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Laurel Chor

Hong Kong, Hong Kong
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About Laurel
Laurel Chor is a freelance photographer, writer and filmmaker based in Hong Kong. She was most recently the Asia reporter/producer for VICE News Tonight on HBO, where her film about Chinese migrant workers won an Overseas Press Club of America award in 2019. Before that, she was the Managing Editor and Multimedia Producer for Coconuts Hong Kong, where her piece about an aspiring rugby referee with a rare skin disease won the SOPA Award for Feature Photography in 2016. She is also a National Geographic grantee.
Languages
English Spanish French
+1
Services
Interview (Video / Broadcast) Vox Pop Documentaries
+9
Skills
Current Affairs Science & Environment Natural Disasters
+2
Portfolio

In Real Life: Mining the Deep Sea

04 Apr 2024  |  scrippsnews.com
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first nation to start deep-sea mining, with its parliament considering opening a section of the Arctic Sea for exploration. The deep sea is rich in minerals like cobalt, essential for the green transition to renewable energy technologies. However, environmentalists and scientists warn of the unknown and potentially catastrophic impacts of such activities on deep-sea ecosystems, which could include pollution and the destruction of habitats. Despite these concerns, some companies and the International Seabed Authority are moving forward with exploration licenses. Major companies like Microsoft, Google, and BMW have pledged not to use deep-sea minerals until environmental safety is assured. Over 20 countries support a moratorium or ban on deep-sea mining due to environmental concerns.

Hong Kong mourns the end of its way of life as China cracks down on dissent

04 Apr 2024  |  nationalgeographic.com
The article describes a scene in Hong Kong where a woman is paying tribute at a makeshift memorial for a deceased protester. The protester was against a proposed extradition bill, which would have permitted the transfer of suspected criminals to mainland China. The memorial features light boxes with messages mourning the loss of the 'One Country, Two Systems' principle and the 'rule of law' in Hong Kong.

Hong Kong's Experience With COVID-19 And School Reopening

04 Apr 2024  |  wwno.org
The article discusses the challenges faced by Hong Kong in reopening schools during the COVID-19 pandemic. Initially, schools were closed due to the outbreak but reopened in late May when the situation seemed under control. Strict sanitary protocols were implemented, and schools received government support and guidelines. Despite no reported cases of infection in schools, a third wave of infections led to the early closure of the school year. The article highlights the city's preparedness due to the experience with the SARS outbreak in 2003, which led to a culture of mask-wearing and hygiene. The government is re-evaluating its COVID-19 strategy, and while the recent school closures are a setback, there have been no outbreaks in schools, partly attributed to the legacy of SARS.

Locking Up The Hong Kong Press — AJ+

04 Apr 2024  |  ajplus.net
The article discusses the closure of Apple Daily, a newspaper known for its support of the pro-democracy movement in Hong Kong and its critical stance against authoritarianism. The author reflects on the paper's controversial history, including its sensationalist journalism and libel suits, but also its role in investigating corruption and social issues. The shutdown of Apple Daily is seen as a symbol of the erosion of press freedom in Hong Kong. The article also covers the recent arrests of pro-democracy activists, including former law professor Benny Tai, and the government's moves that suggest a shift towards a police state. The author emphasizes the importance of the rule of law and justice in society, and the challenges of maintaining democracy, citing the global rise of populist leaders as a concern.

Hong Kong's Experience With COVID-19 Provides A Lesson On School Reopenings

04 Apr 2024  |  wxpr.org
The article discusses the challenges faced by Hong Kong in reopening schools during the COVID-19 pandemic. Initially, schools were closed due to the outbreak but reopened in late May when the situation seemed under control. Hong Kong had implemented strict sanitary protocols in schools, drawing on lessons from the 2003 SARS outbreak. Despite these measures, a third wave of infections led to the early closure of schools again. The Education Bureau's Secretary, Kevin Yeung, acknowledged the absence of school-related infections but cited the recent spike in cases as the reason for the closure. The article highlights the city's preparedness and the various innovative methods schools used to ensure safety and social distancing. It also emphasizes the cultural acceptance of mask-wearing in Hong Kong, stemming from the SARS experience. The article concludes with the uncertainty of the situation as the government re-evaluates its COVID-19 strategy.

