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Jeffrey Moyo

Harare, Zimbabwe
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About Jeffrey
Jeffrey Moyo is a Harare-based journalist renowned for his in-depth coverage of socio-economic and political issues in Zimbabwe and across Africa. His work is characterized by a deep commitment to highlighting the struggles and resilience of individuals amid economic hardship, political repression, and social challenges. Moyo's reporting spans a diverse array of topics, including the innovative use of cattle as currency during hyperinflation, the environmental devastation caused by illegal gold mining and deforestation, and the complex realities faced by the Zimbabwean diaspora, such as racial discrimination and the obligation of 'black tax'.

Moyo's articles often feature personal narratives that bring to life the broader social issues, such as the plight of the elderly accused of witchcraft, the challenges of rural transportation, and the political imprisonment of opposition figures. His work has also delved into the experiences of the deaf community in their fight for inclusion, the economic conditions leading to a housing crisis, and the adaptation strategies of farmers to climate change. Through his reporting, Moyo has consistently shed light on the importance of sustainable practices and the critical need for environmental conservation.

With his articles published in various international outlets, Moyo has demonstrated a steadfast dedication to reporting African stories with both nuance and empathy. His focus on the upcoming elections in Zimbabwe, for instance, underscores the pervasive fear of political violence among citizens, while his pieces on healthcare challenges and the struggles of nurses seeking better opportunities abroad reflect the complex interplay of local and global dynamics. Jeffrey Moyo's journalism not only informs but also connects audiences around the world to the lived realities of people in Zimbabwe and beyond.
Languages
English Ndebele Shona
Services
Audio package (Radio / Podcast) Interview (Video / Broadcast) Feature Stories
+7
Skills
Politics Current Affairs Natural Disasters
+6
Portfolio

Zimbabwe's Economy in Coma, but Rural Entrepreneurs Thrive

22 Apr 2024  |  INTER PRESS SERVICE
Zimbabwe's economy is in a dire state, with urban entrepreneurs losing confidence. However, in remote rural areas, micro-entrepreneurs are thriving in their one-room businesses. Over two decades ago, the Zimbabwean government confiscated white farmers' lands and redistributed them, leading to the current economic challenges.

Zimbabwe: Rural Entrepreneurs Thriving Against All Odds in Zimbabwe

16 Apr 2024  |  allAfrica.com
In Zimbabwe's Juru Growth Point, rural entrepreneurs like Proud Ndukulani, Tapera Saizi, and Mashoko Kufazvinei are successfully running businesses despite the country's economic downturn. Ndukulani creates vehicle suspension and engine mountings, Saizi is a carpenter, and Kufazvinei operates a vehicle repair workshop. They have managed to support their families and invest in their futures through their enterprises. However, local authorities criticize the entrepreneurs for causing disorder, while the government claims to be promoting rural industrialization.

BMZ support for seven African countries

04 Apr 2024  |  dandc.eu
The article discusses the challenges of measuring unemployment in African countries, highlighting the limitations of official data which often excludes the underemployed, informally employed, and those working in jobs not suited to their qualifications. It specifically mentions the work of Ghanaian economist William Baah-Boateng and references a World Bank report on youth employment in Ghana. The article also details Germany's Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ)'s efforts to promote employment in seven African countries through the Special Initiative on Training and Job Creation, also known as 'Invest for Jobs'. This initiative, part of the 'Compact with Africa' by the G20 states, is coordinated in Ghana by GIZ and aims to support various economic sectors, improve governance, and reduce migration pressure to Europe.

Affordable internet access for all

04 Apr 2024  |  dandc.eu
The article discusses the challenges of internet connectivity in rural Zambia, highlighting the impact on local businesses and the country's overall digital wellbeing. Service providers like MTN and Airtel face difficulties due to the low user base and high data costs. Businesspeople like Veronica Siame and Albert Chungu share their experiences with poor internet access affecting their operations. The Dutch company Surfshark's Digital Quality of Life index ranks Zambia poorly in terms of internet quality and affordability. SpaceX's Starlink has plans to improve the situation by providing fast and affordable internet, with Zambia's president expressing support for the initiative. The article also notes that only a small percentage of Zambians have internet access, mostly through smartphones, and emphasizes the potential benefits of improved internet services for education, health, productivity, and technology development. Starlink's expansion plans include other African countries, aiming to enhance internet access across the continent.

Sign language is crucial for integration

04 Apr 2024  |  dandc.eu
The article focuses on the challenges faced by deaf and hard of hearing individuals in Zimbabwe, highlighting the story of Lizzy Chinopa, a deaf single mother struggling with communication barriers and basic needs. It emphasizes the lack of sign language knowledge among the populace and the scarcity of sign language experts. Activist Lydia Chikate and Barbra Nyangairi of Deaf Zimbabwe Trust discuss the social exclusion and employment difficulties faced by the deaf community, as well as the government's failure to standardize sign language and accommodate the needs of those with auditory impairments in educational institutions. The article calls for government action to improve the lives of deaf and hard of hearing citizens.

Emotional and economic hardships

04 Apr 2024  |  dandc.eu
The article highlights the plight of children in Zimbabwe born with congenital heart diseases, estimated at 4,550 annually. It focuses on the story of Bernard Mutambu, a nine-year-old boy with a severe heart condition, and his mother Linet, who had to quit her job to care for him. The article discusses the challenges faced by families, including economic hardships and emotional distress, as they cannot afford the expensive private healthcare required for treatment. It also mentions the establishment of a paediatric cardiac centre in Bulawayo by the Zimbabwean government, which remains non-operational due to equipment shortages. The NGO Brave Little Hearts is working to address these challenges by petitioning the parliament.

Linked

04 Apr 2024  |  cityfarmer.info
The article, written by Jeffrey Moyo for IDN, discusses the rise of urban agriculture in Southern Africa as a response to economic hardships and food insecurity. It highlights how residents in various countries, including Zimbabwe, Zambia, Mozambique, and Malawi, have started farming in their backyards to supplement their income and provide food for their families. The trend is a result of industrial shutdowns and inflation, which have impacted the livelihoods of many urban dwellers, particularly those who migrated from rural areas. The article provides an example of a person named Gono from Mberengwa who uses his maize yields to support relatives affected by droughts.

Poverty Pursues Resettled Farmers in Zimbabwe

16 Mar 2024  |  rebelion.org
Resettled farmers in Zimbabwe, such as Murewa from Masvingo and Nyson Dewa from Mashonaland Central, continue to face severe poverty decades after the government's chaotic land confiscations from white commercial farmers. Despite receiving agricultural inputs like fertilizers and maize seeds, they struggle with near-zero yields each harvest season. Murewa, who supports the ruling Zanu-PF party in exchange for food and land, and Dewa, who attributes his agricultural failures to being sidelined for supporting the opposition CCC, exemplify the ongoing hardships. The Fast Track Land Reform Programme, initiated by former President Robert Mugabe, intended to address slow land redistribution but has left many resettled farmers impoverished. Climate change experts and agricultural specialists point to unpredictable weather patterns and a lack of technical knowledge as contributing factors to the resettled farmers' plight.

Zimbabweans Gambling for a Living Amid Escalating Hardships

24 Jan 2024  |  allafrica.com
In Zimbabwe, a high unemployment rate has led individuals like 38-year-old Tinago Mukono to turn to betting as a means of survival. Despite the lack of job opportunities, many Zimbabweans are frequenting betting clubs, which have proliferated in the capital, Harare. Experts like Rashweat Mukundu of International Media Support and Prosper Chitambara of the Labor and Economic Development Research Institute of Zimbabwe attribute this trend to the dire economic situation and lack of economic opportunities. While betting is not officially recognized as an economic activity, for many Zimbabweans, it has become a de facto form of employment.

Homeless families, a growing and unattended problem in Zimbabwe

09 Jan 2024  |  ipsnoticias.net
In Zimbabwe, homelessness is a growing crisis, with families living on the streets in dire conditions. The economic downturn, which began with the departure of white commercial farmers in 2000, has led to periods of hyperinflation and extreme poverty, affecting millions. The housing shortage is estimated at 1.25 million units, impacting five million people. Many, including the elderly and disabled, survive in public spaces, while the government's housing waitlist excludes countless in need. Local authorities acknowledge the issue but lack prepared solutions, and the social welfare ministry has no official statistics on homeless families. Human rights activists point out that the homeless include children and ex-convicts struggling to reintegrate into society.

Zimbabwe: Homeless Families Now a Growing Issue in Zimbabwe

04 Jan 2024  |  allafrica.com
The article discusses the severe homelessness crisis in Zimbabwe, highlighting the struggles of individuals like 69-year-old Gladys Mugabe and her disabled son, who live in Harare Gardens. Zimbabwe's economic downturn, marked by hyperinflation and a decline in commercial farming, has exacerbated poverty and homelessness. The International Monetary Fund noted a hyperinflation rate of 172% in July last year. ISS Africa reports a high poverty rate, with a slow projected decline by 2043. The housing shortage is acute, with over 1.2 million Zimbabweans on a waiting list. The government and local authorities acknowledge the issue but lack solutions. Human rights activists point out that ex-convicts also contribute to the homeless population. The article includes statements from various individuals affected by homelessness and those observing its impact on society.

