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Jorgen Samso

Beograd, Serbia
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About Jorgen
Jorgen Samso is a filmmaker and journalist based in Belgrade, Serbia, covering the Balkans. Video, TV, print/online and photography. Clients: PBS, Euronews, The Lancet, Foreign Policy, Politico Europe, Balkan Investigative Reporting Network (BIRN) and various Danish national media outlets.
Primary number: +381 64 480 6683 (Serbia)
WhatsApp: +1 646 240 0747
Viber: +45 6168 3732
Languages
Danish German English
+3
Services
Video Package (Web / Broadcast) Interview (Video / Broadcast) Vox Pop
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Skills
Business Politics Current Affairs
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Portfolio

Rwanda’s economy is booming, but at what cost?

01 Oct 2023  |  PBS.org
Rwanda's rapid economic growth and improved public services are overshadowed by serious human rights abuses and political repression under President Paul Kagame. Critics, including former government officials and human rights advocates, highlight instances of torture, unlawful killings, and suppression of political opposition. Despite international praise for Rwanda's development, the U.S. State Department and Human Rights Watch report significant human rights violations. Kagame's supporters argue that his strong-arm tactics are necessary for national unity and preventing ethnic conflict, but the legitimacy of his overwhelming electoral victories is questioned.

Health officials work to contain Ebola outbreak in Congo

01 Oct 2023  |  PBS.org
In Beni, Democratic Republic of the Congo, health officials are combating an Ebola outbreak with new experimental drugs and vaccines, despite the region's ongoing conflict. The World Health Organization and other international bodies are involved, but the Congolese government and the UN face criticism for inadequate safety measures. Local and international health workers are striving to contain the virus, even as misinformation and violence complicate their efforts. The story highlights the challenges and progress in treating Ebola, including the recovery of a young patient, Janine, after 22 days of treatment.

Minnesota students come together to bring water to schools in the developing world

01 Oct 2023  |  PBS.org
Minnesota students, led by physical education teacher Ben Butters at Matoska International School, are participating in fundraisers to support water access projects in developing countries. Their efforts have significantly contributed to the Nyaka School in Uganda, which now benefits from a rain collection system. The initiative, supported by the organization H2O for Life, emphasizes community involvement and sustainability. Despite pandemic disruptions, H2O for Life raised $210,000 in the most recent school year, funding 75 water and sanitation projects globally.

Jane Ferguson details career reporting in war zones in memoir 'No Ordinary Assignment'

11 Jul 2023  |  PBS.org
Jane Ferguson, a correspondent known for her war zone reporting, discusses her memoir 'No Ordinary Assignment' on PBS NewsHour. She reflects on her upbringing in Northern Ireland during the Troubles, her career covering conflicts like the Syrian uprising and the U.S. war in Afghanistan, and her close calls, including leaving Homs before Marie Colvin's death and departing Kabul just before the Abbey Gate bombing. Ferguson expresses gratitude for her life and remains optimistic despite witnessing suffering, emphasizing the importance of covering underreported stories.

Rescuers face increasingly long odds as death toll soars in Turkey and Syria

11 Feb 2023  |  PBS.org
Rescue workers in Turkey and Syria are facing increasingly difficult conditions as they search for survivors following devastating earthquakes. In Adiyaman, Turkey, international teams, including a 200-strong team from USAID, are working tirelessly amidst widespread destruction. Stephen Allen of USAID describes the scale of the disaster as unprecedented. In Hatay, miraculous rescues continue, but hope is fading for many. Turkish officials are investigating over 130 individuals for allegedly overseeing substandard construction. In Syria, the World Health Organization's Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus highlights the immense need in the war-torn country, where only the White Helmets are conducting rescue operations. Survivors recount harrowing experiences, and the destruction has left many questioning the safety of their homes.