Hong Kong’s oceans: amazing but threatened

04 Apr 2024  |  nationalgeographic.com
The article paints a vivid picture of Hong Kong's deep connection with the sea, from its history as a small fishing settlement to its current status as a bustling metropolis with a strong maritime culture. It highlights the importance of the ocean to the city's identity, economy, and recreation, mentioning traditional practices like the Tin Hau Festival and modern sports such as dragon boating and windsurfing. The piece also addresses environmental concerns, noting the threats to marine life from pollution, overfishing, and climate change. It emphasizes the need for conservation efforts, such as reducing plastic use and choosing sustainable seafood, to preserve the ocean and, by extension, Hong Kong's unique heritage and way of life.

Hong Kong Schools Navigate COVID-19 Challenges

04 Apr 2024  |  kalw.org
The article discusses the challenges faced by Hong Kong in reopening schools during the COVID-19 pandemic. Initially, schools were closed due to the outbreak but reopened in late May when the situation seemed under control. Hong Kong's previous experience with SARS in 2003 helped in early adoption of safety measures such as mask-wearing and temperature checks. Despite no cases being reported in schools, a third wave of infections led to the early closure of the school year. The article highlights the extensive safety protocols implemented in schools, the government's support with funding for safety measures, and the adaptability of educators and students to the new normal. It also emphasizes the uncertainty of the pandemic and the balance between normalcy and safety.

In Real Life: Mining the Deep Sea

28 Nov 2023  |  savingseafood.org
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first country to engage in deep-sea mining, with its parliament set to decide on whether to allow exploration in a section of the Arctic Sea. This initiative is driven by the demand for minerals like cobalt, which are essential for the production of batteries for electric vehicles and solar panels, and are abundant in the deep sea. The process involves mining at depths of up to 21,000 feet, where hydrothermal vents release mineral-rich water. However, the prospect of deep-sea mining has raised concerns among scientists and environmentalists, who warn of the potential risks and unknowns associated with opening up a new frontier of mineral extraction in the ocean.

Norway at the Cusp of Deep-Sea Mining Amid Environmental Concerns

27 Nov 2023  |  wxyz.com
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first country to start deep-sea mining, with its parliament set to decide on opening a section of the Arctic Sea for exploration. The deep sea is rich in minerals like cobalt, essential for the green transition to renewable energy technologies. However, scientists and environmentalists are concerned about the potential environmental damage that mining could cause, such as pollution and harm to ecosystems. They argue that the deep ocean is largely unexplored and its ecosystems poorly understood, making it difficult to predict the impacts of commercial mining. Despite these concerns, some countries and companies are interested in the economic potential of deep-sea mining. More than 20 countries support a moratorium or ban on the practice, and companies like Microsoft, Google, and BMW have pledged not to use deep-sea minerals until environmental protection can be assured. The International Seabed Authority has granted exploration licenses in international waters but has yet to decide on actual mining operations.

Norway at the Cusp of Deep-Sea Mining Amid Environmental Concerns

27 Nov 2023  |  kristv.com
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first nation to start deep-sea mining, with its parliament set to decide on opening a section of the Arctic Sea for exploration. The deep sea is rich in minerals like cobalt, essential for the green transition to renewable energy technologies. However, scientists and environmentalists are concerned about the potential environmental damage, including pollution and harm to ecosystems, which could result from mining activities. The deep ocean's ecology is not fully understood, raising fears of irreversible impacts. Despite these concerns, the International Seabed Authority has granted exploration licenses, and countries like Norway are considering moving forward with mining in their territorial waters. Major companies have pledged not to use deep-sea minerals until environmental safety is assured, and over 20 countries support a moratorium or ban on deep-sea mining.

Trending stories at Scrippsnews.com

27 Nov 2023  |  krtv.com
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first nation to start deep-sea mining, with its parliament considering opening a section of the Arctic Sea for exploration. The deep sea is rich in minerals like cobalt, essential for the green transition to produce batteries for electric vehicles and solar panels. However, scientists and environmentalists are concerned about the unknown environmental impacts, including potential damage to ecosystems and species extinction. Despite these concerns, the International Seabed Authority has issued exploration licenses in international waters. More than 20 countries support a moratorium or ban on deep-sea mining, and companies such as Microsoft, Google, and BMW have pledged not to use deep-sea minerals until environmental safety is assured.

Norway at the Cusp of Deep-Sea Mining Amid Environmental Concerns

27 Nov 2023  |  denver7.com
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first nation to start deep-sea mining, with its parliament set to decide on opening a section of the Arctic Sea for exploration. The deep sea is rich in minerals like cobalt, essential for the green transition to renewable energy technologies. However, scientists and environmentalists are concerned about the potential environmental damage, as the deep ocean's ecosystems are not fully understood and mining could lead to the destruction of these areas and the extinction of unique species. Despite these concerns, the International Seabed Authority has issued exploration licenses, and companies such as Microsoft, Google, and BMW have pledged not to use deep-sea minerals until environmental safety is assured. Over 20 countries support a moratorium or ban on deep-sea mining.