Zimbabwe's Homeless: Surviving on the Streets

04 Jan 2024  |  primanews.org
The article focuses on the dire situation of homelessness in Zimbabwe, highlighting the struggles of individuals like Gladys Mugabe and her disabled son, who live in Harare Gardens. Zimbabwe's economic decline, marked by hyperinflation and a significant drop in living standards since 2000, has led to a sharp increase in poverty and homelessness. The International Monetary Fund reported a hyperinflation rate of 172% in July last year. ISS Africa's estimates show that nearly 45% of Zimbabweans were living in extreme poverty in 2019, with projections of a decline to 20% by 2043. However, the housing shortage remains acute, with over 1.2 million Zimbabweans on the national housing waiting list. The article includes perspectives from local residents, vendors, and officials, as well as insights from human rights activists. It also touches on the government's lack of effective response to the crisis. The plight of the homeless is exacerbated by societal issues such as ex-convicts struggling to reintegrate and the lack of official statistics on homelessness.

Homeless Families Now a Growing Issue in Zimbabwe

04 Jan 2024  |  ipsnews.net
The article discusses the growing issue of homelessness in Zimbabwe, highlighting the struggles of individuals like 69-year-old Gladys Mugabe and her disabled son, who live in Harare Gardens. Zimbabwe's economic challenges, including hyperinflation and a housing shortage estimated at 1.25 million units, have exacerbated the problem. The International Monetary Fund noted a hyperinflation rate of 172% in July last year. ISS Africa reports a high poverty rate, with projections that millions will remain in extreme poverty. Local residents and vendors express concerns about safety and hygiene due to the homeless population. The government's national housing waiting list is long, and many, like 21-year-old orphan David Paina, are not included. Authorities, including Minister July Moyo, often avoid addressing the issue. Local councilors and human rights activists acknowledge the crisis, with some homeless being ex-convicts unable to reintegrate into society. The article underscores the lack of official statistics and the government's inadequate response to the homelessness crisis in Zimbabwe.

A Thriving Border Town Undercuts South Africa’s Anti-Immigrant Mood

24 Dec 2023  |  www.nytimes.com
Musina, a South African border town, thrives on cross-border trade with Zimbabwe, despite the South African government's stringent anti-immigrant policies ahead of national elections. Local businesses rely heavily on Zimbabwean customers, who cross the border to buy goods unavailable at home. The government's new border patrol and proposed immigration law overhaul aim to curb illegal immigration, but locals and experts argue that immigrants significantly contribute to the economy. The article highlights the tension between political rhetoric and economic reality, with many South Africans supporting immigrants for their positive economic impact.

Zimbabwe: From Dancing 'For a Living' to Dancing for 'Women's Dignity'

13 Dec 2023  |  allafrica.com
Proud Mugunhu, a 29-year-old dancer from Zimbabwe, has shifted his focus from commercial dancing to using his talent to combat period poverty. He conducts dance classes where he is compensated with sanitary pads instead of money, which he then donates to impoverished girls and women. Mugunhu's initiative has helped many switch from using rags to proper sanitary wear, thus restoring their dignity and confidence. Despite the Zimbabwean government's announcement of allocating funds for sanitary pads and future plans to distribute them for free, the reality of their availability remains uncertain. Activists and officials continue to advocate for affordable or free menstrual products to address period poverty, which affects school attendance and the well-being of women and girls in poor communities.

Zimbabwean Dancer Battles Period Poverty with Moves and Menstrual Pads

13 Dec 2023  |  primanews.org
Proud Mugunhu, a 29-year-old Zimbabwean dancer, has shifted his focus from commercial dancing to using his talent to combat period poverty by collecting sanitary pads for poor girls and women. He conducts dance classes where he is compensated with sanitary pads instead of money, which he then donates. Despite the Zimbabwean government's announcement of allocating funds for sanitary pads and plans to provide them for free next year, the issue of period poverty persists. Women's rights activists and organizations like Nhanga Trust are advocating for more accessible menstrual products. Local figures, including Epworth's youngest mayor, Anna Sande, and residents like Sharon Bare, praise Mugunhu's efforts. Peace Hungwe of Peace Hub Zimbabwe also commends Mugunhu for his initiative, which helps prevent poor girls and women from resorting to sex work to afford sanitary products.

From Dancing ‘For a Living’ to Dancing For ‘Women’s Dignity’

13 Dec 2023  |  ipsnews.net
Proud Mugunhu, a 29-year-old dancer from Zimbabwe, has shifted his focus from commercial dancing to using his talent to combat period poverty. He conducts dance tutorials where instead of monetary payment, he receives sanitary pads to donate to impoverished girls and women. Growing up in the Epworth informal settlement, Mugunhu was moved by the struggles of girls during menstruation. His initiative has gained recognition and support from various individuals and organizations. Despite the Zimbabwean government's announcement of funds for sanitary pads and future plans for free distribution, the reality of period poverty persists. Women's rights activists and local leaders continue to advocate for accessible menstrual products, while Mugunhu's efforts provide immediate relief and dignity to those in need.

As Inflation Skyrockets, Zimbabweans Turn to Cattle for Currency

25 Nov 2023  |  globalissues.org
In Zimbabwe, where hyperinflation has rendered the local currency nearly worthless, villagers and urban dwellers alike have turned to cattle as a form of currency. Langton Musaigwa and Neliswa Mupepeti, among others, have used cattle for transactions, such as purchasing goods and paying for services, including medical treatment. The Zimbabwean dollar's instability has led people to prefer cattle, which maintain value as long as they are healthy. Some, like Tinago Muchahwikwa and Admire Gumbo, have invested in cattle to preserve their wealth, with remittances from abroad being used to purchase livestock. The FAO notes that livestock is a significant part of Zimbabwe's GDP. Entrepreneurs have even established 'cattle banks' where people can invest in cattle, with offspring increasing the investor's portfolio value. Zimbabwe's inflation rate stands at 257 percent, according to the Zimbabwe National Statistics Agency.

Zimbabwe's Elderly Turn Plastic Waste Into a Source of Income and Environmental Care

22 Oct 2023  |  allafrica.com
In Zimbabwe, elderly citizens are turning plastic waste into an opportunity for self-sustenance. Senior citizens like 76-year-old Tabeth Gowere and 81-year-old Elizabeth Makufa from Harare's Glenora suburb have become known for collecting plastic waste and transforming it into sellable products. This initiative not only provides them with financial independence but also helps clean the environment. The Zimbabwe Environmental Management Agency (EMA) reports that the country produces about 1.65 million tonnes of waste annually, with plastic comprising 18 percent. Local authorities and organizations like Help Age Zimbabwe commend the elderly for their contribution to fighting plastic pollution. The activity also serves as a therapeutic exercise for the seniors, helping them cope with mental stress.

Elderly thrive on plastic waste in Zimbabwe

20 Oct 2023  |  ipsnoticias.net
Elderly individuals in Zimbabwe, such as 76-year-old Tabeth Gowere and 81-year-old Elizabeth Makufa from the densely populated suburb of Glenora in Harare, have turned to collecting and recycling plastic waste to support themselves financially. They create various products from the waste, earning admiration and generating income. The Environmental Management Agency of Zimbabwe estimates that the country produces 1.65 million tons of waste annually, with plastic accounting for 18%. Local authorities and organizations like Help Age Zimbabwe commend the seniors' contributions to environmental conservation and their role in the fight against plastic waste. The recycling efforts not only provide economic benefits but also serve as a therapeutic activity for the elderly.

Seniors Thriving Through Plastic Waste in Zimbabwe

20 Oct 2023  |  ipsnews.net
In Zimbabwe, elderly citizens without pensions or financial support are turning to plastic waste collection to sustain themselves. Individuals like 76-year-old Tabeth Gowere and 81-year-old Elizabeth Makufa from Harare have become adept at creating products from plastic waste, earning money and gaining local fame. They, along with others, have found a way to clean the environment and support themselves financially. The Zimbabwe Environmental Management Agency (EMA) reports that plastic makes up 18% of the 1.65 million tonnes of waste produced annually in Zimbabwe. Local authorities and organizations like Help Age Zimbabwe recognize the valuable contribution of the elderly in environmental conservation and their role in the fight against plastic waste. The initiative is also seen as therapeutic for the elderly, helping them cope with mental stress.

Zimbabwe’s Senior Citizens Turn Plastic Waste into Cash

20 Oct 2023  |  primanews.org
In Zimbabwe, elderly citizens like 76-year-old Tabeth Gowere and 81-year-old Elizabeth Makufa have turned to collecting and weaving plastic waste to sustain themselves financially. Without pensions or financial support from families, they have found a way to earn money and simultaneously clean the environment. They create products such as mats, which have gained popularity, leading to a source of income. The initiative has also been therapeutic for them, helping to alleviate mental stress. Local authorities and organizations like the Zimbabwe Environmental Management Agency (EMA) and Help Age Zimbabwe commend their efforts. The EMA reports that Zimbabwe produces about 1.65 million tonnes of waste annually, with plastic comprising 18 percent. The elderly group's work contributes to reducing waste in landfills and promoting recycling as a business.