Misinformation hurts effort to immunize children in Democratic Republic of the Congo

28 Nov 2022  |  pbs.org
The COVID-19 pandemic has led to a significant decline in routine childhood immunizations worldwide, with over 25 million children missing basic vaccines. The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) faces challenges in delivering vaccines due to its size and misinformation, particularly on social media, which has fueled vaccine hesitancy. Efforts to rebuild trust and educate communities, including through U.N. and Ministry of Health campaigns, are underway. Health workers aim to restore immunization rates, emphasizing the importance of vaccines in preventing life-threatening diseases.

Multiple cyclones, historic drought in Madagascar cause widespread food insecurity

22 Feb 2022  |  PBS.org
Madagascar is facing severe food insecurity due to multiple cyclones and a historic drought. The World Food Program warns of significant damage to rice crops, the main food source for Malagasy people, leading to increased food prices and malnutrition rates. Madagascar contributes minimally to global carbon emissions, yet it is disproportionately affected by climate change. President Andry Rajoelina has called for support from high-emission countries. The country is currently bracing for another cyclone, with the tropical storm season lasting until May.

Remembering Paul Farmer, a giant in the world of public health

21 Feb 2022  |  PBS.org
Dr. Paul Farmer, a renowned physician and anthropologist, passed away, leaving a significant legacy in global health. Co-founder of Partners In Health, Farmer was instrumental in advocating for equitable healthcare access in developing countries, particularly during the HIV epidemic in Haiti. His efforts influenced the creation of the PEPFAR program, which provided lifesaving drugs to millions. Farmer's holistic and justice-oriented approach to health inspired many, including infectious disease specialist Celine Gounder. His work continues to impact global health practices and policies.

Warming Arctic with less ice heats up Cold War tensions

15 Dec 2021  |  PBS.org
The Arctic is warming at an unprecedented rate, leading to significant geopolitical and military implications. The melting ice is opening new shipping routes and increasing human activity, prompting countries like Russia, Canada, and the U.S. to enhance their military presence and capabilities in the region. NATO is concerned about Russia's increased military activities, while China is investing heavily in Arctic infrastructure. The U.S. faces challenges with its aging icebreaking fleet, highlighting the need for more resources to maintain strategic presence in the Arctic.

COVID-19 exposed our inequities. Long COVID may exacerbate them

25 Aug 2021  |  PBS.org
The U.S. is facing a growing crisis with long COVID, particularly affecting underserved communities. The healthcare system has been slow to recognize and respond to long COVID, leading to inadequate infrastructure and support. The CDC's recent creation of a billable insurance code is a step forward, but many low-income and rural communities still struggle to access care. The pandemic has exacerbated existing healthcare inequities, leaving those hardest hit by COVID-19 with limited options for treatment and support.

On the Ethiopian border, refugees fleeing fighting, famine make for Sudan

20 Jun 2021  |  PBS.org
The ongoing conflict in Ethiopia's Tigray region, initiated by Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed, has led to thousands of deaths and the displacement of 1.7 million people. The United Nations has declared parts of Tigray in famine, prompting calls for a ceasefire. Tens of thousands of Ethiopians have fled to Sudan, where refugee camps face dire conditions. Aid workers and international donors have expressed serious concerns about the management and safety of these camps. Efforts to improve conditions are ongoing but face significant challenges, especially with the approaching rainy season.

The jobs market is slowly recovering, but not so much for women and women of color

08 May 2021  |  PBS.org
The latest jobs report reveals a slower-than-expected recovery in the job market, with women, particularly women of color, facing higher unemployment rates. Valerie Wilson from the Economic Policy Institute highlights the uneven pace of recovery across different racial and ethnic groups, with Black and Latino unemployment rates remaining significantly higher than those of white individuals. The discussion underscores the economic challenges women face, including the gender pay gap and the impact of extended periods out of the workforce.

Russia hits back as US takes lead in Kosovo-Serbia peace talks

18 Jun 2020  |  www.euronews.com
Russia, through Sergei Lavrov, has stated that any peace agreement between Kosovo and Serbia must be approved by the UN Security Council, where it holds veto power. The US has invited both parties to Washington for talks, which has been accepted by Serbia's President Aleksandar Vucic, who also emphasized the necessity of Russia's consent. The EU has been mediating the dialogue for nearly a decade, and the talks are set to resume after Kosovo lifted trade sanctions and Serbia agreed to halt a de-recognition campaign. NATO, through Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg, expressed support for the dialogue and commitment to the KFOR mission in Kosovo.

