent-holders. The article explores the possibility that the concept of invention has shifted from ideas improving lives to those generating high profits, potentially disadvantaging women. It highlights three women inventors: Jasmine Johnson of ParentCo with her 'outlet plug plate', Tracy Luckow and Lori Gitomer of Whipnotic with their flavored whipped cream, and Lisa Lane of Lane Innovations with the 'Rinseroo' shower attachment. These inventors demonstrate that women's contributions to innovation may be undervalued and that a broader definition of invention could lead to more support for everyday inventions.

You Know Chef José Andrés. But Do You Know This Woman?

12 Aug 2022  |  Forbes
The article highlights the efforts of Belinda Oakley, CEO of Chartwells, in innovating school lunch delivery during the pandemic. It contrasts the well-known philanthropic work of Chef José Andrés with the lesser-known but impactful work of Oakley and her mostly female team. The piece underscores the importance of communal action and government support in addressing food insecurity, particularly in rural areas. Despite the success of these initiatives, the article criticizes the lapse of expanded school lunch programs and calls for legislative action to sustain them.

A Surprising New Tech Center Is Emerging In Upstate New York

30 Apr 2022  |  Forbes
Upstate New York is experiencing a tech renaissance, with cities like Syracuse and Buffalo emerging as new tech hubs. The region, historically part of the Rust Belt, is now home to successful tech companies like Density, TCGplayer, and ACV Auctions. Local venture capital firms, such as Armory Square Ventures, and state-funded incubators like 43North, are playing crucial roles in this transformation. The Allyn family, former owners of Welch Allyn, continue to invest in the community, supporting both high-tech and immigrant entrepreneurs. This tech-driven economic revival is bringing new life and opportunities to the area.

When Life Inside A Hedge Fund Left Her Wanting, She Started A $2 Million Company In Rural Kenya

20 Apr 2022  |  Forbes
Rocío Pérez Ochoa, a Ph.D. graduate from CERN, left her job at a hedge fund to start Bidhaa Sasa, a company in rural Kenya and Uganda with $1.7 million in revenue and 140 employees. The company, which Pérez Ochoa funded with $2 million, sells products like cookstoves and solar lamps to rural women, many of whom are small-holder farmers. Bidhaa Sasa operates through a network of group leaders who earn commissions and boasts a 98% loan repayment rate. The company's business model, which combines elements of microfinance and direct sales, aims to build capitalism from the ground up and empower women economically. Despite challenges in last-mile distribution and understanding from tech investors, Bidhaa Sasa has made a significant impact on families' lives in emerging markets.

Square’s Jim McKelvey On The Messy Business Of Becoming A World-Changing Entrepreneur

06 Feb 2022  |  Forbes
Jim McKelvey, co-founder of Square and chairman of the St. Louis Federal Reserve, reflects on his unconventional career path and entrepreneurial identity. His book, 'The Innovation Stack,' explores the process of innovation and the unique individuals who drive it, using examples from companies like Southwest Airlines, Square, IKEA, and the Bank of Italy. McKelvey discusses the challenges and discomforts of entrepreneurship, as well as his new venture, Invisibly, which aims to revolutionize content monetization while giving consumers control over their data.

The Next Generation Of Business Leaders Is Redefining Grit. But They Still Might Not Succeed

22 Jan 2022  |  Forbes
Entrepreneurship in the U.S. surged during the pandemic, with a significant increase in businesses owned by women and people of color. Alitzah Stinson's Ivory Paper Co. faced challenges with overwhelming orders and customer complaints, leading to intervention by the Ohio Attorney General's office. Despite difficulties in raising capital, new business owners are relying on soft skills and collaboration. The article highlights the importance of social capital, community support, and balancing mission with profits. It also discusses the shift from individualist entrepreneurship to a more collaborative and transparent approach. The article was updated post-publication to address customer concerns about Ivory Paper Co.

Americans Want To Open The Door To Afghans, Especially Women

18 Aug 2021  |  Forbes
Private initiatives in the United States are emerging to assist Afghans, particularly women, activists, writers, and LGBTQ individuals, in escaping anticipated Taliban retributions. These efforts are often well-financed, with funding from individual donors, companies, and philanthropists. Whitney Rowe and her fiancé David Heldt are among those involved, with Heldt's company raising almost $5 million for evacuations. The Women’s Regional Network and the Institute for Economic Empowerment of Women are also contributing to the cause. Challenges include the complex vetting processes for refugees in developed countries and finding destinations willing to accept them. The Biden administration has pledged to increase the refugee resettlement ceiling, reflecting a political will among Americans to support Afghans, which has been fostered over 20 years of civil society rebuilding efforts.

Basketball Star Jerome Williams Wants To Turn The Business Of Sports Inside Out

11 Jun 2021  |  Forbes
Jerome Williams, a former NBA player, is leveraging his unique journey and experiences to advocate for fair compensation and opportunities for athletes. He is launching Alumni Pros Global Sports to help athletes control their intellectual property and navigate new NCAA rules allowing endorsements. Williams emphasizes the importance of personal connections to overcome systemic racism and offers advice for Black entrepreneurs. He criticizes the NCAA for financial and racial injustices, advocating for awareness and strategic negotiation to ensure fair treatment and compensation.

Elizabeth MacBride

11 May 2016  |  Forbes
The author of the article is the founder of New Builders Dispatch and the writer of the forthcoming book titled 'Little Book of Robo Investing: How To Make Money While You Sleep'. The focus of the author's work is on pivotal moments for entrepreneurs and their businesses. Additionally, the author is interested in utilizing finance as a tool to foster a more equitable society. The article does not provide specific details on companies or cover specific events, but rather outlines the author's areas of interest and expertise.

Americans feeling cautious towards Syrian refugees

23 Nov 2015  |  america.cgtn.com
Over half of Americans oppose allowing Syrian refugees into the country, perceiving them as a security risk. The U.S. has admitted approximately 2,200 Syrian refugees, and President Barack Obama proposes to accept an additional 10,000, facing strong opposition.
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