Zimbabwe’s Senior Citizens Turn Plastic Waste into Cash

20 Oct 2023  |  globalissues.org
In Zimbabwe, elderly citizens like Tabeth Gowere and Elizabeth Makufa have turned to collecting and weaving plastic waste as a means of financial support and environmental conservation. Without pensions or family support, they earn money by creating and selling products made from recycled plastics. Their efforts not only provide them with a source of income but also help clean up the environment. The local authorities and organizations like the Zimbabwe Environmental Management Agency (EMA) and Help Age Zimbabwe recognize and admire the initiative of these senior recyclers. The article highlights the positive impact of their work on both the environment and the well-being of the elderly, as well as the broader implications for waste management and recycling in Zimbabwe.

Zimbabweans Gambling for a Living Amid Escalating Hardships

01 Oct 2023  |  www.primanews.org
Zimbabwe's prolonged economic downturn and high unemployment rates have driven many, like Mukono, to turn to betting as a means of survival. With over 90% of the population jobless, betting clubs in Harare have become a common sight. Experts like Rashweat Mukundu and Prosper Chitambara offer differing views on the rise of gambling, attributing it to economic hardship and mental health issues. Despite the lack of stringent regulations, betting has become a de facto profession for many Zimbabweans, though it is not seen as a sustainable substitute for employment.

Thousands Camp All Night to Vote, Leaving a Nation on Edge

24 Aug 2023  |  www.nytimes.com
Zimbabwe's presidential election faced significant disruptions, with many urban polling stations remaining open overnight due to delayed ballot deliveries. The incumbent, Emmerson Mnangagwa, and opposition leader, Nelson Chamisa, both claimed early leads. The opposition accused the national electoral commission of deliberately causing delays to favor Mnangagwa. The election's disorganization has heightened tensions in a country already struggling with economic and political challenges.

Zimbabweans Abroad Face Economic Challenges and Racial Discrimination

23 Aug 2023  |  newzimbabwe.com
The article by Jeffrey Moyo for IPS discusses the plight of Zimbabweans living abroad who, despite facing challenges such as homesickness, high living costs, and racial discrimination, are reluctant to return to Zimbabwe due to the severe economic conditions, including hyperinflation. Gift Gonye in Germany, Ellen Mazorodze in Australia, Privilege Kandira in Norway, and Tariro Muungani in the UK share their experiences of the diaspora life, which includes the pressure to support their families back home, often referred to as 'black tax.' The article also touches on the upcoming elections in Zimbabwe and the desire of the diaspora to participate, although only residents can vote. The Zimbabwe National Statistics Agency reports that over 900,000 Zimbabweans have emigrated in the last decade, with actual figures speculated to be between 4 to 5 million. The article highlights the complex emotions and responsibilities of the Zimbabwean diaspora.

The grass is not so green for Zimbabweans in the diaspora

05 Jul 2023  |  ipsnoticias.net
Zimbabweans in the diaspora, despite having well-paying jobs and a good standard of living, face challenges such as nostalgia, economic pressure to support family back home, and racial discrimination. Gift Gonye in Germany, Ellen Mazorodze in Australia, Privilege Kandira in Norway, Tariro Muungani in the UK, and Sophia Tekwane in Sweden share their experiences of the hardships they endure, including the 'black tax' where they are expected to send remittances home. Zimstats reports that less than a million Zimbabweans have left the country since 2012, with South Africa, Botswana, and the UK being top destinations. The article highlights the contrast between the perceived success of the diaspora and the reality of their struggles.

For Zimbabweans Abroad, All That Glitters Is Not Gold

05 Jul 2023  |  allafrica.com
The article discusses the challenges faced by Zimbabweans living abroad, despite their high-paying jobs and standard of living. Gift Gonye in Germany, Ellen Mazorodze in Australia, Privilege Kandira in Norway, Tariro Muungani in the UK, and Sophia Tekwane in Sweden share their experiences of homesickness, the pressure to support family back home, racial discrimination, and the lack of social unity. They express the difficulty of living abroad, where they have to work hard to meet both their own needs and those of their families in Zimbabwe. The article also mentions the upcoming elections in Zimbabwe and the desire of the diaspora to participate. Official figures from Zimstats show that less than one million Zimbabweans have left the country since 2012, but unofficial estimates suggest the number could be as high as 4 to 5 million, driven by economic hardships since 2000.

Greener Pastures Not So Green for Zimbabweans in the Diaspora

05 Jul 2023  |  ipsnews.net
The article discusses the challenges faced by Zimbabweans living in the diaspora. Despite having high-paying jobs and a high standard of living, many Zimbabweans like Gift Gonye in Germany and Ellen Mazorodze in Australia experience homesickness, pressure to support families back home, and racial discrimination. The phenomenon of 'black tax' is highlighted, where migrants financially support their relatives in Zimbabwe, often at the expense of their own savings and investments. The article also touches on the upcoming elections in Zimbabwe and the desire of the diaspora to participate. Privilege Kandira in Norway and Tariro Muungani in the UK share their experiences of racial discrimination, while Sophia Tekwane in Sweden reflects on the lack of social unity abroad compared to the togetherness back home. Despite these challenges, the economic situation in Zimbabwe compels them to endure life abroad to support their families.

Zim prisoner release triggers trauma from ‘Green Bombers’ years

06 Jun 2023  |  mg.co.za
Zimbabwe recently released over 4,200 prisoners to alleviate overcrowding in prisons, with the beneficiaries including older people, children, women imprisoned for nonviolent offenses, and the terminally ill and disabled. However, concerns have been raised that the ruling party, Zanu-PF, may use some of the released prisoners, particularly those convicted of violent offenses but who have served most of their sentences, to commit election-related violence. Opposition activists and human rights advocates fear a repeat of past violence by groups like the 'Green Bombers', a youth brigade that previously targeted opposition supporters. The article draws parallels with Russia's recruitment of prisoners for the Wagner group and speculates on the potential for similar strategies in Zimbabwe's upcoming elections.

It's no joke being a comedian in Zimbabwe

08 May 2023  |  news.trust.org
In Zimbabwe, comedians are facing risks of arrest for satirizing the government and highlighting the hardships of daily life. Despite the end of Robert Mugabe's rule in 2017, which had initially raised hopes for a more open society, the recent arrest of four comedians has shown that the current government still reacts harshly to criticism. President Emmerson Mnangagwa's administration claims to support freedom of expression, but actions such as internet blackouts and the suppression of protests suggest otherwise. Comedians like Prosper Ngomashi and Samantha Kureya continue to use humor as a form of resistance, despite the dangers, while the government maintains that there is a legal limit to satire. The article highlights the importance of comedy in Zimbabwe as a means for the people to cope with economic and social challenges.

Fear and Violence Loom as Zimbabwe Approaches Elections

05 Apr 2023  |  newzimbabwe.com
The article by Jeffrey Moyo for The Globe & Mail highlights the pervasive fear among Zimbabweans as the country approaches new elections. It recounts the experiences of individuals who have suffered from election-related violence in the past, including Maxwell Tauro, whose son was killed during protests in 2018. The article describes a pattern of impunity for security forces and pro-government militias, with victims from previous elections still awaiting justice. It also notes the threats and violence faced by the opposition, particularly the Citizens Coalition for Change (CCC), which has gained popularity and is seen as a threat to the ruling Zanu PF party's four-decade hold on power. The piece underscores the climate of fear and the potential for increased violence in the upcoming 2023 elections, as indicated by statements from government officials and recent attacks on opposition members.

Fear and violence loom as Zimbabwe approaches election

05 Apr 2023  |  bulawayo24.com
The article by Jeffrey Moyo for The Globe & Mail highlights the pervasive fear among Zimbabweans as the country approaches new elections. It recounts the experiences of individuals who have suffered from election-related violence, including Maxwell Tauro, whose son was killed during protests in 2018. The ruling party, Zanu-PF, has been implicated in rising violence and intimidation against opposition supporters. Despite a commission of inquiry finding the military and police responsible for past violence, no arrests or compensations have been made. The opposition, now the Citizens Coalition for Change (CCC), faces severe repression, with recent incidents of attacks on their members and disruptions of their events by pro-government forces. The article suggests that the upcoming elections could see a repeat of past violence, with many Zimbabweans, including victims of previous attacks, fearing for their safety.

Fear and Violence Loom as Zimbabwe Approaches New Elections

01 Apr 2023  |  theglobeandmail.com
The article discusses the pervasive fear among Zimbabweans as the country approaches a new election, with many recalling the brutal violence of previous elections. Maxwell Tauro, a farm labourer, lost his son Challenge Tauro in the 2018 election violence when soldiers fired at protesters. Despite a commission of inquiry led by former South African president Kgalema Motlanthe, which attributed the deaths to military and police actions, no one was prosecuted or compensated. The ruling party, ZANU-PF, has been implicated in rising violence against opposition members, with recent meetings disrupted by pro-government forces. Victims of past election violence, such as Golden Nyazvigo and Issau Nyikadzino, express their fears and plans to flee the country during elections. Leticia Makuvaza, injured in the 2018 protests, is particularly vulnerable due to her wheelchair-bound condition. The opposition party, now the CCC, has gained popularity, but faces threats from ZANU-PF, with President Emmerson Mnangagwa's regime being more repressive than Robert Mugabe's. Former security minister Owen Ncube has even warned of more severe violence in the upcoming 2023 election.