Fight to Lead Serbia-Kosovo Peace Dialogue

18 Jun 2020  |  es.euronews.com
Serbia is set to hold legislative elections, but the focus is on the resumption of peace talks with Kosovo, which have been stalled for a year and a half. The dialogue, previously led by the EU, has seen renewed diplomatic efforts from the US, with a meeting scheduled at the White House. The EU's role has been challenged by the US's strategic interests in Southeast Europe. NATO, which ended the Kosovo conflict in 1999, remains committed to the KFOR peacekeeping mission and supports the dialogue between Pristina and Belgrade. Both Serbian and Kosovar leaders have expressed their positions on the upcoming peace talks.

Why is the Serbian opposition calling for an election boycott?

14 Jun 2020  |  es.euronews.com
The Serbian opposition, comprising a coalition of nine parties from across the political spectrum, is calling for a boycott of the June 21 elections, citing unfair conditions and government control over media. Dragan Djilas, a key opposition figure, argues that the ruling party's dominance over media prevents fair elections. Freedom House supports these claims, stating that democracy in Serbia is compromised. The Serbian government, represented by Minister Jadranka Joksimović, rejects these criticisms, asserting that democratic processes are in place. The European Union encourages participation in the elections, despite the opposition's boycott. The political climate in Serbia remains tense, with the boycott reflecting broader dissatisfaction with the current state of governance.

As Ebola outbreak fades out, Congo prepares for COVID-19

12 Apr 2020  |  PBS.org
The Democratic Republic of the Congo is transitioning from battling Ebola to preparing for COVID-19. The recent Ebola outbreak, the largest in the country's history, saw significant efforts from health workers, including the use of a new vaccine and community engagement to build trust. Despite setbacks from misinformation and violence, the outbreak is nearly under control. The experience has equipped the community with better knowledge and practices to combat COVID-19, emphasizing the importance of hygiene and contact prevention.

Uganda’s ‘Wakaliwood’ gains international acclaim

06 Jul 2019  |  pbs.org
Wakaliwood, the film industry hub in the slums of Wakaliga, Uganda, has gained international acclaim for its dynamic, low-budget action films. Founded by Isaac Nabwana, who has produced and directed over 40 movies, Wakaliwood is known for its unique blend of action, comedy, and themes drawn from Uganda's history. Despite budgets often under $200, the studio has attracted global attention, with films premiering at the Museum of Modern Art in New York and screened at the Egyptian Theatre in Los Angeles. Actors like Nakibuuka Nashibah balance their passion for acting with other professions, and American Alan Hofmanis, who moved from Brooklyn, now works in the studio. Wakaliwood's success is a testament to the creativity and resourcefulness of its filmmakers.

EU funds help 'open door' Uganda take in refugees from DR Congo

28 Jun 2019  |  www.euronews.com
Uganda's open policy for refugees is highlighted as a positive example by aid organizations, with EU funds supporting Uganda in taking in refugees from the Democratic Republic of the Congo. This initiative may also help slow the migrant flow to Europe.

Serbia smiles eastward as Putin visit builds ties

18 Jan 2019  |  www.euronews.com
Serbia welcomed Russian President Vladimir Putin during his visit to Belgrade, where he signed agreements on military and energy cooperation. Putin criticized Western destabilization in the Balkans, while Serbia aims to join the EU by 2025. Serbia's reliance on Russian gas is a point of leverage for Moscow. Jelena Milic of the Centre for Euro-Atlantic Studies suggests Serbia should balance its energy dependency with closer EU ties. Serbia must resolve its dispute with Kosovo to progress with EU accession. Public sentiment in Serbia shows strong support for Russia, particularly over the Kosovo crisis. Protests against Serbian President Vucic's alleged repression of media and political violence occurred just before Putin's visit, amidst rumors of new elections.