LGBTQ activists in Uganda and across Africa face increasing hostility and violence

30 Mar 2023  |  theglobeandmail.com
The article discusses the increasing hostility and violence faced by the LGBTQ community in Uganda and other parts of Africa. It details the experiences of individuals who have been tortured and attacked due to their sexual orientation. The Ugandan government is pushing for new laws that would further criminalize homosexuality, including a bill that prohibits the 'promotion of homosexuality' and makes it an offense to touch another person with homosexual intent. Human Rights Watch and other organizations have raised concerns about the worsening situation. The article also touches on the situation in Kenya, where the Supreme Court recently ruled in favor of LGBTQ organization registration, sparking a backlash. The article concludes with insights into the lives of LGBTQ individuals in Zimbabwe, where the situation has somewhat improved, allowing them to live with a degree of freedom, albeit still facing societal challenges.

Climate change sees Zimbabweans shift to hilltop farming

27 Mar 2023  |  mg.co.za
The article discusses the shift of farmers in Zimbabwe to hilltop farming due to the degradation of traditional farmlands. Gibson Mudarikwa and Ashton Mujenya, among others, have moved their farming uphill to escape droughts, floods, and infertile soil, finding fertile land on the mountain tops. However, experts like Kudzai Ndidzano, Johnson Masaka, Jason Murevi, and Railton Masango warn that this practice could lead to environmental issues such as reduced water seepage, increased flooding, and mudslides. The government acknowledges the problem but lacks support for sustainable farming measures due to poor governance and a struggling economy. The article highlights the temporary nature of hilltop farming and the potential long-term consequences of this adaptation to climate change.

Munyaradzi (29) is an IT expert – now he sells cookies at a crossroads

18 Mar 2023  |  abcnyheter.no
Munyaradzi Mavhunga, a 29-year-old IT graduate from Speciss College in Harare, Zimbabwe, has been unable to find relevant work and now sells chocolate cookies to motorists at a crossroads. Despite his education, he has been forced to work in the informal sector due to the severe unemployment situation in Africa, where a third of the population aged 15 to 35 was jobless in 2015, and only one in six was in paid employment. Mavhunga, who is married with two daughters, has built a two-room house in Ruwa from his earnings as a street vendor. He expresses bitterness and frustration with the lack of job opportunities and the government's failure to attract investors that could create jobs.

Zimbabwe: 'Stone-Age' Donkey-Drawn Carts Ply Zimbabwe's Abandoned Remote Routes

15 Mar 2023  |  allafrica.com
In the Mwenezi district of Zimbabwe, villagers are reverting to traditional modes of transport, such as donkey-drawn scotch carts, due to the poor condition of rural roads. The roads have been neglected for over two decades, making them impassable for buses and modern vehicles. This has led to a rise in scotch cart operators like Clive Nhongo, who are profiting from providing alternative transportation. While some villagers are frustrated with the lack of modern transport infrastructure, others are benefiting from the situation. Public transport operators are avoiding the area due to the risk of vehicle damage. Local authorities have not regularized scotch carts for passenger transport, raising concerns about road tax and insurance. Despite these challenges, President Emerson Mnangagwa has declared ambitions for Zimbabwe to become a middle-income state by 2025, a goal that opposition activists and development experts find unrealistic given the current state of the country's infrastructure.

\\'Stone-Age\\' Donkey-Drawn Carts Ply Zimbabwe’s Abandoned Remote Routes

15 Mar 2023  |  ipsnews.net
In the Mwenezi district of Zimbabwe, villagers are resorting to 'Stone-Age' methods of transportation due to the severely damaged and neglected road infrastructure. Donkey-drawn scotch carts have become the primary means of transport for accessing essential services like healthcare, as the unpaved rural roads have become impassable for buses. While this has created an opportunity for some villagers to earn a living by charging for rides, it also highlights the lack of modern transport systems and the failure of local authorities to address the issue. The situation has become so dire that even teachers and patients like 64-year-old Dennis Masukume rely on these carts for travel. The article also touches on the broader context of Zimbabwe's challenges, including President Emerson Mnangagwa's ambitious goal for the country to become a middle-income state by 2030, which is met with skepticism by opposition activists and development experts.

Munyaradzi (29) is an IT expert – now he sells cookies at a crossroads

13 Mar 2023  |  panoramanyheter.no
Munyaradzi Mavhunga, a 29-year-old IT graduate from Speciss College in Harare, Zimbabwe, has been unable to find relevant work in his field. Despite his qualifications, he now sells chocolate cookies to motorists at a crossroads to make a living. The African Development Bank reported that a third of Africa's youth were unemployed in 2015, with only one in six in paid employment. Mavhunga, who is married with two daughters, has built a two-room house from his earnings as a street vendor. He expresses dissatisfaction with his job and is critical of the government's failure to attract investors and create jobs.

Forests Disappear in Zimbabwe's Cities Due to Energy Poverty

01 Mar 2023  |  ipsnoticias.net
In Zimbabwe, urban deforestation is escalating due to energy poverty, with residents relying on firewood for energy as electricity is scarce and expensive. The construction of new housing in areas like New Ashdon Park, Harare, has replaced once-thriving forests, and the informal unemployment rate has hit 90%, driving more people to use firewood as a source of income. Environmentalists like Kudakwashe Makanda and Denis Munangatire blame local authorities for allowing unsustainable urbanization and suggest promoting affordable alternative energy sources to save remaining urban forests.

Zimbabwe: Forests Disappearing in Energy Poor Zimbabwean Cities

28 Feb 2023  |  allafrica.com
The article discusses the issue of deforestation in urban areas of Zimbabwe, particularly in the capital, Harare, and its second-largest city, Bulawayo. Residents, like Neliet Mbariro, rely on firewood for energy due to the lack of electricity, leading to the cutting down of trees. Builders such as Arnold Shumba have also contributed to deforestation during the construction of new homes. Environmental activists like Marylin Mahamba and climate change experts including Kudakwashe Makanda highlight the negative impacts of urban deforestation and attribute it to factors such as electricity deficits, rural-to-urban migration, and local authorities' mismanagement. The article suggests that incentivizing alternative power sources like solar energy could help preserve remaining urban forests. Denis Munangatire, an environmentalist, notes that thousands of trees are destroyed annually in Zimbabwe's towns and cities, with local councils partly to blame.

Forests Disappearing in Energy Poor Zimbabwean Cities

28 Feb 2023  |  ipsnews.net
The article discusses the alarming rate of deforestation in Zimbabwean cities, particularly in Harare and Bulawayo, due to the construction of new homes and the lack of electricity. Residents, like Neliet Mbariro, are forced to rely on firewood for energy, leading to the cutting down of trees. Builders such as Arnold Shumba have also contributed to the deforestation in the process of constructing homes. Environmental activists like Marylin Mahamba and climate change experts like Kudakwashe Makanda highlight the severe environmental impact and point to the electricity deficit, rural-to-urban migration, and local authorities' mismanagement as causes. The article also touches on the economic aspect, with many turning to firewood sales for income due to high unemployment rates. Experts suggest incentivizing alternative power sources, such as solar energy, to combat this issue. Denis Munangatire, an environmentalist, provides statistics on the annual loss of trees in urban areas, further blaming local councils for the problem.

Zimbabwe is losing 262 000 hectares of forests destroyed every year

28 Feb 2023  |  globalissues.org
Zimbabwe is facing significant deforestation, with 262,000 hectares of forests being destroyed annually. In Harare's New Ashdon Park, residents rely on firewood for energy due to a lack of electricity, leading to the cutting down of trees. The construction of homes and industrial facilities is also contributing to the loss of forests. Environmentalists and climate change experts attribute the deforestation to electricity deficits, rural-to-urban migration, and local authorities permitting land development in unsuitable areas. The Zimbabwe Power Company's failure to provide sufficient electricity and the high cost of gas are forcing people to use firewood. With high unemployment rates, selling firewood has become a source of income. Experts suggest incentivizing alternative power sources like solar energy to preserve urban forests. The Forestry Commission reports that urban areas are losing thousands of trees annually due to these factors.

Zimbabwe is losing 262 000 hectares of forests destroyed every year

28 Feb 2023  |  rodinanews.co.uk
Zimbabwe is facing a severe deforestation crisis, with 262,000 hectares of forests being destroyed annually. In Harare's New Ashdon Park, residents rely on firewood for energy due to a lack of electricity, leading to the cutting down of trees. The construction of homes and industrial facilities is also contributing to the loss of forests. Environmentalists and climate change experts attribute the deforestation to electricity deficits, rural-to-urban migration, and local authorities permitting land development in unsuitable areas. The Zimbabwe Power Company's failure to provide sufficient electricity and the high cost of gas force people to use firewood. With high unemployment rates, selling firewood has become a source of income. Experts suggest incentivizing alternative power sources like solar energy to combat urban deforestation. The Forestry Commission reports that urban areas are losing thousands of trees each year, and environmentalists blame urban councils for not protecting urban forests during development projects.

Zimbabwe's Nurses Battle Poverty and Government Restrictions in Quest to Emigrate

02 Feb 2023  |  theglobeandmail.com
The article discusses the plight of Zimbabwean nurses who are struggling to survive on meager salaries amid the country's economic collapse. Nurses like Agnes Masarira are desperate to emigrate to countries like Canada and Britain, which face a shortage of health workers, but are hindered by the Zimbabwean government's refusal to provide necessary documents such as nursing diplomas and verification letters. The government has also introduced repressive measures to prevent health workers from striking for better wages. The situation has led to accusations of human rights abuses, as nurses are forced to live in poverty and are unable to pursue opportunities abroad. The article highlights individual stories of nurses who are unable to afford basic necessities and are seeking a way out of the country.

Zimbabwe's Homeless: Surviving on the Streets

04 Jan 2023  |  globalissues.org
The article focuses on the dire situation of homeless families in Zimbabwe, highlighting the struggle for survival on the streets of Harare. Gladys Mugabe, a 69-year-old woman, and her disabled son are among those living in Harare Gardens, a public park. Zimbabwe's economic challenges, including hyperinflation and a significant housing shortage, have exacerbated the issue. The International Monetary Fund noted a hyperinflation rate of 172% in July of the previous year, and ISS Africa reported a high poverty rate. Local residents and vendors express concerns about safety and sanitation due to the presence of homeless individuals. The government's national housing waiting list is overburdened, and authorities, including the Minister of Local Government, July Moyo, avoid addressing the homelessness crisis. Opposition councilor Denford Ngadziore and Harare City Council spokesperson Stanely Gama acknowledge the problem but lack solutions. Peace Hungwe, a human rights activist, points out that ex-convicts also contribute to the homeless population. The article underscores the lack of official statistics and the government's inadequate response to the crisis.

Zimbabwe's Homeless: Surviving on the Streets

04 Jan 2023  |  rodinanews.co.uk
The article focuses on the dire situation of homelessness in Zimbabwe, highlighting the struggles of individuals like Gladys Mugabe and her disabled son, who live in Harare Gardens. Zimbabwe's economic decline, marked by hyperinflation and a significant drop in living standards since 2000, has led to a sharp increase in poverty and homelessness. The country faces a housing shortage with over 1.2 million people on the national waiting list. Local authorities and government officials, such as July Moyo, Minister of Local Government, have failed to address the crisis effectively. The article also touches on the challenges faced by homeless families, teenage parents, and ex-convicts in reintegrating into society. Human rights activists and organizations like PeaceHub Zimbabwe are mentioned as working on related issues, but the overall picture is one of a systemic problem with no immediate solution in sight.

Zimbabwean Dancer Turns to Sanitary Pad Collection to Help Poor Girls and Women

13 Dec 2022  |  rodinanews.co.uk
Proud Mugunhu, a 29-year-old Zimbabwean dancer, has shifted his focus from commercial dancing to using his talent to combat period poverty by collecting sanitary pads for poor girls and women. Initially dancing for money, Mugunhu now conducts dance tutorials where he is compensated with sanitary pads, which he then donates. He began this initiative after witnessing the struggles of girls and women in his hometown of Epworth. Despite the Zimbabwean government's announcement of allocating funds for sanitary pads and plans to provide them for free next year, the issue of period poverty persists. Women's rights activists and organizations continue to advocate for affordable or free menstrual products. Local figures like Priscilla Misihairambwi-Mushonga, Lilian Matsika, Bridget Mushayahanya, Chipo Chikomo, Anna Sande, Sharon Bare, and Peace Hungwe have expressed their views on the matter, with some praising Mugunhu's efforts.

Zimbabwean Dancer Battles Period Poverty with Moves and Heart

13 Dec 2022  |  globalissues.org
Proud Mugunhu, a 29-year-old Zimbabwean dancer, has shifted his focus from commercial dancing to using his talent to combat period poverty by collecting sanitary pads for impoverished girls and women. He conducts dance classes where he is compensated with sanitary pads instead of money, which he then donates. Despite the Zimbabwean government's announcement of funds to provide free sanitary pads, the distribution remains uncertain. Women's rights activists and organizations like Nhanga Trust advocate for accessible menstrual products. Local figures, including Epworth's youngest mayor, Anna Sande, and residents like Sharon Bare, commend Mugunhu's efforts. Peace Hungwe of Peace Hub Zimbabwe also praises Mugunhu for addressing the challenges faced by poor girls and women during menstruation.

Available in

28 Nov 2022  |  agrifocusafrica.com
The article by Jeffrey Moyo discusses how villagers in Mberengwa, Zimbabwe, have resorted to using cattle as a form of currency due to the severe inflation that has rendered the Zimbabwean dollar nearly worthless. Langton Musaigwa and Neliswa Mupepeti are among those who have adopted livestock as a means of trade for goods and services. The article highlights that during the 2007 inflation crisis, and again in the current situation with inflation at 257 percent, cattle have become a stable currency alternative. Zimbabweans with access to US dollars, like Tinago Muchahwikwa and Admire Gumbo, are investing in cattle to preserve their wealth. The UN's FAO notes that livestock accounts for a significant portion of Zimbabwe's GDP. The article also mentions the emergence of cattle banks, such as Silverback Asset Managers, where Zimbabweans can invest in cattle using the local currency, with the offspring of the cows increasing the investor's portfolio value.

Zimbabweans Turn to Cattle as Inflation Decimates Currency

26 Nov 2022  |  allafrica.com
In Zimbabwe, hyperinflation has led to the local currency becoming nearly worthless, prompting people to use cattle as a form of currency. Langton Musaigwa and others in Mberengwa district have resorted to trading cattle for goods and services as the Zimbabwean dollar plummeted. Neliswa Mupepeti used cattle to pay for transportation to medical treatment, and others like Tinago Muchahwikwa and Admire Gumbo have invested in cattle to preserve their wealth. The use of cattle as currency has become more common as the Zimbabwean dollar continues to lose value against international currencies. The FAO notes that livestock accounts for a significant portion of Zimbabwe's GDP. Silverback Asset Managers has even created a unit trust investment vehicle for cattle, allowing people to invest in livestock using the local currency. The offspring of the cows increase the investor's portfolio value, offering a hedge against inflation.

Cattle Turn Into New Currency Amid Inflation in Zimbabwe

25 Nov 2022  |  ipsnews.net
In Zimbabwe, where hyperinflation has rendered the local currency nearly worthless, villagers in Mberengwa district have resorted to using cattle as a form of currency. Langton Musaigwa and others in his community have been trading cattle for goods and services as the Zimbabwean dollar continues to plummet in value. This practice, which began during the 2007 inflation crisis, has resurfaced due to the current economic instability. The Zimbabwe National Statistics Agency reports inflation at 269 percent, and a single cow is valued at approximately 400 US dollars. Zimbabweans with access to foreign currencies, like Tinago Muchahwikwa and Admire Gumbo, are investing in cattle to preserve their wealth. The FAO notes that livestock contributes significantly to Zimbabwe's GDP. Silverback Asset Managers has even created a unit trust investment vehicle for cattle, allowing investors to add the value of calves to their portfolios. This trend of 'cattle currency' is a response to the ongoing financial challenges faced by the country.

Still defiant: Job Sikhala

05 Nov 2022  |  mg.co.za
Job Sikhala, the deputy chair of Zimbabwe's opposition party, the Citizens Coalition for Change, has been imprisoned for over 100 days, facing charges of inciting violence, which he denies and claims are politically motivated. He is being held in solitary confinement at Chikurubi Maximum Security Prison. Despite the harsh conditions, Sikhala remains defiant and committed to his cause. His case has sparked controversy, with his advocate alleging political interference in the judiciary, while the Justice Minister denies any discrimination or selective law application. Sikhala's personal struggles include concern for his family, especially his youngest son. The article highlights the broader issues of political oppression and the state of the judicial system in Zimbabwe.

Informal miners ruin Zimbabwe's forests

01 Nov 2022  |  ipsnoticias.net
In the central Zimbabwe province of Mashonaland, informal gold miners like Patrick Makwati and Sybeth Mwendauya are contributing to deforestation by cutting down trees to process gold. They claim they cannot afford coal and lack access to electricity. Zimbabwe loses 262,000 hectares of trees annually, with illegal gold mining accounting for 30% of this loss, according to environmental activist Monalisa Mafambirei. Government officials acknowledge the widespread problem, and environmental advocates like Gibson Mawere blame artisanal miners for exacerbating deforestation. Miners argue that formal employment would alleviate the issue, but until then, forests will continue to suffer.

Zimbabwe: Artisanal Miners Ruining Already Diminishing Forests in Zimbabwe

30 Oct 2022  |  allafrica.com
In Mazowe village, Zimbabwe, illegal gold miners like Patrick Makwati and Sybeth Mwendauya are contributing to deforestation by cutting down trees to process gold ore, as they cannot afford coal or access electricity. The Forestry Commission reports that Zimbabwe loses 262,000 hectares of trees annually, with 30% attributed to illegal mining. Environmental activists, including Monalisa Mafambirei and Gibson Mawere, criticize the miners for exacerbating deforestation. The miners, however, point to the lack of formal employment and the struggling economy as the root causes of their actions. They argue that without jobs, they have no choice but to continue their practices to earn a living, despite the environmental damage.