Thousands flood the streets of Belgrade in fourth straight weekend of anti-government protests

30 Dec 2018  |  www.euronews.com
Thousands protested in Belgrade against President Aleksandar Vucic and his government, marking the fourth consecutive weekend of demonstrations. The opposition movement demands electoral reform, media freedom, and an end to what they perceive as autocratic rule. The protests began after an opposition politician was assaulted, and have since grown, with the latest estimates suggesting 50,000 participants. Vucic denies involvement in the attack and is open to calling elections, despite his party's strong lead in polls. The opposition seeks to maintain momentum to influence the government and Vucic, who has shifted from far-right nationalism to pro-European values while maintaining ties with Russia and China.

[THE LANCET] [PHOTOS and contributed reporting] Armed conflict and mistrust risk spreading the “long tail” of the Ebola virus outbreak in the DR Congo. [with Benedict Moran]

New weather supercomputer to be installed in Bologna

14 Nov 2018  |  www.euronews.com
A next-generation supercomputer will be installed in Bologna, Italy, with the capability to predict the weather more accurately, thereby improving preparedness for high-impact weather events.

New hope in the battle against Ebola in the DR Congo’s conflict zone

23 Oct 2018  |  www.euronews.com
Health officials in the Democratic Republic of the Congo are combating the country's tenth Ebola outbreak, with 185 people infected since early August. New medicines and a vaccine are aiding treatment efforts, but the outbreak is complicated by active fighting between the government and over 100 armed groups. The World Health Organisation deems the risk of regional spread very high. In Beni, the epicenter, health workers use a new CUBE system for safer patient care. Over 15,000 people have been vaccinated, and local health workers are being trained to respond independently due to security risks. Despite the challenges, there are successes, such as Janine Mbuka's recovery after 22 days of treatment.

New hope in the battle against Ebola in the DR Congo’s conflict zone

23 Oct 2018  |  euronews.com
Health officials in the Democratic Republic of the Congo are combating the country's tenth Ebola outbreak, with 185 people infected since early August. New medicines and a vaccine are aiding treatment efforts, but the outbreak is complicated by active fighting between the government and over 100 armed groups. The World Health Organisation deems the risk of regional spread very high. In Beni, the epicenter, health workers use a new CUBE system for safer patient care. Over 15,000 people have been vaccinated, and local health workers are being trained to respond independently due to security risks. Despite the challenges, there are successes, such as Janine Mbuka's recovery after 22 days of treatment.

Health officials work to contain Ebola outbreak in Congo

20 Oct 2018  |  www.pbs.org
Health officials in Beni, Democratic Republic of the Congo, are combating an Ebola outbreak with new tools, including experimental drugs and a vaccine. Despite the challenges of an active conflict zone, over 15,000 people have been vaccinated. Health workers are also educating the community and training local nurses to protect themselves. The outbreak is complicated by violence, political instability, and misinformation, with some patients refusing treatment and health workers facing attacks. Amidst this, there are moments of success, such as the recovery of a 13-year-old girl from Ebola.

Juncker visits Kosovo amid EU accession talks

28 Feb 2018  |  www.euronews.com
Jean Claude Juncker visited Pristina, Kosovo, on his tour of the Western Balkans, marking his first official visit there. During the visit, he emphasized the need for a legally binding text for normalizing relations before Kosovo can join the EU, with a deadline set for 2019. Despite aspirations from the six Western Balkan countries to join the EU, the only potential date mentioned for accession is 2025 for Serbia and Montenegro, and not as a guarantee. The upcoming Western Balkan summit in Sofia, Bulgaria, is considered crucial, with expectations for the countries to accelerate internal reforms and resolve bilateral disputes.

Kosovans celebrate 10 years of independence

18 Feb 2018  |  euronews.com
Kosovo celebrated its 10th anniversary of independence from Serbia with street festivities in Pristina and a concert headlined by Rita Ora. Locals expressed joy and optimism, despite the country's challenges with EU entry and non-recognition by Serbia and some EU members. Kosovo's president, Hashim Thaci, anticipates a deal with Serbia that could lead to UN membership.