Artisanal Miners Ruining Already Diminishing Forests in Zimbabwe

29 Oct 2022  |  ipsnews.net
In Mazowe village, Zimbabwe, illegal artisanal gold miners are contributing to deforestation by cutting down trees to process gold ore. Patrick Makwati and Sybeth Mwendauya, two such miners, use woodfire for processing gold due to the high cost of coal and lack of access to electricity. The Forestry Commission reports that Zimbabwe loses 262,000 hectares of trees annually, with illegal mining accounting for a significant portion of this loss. Environmental activists and government officials acknowledge the problem, which is exacerbated by the country's economic struggles. Miners like Makwati argue that without formal employment, they have no choice but to continue this practice, which is detrimental to the environment.

Zimbabwe: Poverty Haunts Resettled Farmers in Zimbabwe

18 Oct 2022  |  allafrica.com
The article discusses the plight of resettled farmers in Zimbabwe, focusing on individuals like Edious Murewa and Nyson Dewa, who are facing poverty after seizing land from white commercial farmers during the country's land reform program initiated by the late President Robert Mugabe. Despite receiving agricultural inputs from the government, these farmers struggle with poor yields due to climate change and a lack of technical farming skills. The article highlights the political dynamics, as support for the ruling party ZANU-PF or the opposition CCC influences access to resources. It also touches on the reliance on charity, traditional healers, and self-styled prophets for assistance and weather predictions, which often prove futile.

Poverty Pursues Resettled Farmers in Zimbabwe

17 Oct 2022  |  ipsnoticias.net
Resettled farmers in Zimbabwe, like Edious Murewa and Nyson Dewa, are facing poverty years after the chaotic land seizures from white commercial farmers during Robert Mugabe's Fast Track Land Reform Programme. Despite receiving agricultural inputs such as fertilizers and maize seeds, these farmers have been unsuccessful, leading to a reliance on charity and government maize meal donations. Murewa, coerced to vote for ZANU-PF to retain his land, and Dewa, denied government support due to his opposition affiliation, exemplify the struggles faced by many. Climate change experts attribute their agricultural failures to unpredictable weather patterns, while agricultural experts blame a lack of technical knowledge. The land reform has not improved lives, with some living in slums on the farms they invaded.

Poverty Haunts Resettled Farmers in Zimbabwe

17 Oct 2022  |  ipsnews.net
The article discusses the plight of resettled farmers in Zimbabwe, focusing on individuals like Edious Murewa and Nyson Dewa, who are facing poverty after having seized land from white commercial farmers during the country's land reform program initiated by the late President Robert Mugabe. Despite receiving agricultural inputs from the government, these farmers struggle with poor yields due to drought and a lack of technical farming skills. The ruling party, ZANU-PF, provides food handouts, which influences the farmers' voting preferences. The opposition party, CCC, is mentioned as a factor in the denial of farming inputs to some farmers. Climate change and the lack of understanding of weather patterns are cited as exacerbating factors in the farmers' inability to succeed, and the article includes comments from experts and local figures on the issue.

Famed novelist Tsitsi Dangarembga convicted in Zimbabwe after peaceful protest

29 Sep 2022  |  theglobeandmail.com
Tsitsi Dangarembga, a renowned Zimbabwean writer, has been convicted of 'inciting public violence' after participating in a silent protest in Harare in 2020. The trial has highlighted the increasing suppression of freedoms under President Emmerson Mnangagwa's regime. Dangarembga, who has faced over 30 court appearances since her arrest, sees the case as an intimidation tactic to silence dissent. Alongside journalist Julie Barnes, Dangarembga was charged with incitement and violating COVID-19 measures, receiving a six-month suspended sentence and a fine. The verdict has been widely criticized by opposition figures, civil society activists, and international organizations like PEN International as a miscarriage of justice and an attack on the right to free expression. Dangarembga's literary work, including her Booker Prize-shortlisted novel 'This Mournable Body', has been influential, and she was awarded the Peace Prize of the German Book Trade for her artistic and civil liberties advocacy.

Elder Abuse and Economic Misery: Zimbabwe's Senior Citizens Face Harsh Realities

29 Sep 2022  |  allafrica.com
The article discusses the prevalent issue of elder abuse in Zimbabwe, highlighting the case of 86-year-old Tinago Murape who is mistreated by his grandchildren. They accuse him of witchcraft, which they believe is the cause of their unemployment and economic hardships. Murape's wife and children have passed away, leaving him dependent on his abusive grandchildren and the charity of neighbors. The article also mentions the case of 76-year-old Agness Murambiwa, a victim of rape by her grandson. HelpAge Zimbabwe's director, Priscilla Gavi, notes that older people are often wrongly accused of witchcraft and face various forms of abuse, including physical harm and sexual assault. The article points out that with 90 percent unemployment in Zimbabwe and no social grants for the elderly, many senior citizens are vulnerable to abuse and have limited means to defend themselves. The Zimbabwean Constitution protects the elderly, but the reality is grim due to economic challenges, including high inflation rates.

Elderly Abuse Plagues Zimbabwe's Seniors

28 Sep 2022  |  ipsnoticias.net
In Zimbabwe, elderly individuals like 86-year-old Tinago Murape are facing abuse from their own family members, with accusations of witchcraft leading to physical and emotional mistreatment. Murape's grandchildren, who live with him, deny the allegations of starving and locking him up, attributing his claims to old age. The issue of elder abuse is widespread in Zimbabwe, with the police handling 900 cases in 2021 alone. Elderly women are also victims of sexual abuse, as in the case of 76-year-old Agness Murambiwa, who reported being raped by her grandson. HelpAge's director in Zimbabwe, Priscilla Gavi, acknowledges the unjust accusations of witchcraft against the elderly and the increasing incidents of elder abuse. With no social subsidies for seniors and a high inflation rate exacerbating the situation, many elderly Zimbabweans are left vulnerable and dependent on their abusers for care.

More Than 700 Children Have Died in a Measles Outbreak in Zimbabwe

24 Sep 2022  |  www.nytimes.com
A measles outbreak in Zimbabwe has resulted in over 700 child fatalities and more than 6,500 infections, exacerbated by a decline in routine immunization during the Covid-19 pandemic. The World Health Organization and UNICEF have highlighted a global backslide in childhood vaccinations due to pandemic-related disruptions, armed conflicts, and other challenges, posing significant risks to child health, especially in poorer countries. Zimbabwe's public health system has been weakened by a prolonged political and economic crisis, further impacting vaccination efforts.

Many African countries are toughening pandemic restrictions in the face of a Covid surge.

26 Dec 2021  |  www.nytimes.com
African countries are experiencing a surge in COVID-19 cases, with Kenya's positivity rate reaching over 30%, and nearly 50 Ugandan lawmakers testing positive after a sports event. Zimbabwe has implemented new restrictions due to rising infections. The Omicron variant, first detected in southern Africa, is causing concern as it spreads rapidly, though resulting in fewer deaths and hospitalizations than the Delta variant. Travel restrictions are being imposed by various countries, including the United Arab Emirates. The Africa CDC reports that at least 21 African countries are in a fourth wave, with Algeria, Kenya, and Mauritius in a fifth wave.

Many African Countries Toughen Covid Restrictions as Fourth Wave Spreads

25 Dec 2021  |  www.nytimes.com
African countries are experiencing a surge in COVID-19 cases, with Kenya's positivity rate reaching over 30%, and nearly 50 Ugandan lawmakers testing positive after a sports event. Zimbabwe has implemented new restrictions on businesses and travelers. The Omicron variant, first detected in southern Africa, is highly contagious but has caused fewer deaths and hospitalizations than the Delta variant. Despite some countries lifting travel bans on southern African states, the United Arab Emirates has introduced new travel restrictions for travelers from several African countries.

U.S. Officials Pledge Almost $200 Million to Track Variants as Lawmakers Push for More

17 Feb 2021  |  www.nytimes.com
The Biden administration announced a new initiative to invest nearly $200 million to enhance the identification of COVID-19 variants. This investment aims to increase the number of positive virus samples labs can sequence, with the CDC hoping to contribute 25,000 genomes a week. The effort is part of a broader strategy to address the threat of more contagious variants, with the B.1.1.7 variant already present in 42 states. The FDA is also preparing for a potential redesign of vaccines to combat new variants. Additionally, the White House and other departments are investing in testing, including for schools and underserved settings. Lawmakers are proposing a $1.75 billion program for genomic sequencing as part of an economic relief package. President Biden's goal of 100 million vaccine shots in his first 100 days is likely to be met ahead of schedule, with the pace of vaccinations increasing.

Biden Officials Confront U.S. Vaccination Woes

24 Jan 2021  |  www.nytimes.com
Biden officials are addressing public expectations and challenges related to the COVID-19 vaccine distribution in the U.S. Dr. Anthony Fauci emphasized that President Biden's goal of 100 million shots is a floor, not a ceiling, and clarified that it refers to doses, not fully vaccinated individuals. The administration is working to improve the vaccine distribution infrastructure and is awaiting trial results for the Johnson & Johnson one-dose vaccine. Mexico's president, Andrés Manuel López Obrador, announced he contracted COVID-19 but will continue his duties, despite his history of downplaying the pandemic.

Zimbabwe's Foreign Minister Dies From Covid

20 Jan 2021  |  www.nytimes.com
Zimbabwe’s foreign minister, Sibusiso Busi Moyo, has died from Covid-19 complications, becoming the fourth high-ranking official in the country to succumb to the virus. Moyo, known for his role in the 2017 military coup that ended Robert Mugabe’s rule, was a key figure in President Emmerson Mnangagwa’s cabinet. The country has seen a recent spike in Covid-19 cases, prompting new lockdown measures.

The story is a detailed account about underage children who have of late taken to smoking tobacco.

‘We’d Prefer the Food’: Zimbabwe Fears a Famine Is in Its Future

25 Dec 2019  |  www.nytimes.com
In Harare, Zimbabwe, citizens faced disappointment when the government-run Grain Marketing Board depot announced that its supply of subsidized maize meal was rotten and not for sale. The crowd of 150 people, who had been waiting for hours, reacted with disbelief and anger to the news. The incident highlights the economic struggles in Zimbabwe, where inflation is rampant and the local currency is rapidly devaluing, making life increasingly difficult for the populace. Benjamini Dunha, a plumber, expressed his frustration over the rising cost of living and the lack of price controls, while another shopper, Nyasha Domboka, questioned the sudden spoilage of the maize meal.

Robert Mugabe, Even in Death, Divides Zimbabwe

13 Sep 2019  |  www.nytimes.com
Robert Mugabe's death has sparked a dispute between his family and the Zimbabwean government over his burial site. Mugabe's family wanted a private burial in his home village, while the government preferred a public burial at the National Heroes Acre in Harare. A compromise was reached to hold a private ceremony at Heroes Acre, with a government ceremony planned for Sunday and a private burial to follow.

A Music Genre Grows in Zimbabwe, Fueled by Rage Against Authority

07 Sep 2019  |  www.nytimes.com
Zimdancehall, a music genre in Zimbabwe, has become an outlet for expressing public discontent with the government. The genre, influenced by reggae, reflects the struggles of young people in Zimbabwe, including violence, poverty, and shortages of essentials. The article highlights an incident where singer Winky D was attacked by assailants believed to be linked to President Emmerson D. Mnangagwa's party, ZANU-PF, suggesting a climate of intimidation against artists. The narrative of Zimbabwe's decline since the fall of Robert Mugabe is interwoven with the rise of Zimdancehall as a voice for the marginalized.

A Coup Offered Hope to Zimbabwe. Has Its New President Delivered?

10 Aug 2019  |  www.nytimes.com
President Emmerson D. Mnangagwa, who took power in Zimbabwe through a 2017 coup, is increasingly imposing his rule, reminiscent of his predecessor Robert G. Mugabe's autocratic governance. Despite being marketed as a break from Mugabe's 37 years of economic mismanagement and autocracy, Mnangagwa's tenure has seen a rise in charges against government critics, raising concerns about his leadership and human rights in Zimbabwe.

In Zimbabwe, the Water Taps Run Dry and Worsen ‘a Nightmare’

31 Jul 2019  |  www.nytimes.com
Harare, Zimbabwe's capital, is facing a severe water crisis, with more than half of the city's 4.5 million residents having access to running water only once a week. Eneres Kaitano, a local jeans wholesaler, has not had water flow from her taps for five days, causing significant disruptions to her daily life and forcing her to ration toilet use and wait in long lines for water at communal boreholes.

Flooding in Mozambique From Cyclone Idai Made an ‘Inland Ocean,’ Stalling Rescues

19 Mar 2019  |  www.nytimes.com
Cyclone Idai caused significant flooding in central Mozambique, creating an 'inland ocean' and isolating communities. Rescue workers, including those from the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, faced challenges reaching the affected areas due to the swollen rivers. The UN described it as the worst natural disaster in southern Africa in two decades, with people stranded on rooftops and in trees, and homes submerged near river areas.

Is Zimbabwe’s President Showing His True Colors After Violent Protests?

23 Jan 2019  |  www.nytimes.com
Emmerson Mnangagwa, Zimbabwe's president, who initially appeared to signal a gentler leadership after ousting Robert Mugabe, has shown authoritarian tendencies similar to his predecessor. In response to protests against the deteriorating economy, Mnangagwa deployed security forces resulting in deaths and an internet shutdown. Despite his promises of a new Zimbabwe open for business, his actions during the crackdown have drawn significant criticism, undermining efforts to present a reformed image.

Zimbabwe Declares Cholera Emergency as Disease Spreads in Capital

11 Sep 2018  |  www.nytimes.com
A cholera outbreak in Zimbabwe has resulted in at least 20 deaths and 2,000 illnesses over the past week, prompting the health minister, Obadiah Moyo, to declare a state of emergency in Harare. The outbreak is attributed to blocked sewers that have not been repaired for months. The government has suspended classes in some suburbs and is working to repair the sewer systems. The disease has spread to other provinces, including Masvingo and Manicaland. Cholera, a bacterial disease spread through contaminated water or food, can be fatal if not treated promptly with fluids and antibiotics.

Zimbabwe Court Upholds Results of Presidential Election

24 Aug 2018  |  www.nytimes.com
The Zimbabwe Constitutional Court rejected the opposition's call to annul the presidential election results, confirming Emmerson Mnangagwa of ZANU-PF as the winner with 50.8% of the vote. The court's unanimous decision, citing lack of evidence for fraud, aligns with international and domestic observers' assessments of a generally free and peaceful election. This ruling paves the way for Mnangagwa's swearing-in within 48 hours.

Arrest of Zimbabwe Opposition Leader Raises Fears of Crackdown

09 Aug 2018  |  www.nytimes.com
Tendai Biti, a senior leader of Zimbabwe's opposition party, was arrested and charged with inciting public violence and violating election law after being deported from Zambia. He was released on bail by magistrate Francis Mapfumo. The arrest follows a disputed presidential election won by Emmerson Mnangagwa and raises concerns of a government crackdown. The Movement for Democratic Change, Biti's party, is preparing a legal challenge to the election results. International bodies and foreign missions expressed concern over the treatment of opposition supporters and the respect for human rights.

Zimbabwe Elects Mnangagwa, the Man Who Ousted Mugabe

02 Aug 2018  |  www.nytimes.com
Zimbabwe's recent election, the first without Robert Mugabe on the ballot, was marred by violence and allegations of vote rigging. Emmerson Mnangagwa, who replaced Mugabe after a military coup, faced criticism for deploying soldiers against opposition supporters, resulting in deaths and unrest. Despite initial optimism, the election's integrity was questioned, with international observers criticizing the process and opposition leader Nelson Chamisa prematurely claiming victory. The ruling party's parliamentary win and the subsequent crackdown on protests highlighted ongoing political tensions in Zimbabwe.

Zimbabwe Protests Turn Violent as Some Call Election a Sham

01 Aug 2018  |  www.nytimes.com
Zimbabwe's recent election, the first without Robert Mugabe on the ballot, has led to violent protests in Harare. Initial optimism turned to fear as the ruling party, led by Emmerson Mnangagwa, faced accusations of vote rigging and intimidation, particularly in rural areas. Opposition leader Nelson Chamisa prematurely claimed victory, leading to celebrations and subsequent clashes with soldiers, resulting in at least three deaths. International observers criticized the election process, and the city remains tense as it awaits the official results.

As Zimbabwe Prepares to Vote, Robert Mugabe Resurfaces With a Message

29 Jul 2018  |  www.nytimes.com
As Zimbabwe approaches its first general election without Robert Mugabe since independence, opposition candidate Batandai Masunda campaigns freely, a significant change from past elections marked by ZANU-PF's intimidation. Despite the peaceful campaigning, there are concerns about potential vote-rigging by ZANU-PF's candidate, Emmerson Mnangagwa, who played a key role in Mugabe's ousting. The election represents a critical moment for Zimbabwe's political future.

Mugabe Has Left, but His Legacy Haunts Zimbabwe’s Election

19 Jul 2018  |  www.nytimes.com
Zimbabwe's first elections since Robert G. Mugabe's resignation are overshadowed by his legacy, with his former party ZANU-PF represented by Emmerson Mnangagwa, who faces accusations of past brutal repression. The opposition, led by Nelson Chamisa, is weakened and divided following Morgan Tsvangirai's death. Concerns of violence, intimidation, and vote tampering persist, and the economy remains crippled by debt, high unemployment, and inequality. Despite Mnangagwa's openness to international election observers, skepticism about a fair vote remains, with reports of military presence and potential misuse of biometric voter registration technology. The political landscape is marked by internal divisions within both ZANU-PF and the opposition, reflecting the challenges of transitioning from Mugabe's long-standing rule.