Kosovans celebrate 10 years of independence

18 Feb 2018  |  www.euronews.com
Kosovo celebrated its 10th anniversary of independence from Serbia with street festivities in Pristina and a concert headlined by Rita Ora. Locals expressed joy and optimism, despite the country's challenges with EU entry and non-recognition by Serbia and some EU members. Kosovo's president, Hashim Thaci, anticipates a deal with Serbia that could lead to UN membership.

Kosovo takes to the streets to celebrate a decade of independence

17 Feb 2018  |  euronews.com
Kosovo celebrated its tenth anniversary of independence with street festivities, including a parade with traditional musicians and a concert by pop star Rita Ora. While the ethnic Albanian majority rejoiced, Serbia and ethnic Serbs in northern Kosovo did not share in the celebration, continuing to contest Kosovo's independence. Over 110 countries recognize Kosovo as a state, but others, including Russia, Spain, and Greece, do not.

Kosovo takes to the streets to celebrate a decade of independence

17 Feb 2018  |  www.euronews.com
Kosovo celebrated its tenth anniversary of independence with street festivities, including a parade with traditional musicians and a concert by pop star Rita Ora. While the ethnic Albanian majority rejoiced, Serbia and ethnic Serbs in northern Kosovo did not share in the celebration, continuing to contest Kosovo's independence. Over 110 countries recognize Kosovo as a state, but others, including Russia, Spain, and Greece, do not.

Shot, edited, produced for Kosovo 2.0, regional magazine, February 2018. Having finished 37th in the Alpine Combined event earlier in the week, Kosovo's only Winter Olympian, Albin Tahiri, will compete in his favored Downhill event tonight — which happens to be his birthday! K2.0 met up with the skier before he flew out to South Korea.

Albin Tahiri: I feel less nervous being the first one than being the only one

09 Feb 2018  |  Kosovo 2.0
The article profiles Albin Tahiri, a 28-year-old athlete from Kosovo, who is set to make history as the country's first Winter Olympian at the 2018 Olympic Winter Games in PyeongChang. Born and raised in Slovenia to a Kosovar Albanian father, Tahiri will compete in all five alpine disciplines. Despite the language barrier, as he does not speak Albanian fluently, he feels accepted as a Kosovar. The article discusses the challenges he faces, including limited support and having to prepare his own equipment. Tahiri's journey to the Olympics began in his childhood, influenced by his father, a former athlete. The significance of his participation is heightened by Kosovo's decade of independence and his own upcoming birthday during the Games. Tahiri's expectations are realistic, focusing on the honor of participation rather than medals.

Serbian Anti-Government Protests Set to Continue

17 Apr 2017  |  www.balkaninsight.com
Anti-government protests in Serbia are expected to resume with full force after a break during the Easter holidays.

Migrants forced to do the Balkan border shuffle

22 Sep 2015  |  politico.eu
Thousands of migrants are being redirected around the Balkans due to competitive border closings by Croatia and Hungary, both aiming to shift the influx of asylum seekers from Serbia. Hungary's border closure with Serbia led to refugees being sent to Croatia, causing tension between the nations. Croatia temporarily closed its border in Tovarnik, leaving 2,000 refugees stranded. The situation has resulted in diplomatic clashes and highlights the lack of a unified EU policy on migration, exacerbating tensions in Central Europe and the Balkans.

Desperation and Chaos at the Hungarian Border as Refugees Continue to Seek Asylum in the EU

05 Sep 2015  |  Foreign Policy
The article reports on the dire conditions faced by refugees in the Roszke camp on the Hungarian border, where many are awaiting registration before they can claim asylum in the EU. The camp has become a flashpoint in Europe's migrant crisis, with overcrowding and inadequate provisions leading to a breakout by some refugees. Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban's hardline stance on immigration and the construction of a fence along the border with Serbia are highlighted as exacerbating the situation. The Hungarian government eventually decided to transport refugees by bus to Austria, easing the immediate tension. The article also touches on the broader EU response to the crisis, including the consideration of a quota system for refugee distribution among member states.
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