For First Time Since Mugabe’s Ouster, Zimbabwe to Hold Elections in July

30 May 2018  |  www.nytimes.com
Zimbabwe's new leader, Emmerson Mnangagwa, has announced that the country will hold its first elections since the ouster of Robert G. Mugabe on July 30. This marks the first election in a generation without Mugabe, who resigned in November following impeachment proceedings. The election follows the death of Mugabe's rival, Morgan Tsvangirai, and will feature Mnangagwa against several opponents, including Nelson Chamisa of the Movement for Democratic Change party. Mnangagwa has invited international observers, including from the EU and the Commonwealth, breaking from Mugabe's tradition.

Roy Bennett, White Zimbabwean With Black Political Base, Dies in U.S. Helicopter Crash

18 Jan 2018  |  www.nytimes.com
Roy Bennett, a white Zimbabwean politician and former coffee grower, died at age 60 in a helicopter crash in New Mexico. Bennett, whose farm was seized in Zimbabwe's land redistribution program, was a key figure in the Movement for Democratic Change, the main opposition party to President Robert G. Mugabe. Fluent in Shona and respected for his local philanthropy, Bennett was imprisoned for assault in 2004 and later fled to South Africa, returning to Zimbabwe in 2008. He was acquitted of treason in 2010 and spent his later years farming in Zambia and South Africa. His death comes after Mugabe's resignation and the rise of Emmerson Mnangagwa, who has promised free elections. Bennett is survived by his daughter and son, and is remembered as a patriot by human rights lawyer Beatrice Mtetwa.

Zimbabwe’s New Leader Stirs Fears That He Resembles the Old One

24 Nov 2017  |  www.nytimes.com
Robert Mugabe, Zimbabwe's former leader, has died at 95. His 37-year rule was marked by tactics typical of dictators, including military deployment against civilians and political opponents, and seizing white-owned farms without compensation. Mugabe's ouster in 2017 ended with Emmerson Mnangagwa, his former vice president, taking power, raising concerns of similar leadership. Mugabe's legacy is complex, seen as a pariah for his despotism but also respected in Africa for his role in Zimbabwe's liberation.

Deputy, Will Be Sworn In as Zimbabwe’s President

22 Nov 2017  |  www.nytimes.com
Emmerson Mnangagwa, supported by the military and his political allies, is set to be sworn in as Zimbabwe's new president on Friday after Robert Mugabe's 37-year rule ended. Mnangagwa, who was fired as vice president on November 6, leading to a series of events culminating in Mugabe's resignation, will complete Mugabe's term until the next election due by August. His return to Harare from South Africa marks the country's first power transfer since independence in 1980.

After Coup, Even Mugabe’s Own Party Is Dumping Him

17 Nov 2017  |  www.nytimes.com
Zimbabwe's ruling party, ZANU-PF, initiated steps to expel President Robert Mugabe following a military intervention. The military denied staging a coup, claiming their actions were to address a deteriorating political, social, and economic situation. Mugabe made a public appearance at a university graduation, signaling an attempt to maintain normalcy. The ZANU-PF resolution targeted the G-40 faction and denounced four politicians, but not Grace Mugabe, whose presidential ambitions may have precipitated the crisis. The military and regional mediators are negotiating a peaceful and constitutionally legitimate transition of power.

Zimbabwe, With Mugabe in Custody, Ventures Into Uncharted Territory

16 Nov 2017  |  www.nytimes.com
The Zimbabwean Army detained President Robert Mugabe, leading to negotiations facilitated by South Africa and the Roman Catholic Church for a transitional settlement. Mugabe's dismissal of Vice President Emmerson Mnangagwa and promotion of his wife, Grace Mugabe, precipitated the crisis. Mugabe was under house arrest and seen negotiating with military leaders, but his future and that of his wife remained uncertain. Opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai urged Mugabe to resign, while the Southern African Development Community convened to address the crisis. The military's actions signaled a loss of Mugabe's supreme power, with speculation about a transitional arrangement that includes opposition leaders.

With Mugabe’s Era Ending in Zimbabwe, a Warning Echoes in Africa

15 Nov 2017  |  www.nytimes.com
Zimbabwe's military action against President Robert Mugabe potentially marks the end of his political career and signals a shift away from 'big man' leadership in Africa. Mugabe, at 93, has been Zimbabwe's only leader since independence in 1980, maintaining power through suppression and political maneuvering. His downfall was precipitated by his dismissal of the vice president in favor of his wife, Grace Mugabe, leading to a loss of military loyalty and his subsequent custody. The event resonates across Africa, reflecting the risks of power concentration and the decay of such regimes.

Robert Mugabe Under House Arrest as Rule Over Zimbabwe Teeters

15 Nov 2017  |  www.nytimes.com
Zimbabwe's President Robert Mugabe was placed under house arrest by the military, signaling a potential end to his nearly four-decade rule. The military's takeover occurred peacefully, with tanks positioned around strategic locations in Harare. Despite the uncertainty of Mugabe's removal as president, it is evident that external forces are influencing his destiny, marking a significant shift in the country's political landscape.

Zimbabwe’s Military, in Apparent Takeover, Says It Has Custody of Mugabe

14 Nov 2017  |  www.nytimes.com
Zimbabwe’s military announced it had taken custody of President Robert Mugabe, signaling a potential military takeover. The military assured the public that Mugabe and his family were safe, targeting only those around him accused of causing social and economic suffering. The announcement was made by Maj. Gen. S. B. Moyo, close to the commander of the Zimbabwe Defense Forces, Gen. Constantine Chiwenga. Despite the military presence, daily life in Harare appeared to continue as usual.

In Implicit Rebuke to Mugabe, Zimbabwe’s Military Says It May ‘Step In’

13 Nov 2017  |  www.nytimes.com
Zimbabwe's top military commander, General Constantine Chiwenga, issued a rare warning to President Robert G. Mugabe, suggesting the military might intervene in the escalating political feud within the ruling ZANU-PF party. This follows the recent firing of Vice President Emmerson Mnangagwa, seen as a move to pave the way for Mugabe's wife, Grace, to succeed him. The military's potential involvement recalls past interventions, notably in 2008, and highlights the ongoing disarray and power struggles within Zimbabwe's political landscape.

For Tweet Mocking Mugabe, New Jersey Woman Could Face 20 Years in Prison

09 Nov 2017  |  www.nytimes.com
Martha O'Donovan, an American woman living in Zimbabwe, faces charges of attempting to overthrow the Zimbabwean government with a tweet mocking President Robert Mugabe. She could be sentenced to up to 20 years in prison. Her arrest has sparked concerns over increased social media control by the Zimbabwean government ahead of the 2018 national elections. However, High Court Judge Clement Phiri granted her bail, citing a lack of evidence for a plot to overthrow the government. O'Donovan has surrendered her passport and is awaiting a trial date.

Zimbabwe’s First Lady Said to Seek Diplomatic Immunity Over Assault Claim

16 Aug 2017  |  www.nytimes.com
Grace Mugabe, Zimbabwe's first lady, is seeking diplomatic immunity after being accused of assaulting Gabriella Engels, a young model, in a Johannesburg hotel room. Engels claims Mugabe attacked her with an extension cord upon finding her with Mugabe's sons. The South African government is involved in addressing the diplomatic immunity request.

Robert Mugabe Seizes on the Latest Political Threat to His Zimbabwe: WhatsApp

03 Oct 2016  |  www.nytimes.com
Rev. Evan Mawarire, a pastor turned social media activist, galvanized widespread protests against President Robert Mugabe in Zimbabwe through his posts on Facebook and Twitter. The Zimbabwean government, recognizing the threat posed by social media, responded with a crackdown, including jailing Mawarire and raising cellphone data prices to curb the use of platforms like WhatsApp for organizing opposition. Mawarire has since fled to the United States, while the government continues to suppress social media-driven dissent.

A.N.C.’s Combative Response to Election Losses Startles South Africa

06 Sep 2016  |  www.nytimes.com
Following significant losses in the August 3 municipal elections, the African National Congress (A.N.C.) in South Africa, led by President Jacob Zuma, has faced criticism for failing to engage in promised introspection. Instead, Zuma and his allies have tightened control over state enterprises and targeted Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan, known for his anti-corruption efforts. This has led to increased public suspicion and internal calls for Zuma's resignation, with concerns that his continued leadership could further damage the party's reputation and future.

Protesters Fume as Zimbabwe Vice President Runs Up a Hotel Bill

28 Jul 2016  |  www.nytimes.com
In Zimbabwe, amidst a cash shortage and delayed payments for police and army, Vice President Phelekezela Mphoko has spent nearly 600 nights in a luxury hotel's presidential suite at taxpayer expense. Protests have erupted outside the Rainbow Towers, with demonstrators like Sten Zvorwadza demanding Mphoko's departure from the hotel. The vice president's refusal to move into official residences, citing various inadequacies, has fueled public outrage and demonstrations.

Strikes and Protests Bring Zimbabwe’s Capital to a Halt

07 Jul 2016  |  www.nytimes.com
Zimbabwe's capital, Harare, and other cities experienced a shutdown as citizens protested the government's poor management of the economy, signaling rising discontent with President Robert Mugabe's 36-year leadership. The protests, which included barricades and clashes with police, were part of a larger expression of frustration as the government failed to pay civil servants their June salaries. The situation has exacerbated political infighting and instability in Zimbabwe.
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