Norway at the Cusp of Deep-Sea Mining: Environmental Concerns and the Green Transition

27 Nov 2023  |  kztv10.com
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first nation to start deep-sea mining, with its parliament set to decide on opening a section of the Arctic Sea for exploration. The deep sea is rich in minerals like cobalt, essential for the green transition to renewable energy technologies. However, scientists and environmentalists are concerned about the potential environmental damage, as the deep ocean's ecosystems are not fully understood and mining could lead to the destruction of these areas and the extinction of unique species. Despite these concerns, the International Seabed Authority has issued exploration licenses in international waters. More than 20 countries support a moratorium on deep-sea mining, and companies such as Microsoft, Google, and BMW have pledged not to use deep-sea minerals until environmental safety is assured.

Norway at the Cusp of Pioneering Deep-Sea Mining Amid Environmental Concerns

27 Nov 2023  |  3newsnow.com
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first nation to start deep-sea mining, with its parliament considering opening a section of the Arctic Sea for exploration. The deep sea is rich in minerals like cobalt, essential for the green transition to renewable energy technologies. However, scientists and environmentalists are concerned about the potential environmental damage, including pollution and harm to ecosystems, which could result from mining activities. The deep ocean's ecology is not fully understood, raising fears of irreversible impacts. While over 20 countries support a moratorium or ban on deep-sea mining, companies such as Microsoft, Google, and BMW have pledged not to use deep-sea minerals until environmental safety is assured. Despite this, the International Seabed Authority has granted exploration licenses in international waters, with decisions on actual mining still pending.

Norway at the Cusp of Deep-Sea Mining: Environmental Concerns and the Green Transition

27 Nov 2023  |  wtvr.com
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first nation to start deep-sea mining, with its parliament considering opening a section of the Arctic Sea for exploration. The deep sea is rich in minerals like cobalt, essential for the green transition to renewable energy technologies. However, scientists and environmentalists are concerned about the potential environmental damage, as the deep ocean's ecosystems are not fully understood and mining could lead to the destruction of these areas and the extinction of unique species. The article also notes that over 20 countries support a moratorium on deep-sea mining, and companies such as Microsoft, Google, and BMW have pledged not to use deep-sea minerals until environmental safety is assured. The International Seabed Authority has granted exploration licenses but has yet to decide on actual mining operations.

Norway at the Cusp of Deep-Sea Mining Amid Environmental Concerns

27 Nov 2023  |  kxlf.com
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first country to engage in deep-sea mining, with its parliament considering opening a section of the Arctic Sea for exploration. The deep sea is rich in minerals like cobalt, crucial for the green transition to renewable energy technologies. However, scientists and environmentalists are concerned about the potential environmental damage, as the deep ocean's ecosystems are not fully understood and mining could lead to the destruction of these areas and the extinction of species. Despite these concerns, the International Seabed Authority has issued exploration licenses in international waters. More than 20 countries support a moratorium or ban on deep-sea mining, and companies such as Microsoft, Google, and BMW have pledged not to use deep-sea minerals until environmental safety is assured.

Norway at the Cusp of Deep-Sea Mining: Environmental Concerns and the Green Transition

27 Nov 2023  |  kshb.com
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first nation to start deep-sea mining, with its parliament set to decide on opening a section of the Arctic Sea for exploration. The deep sea is rich in minerals like cobalt, essential for the green transition to renewable energy technologies. However, scientists and environmentalists are concerned about the potential environmental damage, as the deep ocean's ecosystems are not fully understood and mining could lead to the destruction of these areas and the extinction of unique species. Despite these concerns, the International Seabed Authority has issued exploration licenses in international waters. Major companies such as Microsoft, Google, and BMW have pledged not to use deep-sea minerals until environmental safety is assured. Over 20 countries support a moratorium or ban on deep-sea mining.

Norway at the Cusp of Deep-Sea Mining Amid Environmental Concerns

27 Nov 2023  |  news5cleveland.com
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first nation to start deep-sea mining, with its parliament set to decide on opening a section of the Arctic Sea for exploration. The deep sea is rich in minerals like cobalt, essential for the green transition to renewable energy technologies. However, scientists and environmentalists are concerned about the unknown ecological impacts of such mining activities. They warn of potential significant damage to ecosystems and the loss of species, as well as effects on fisheries, climate regulation, and carbon storage. Despite these concerns, some countries and companies are considering deep-sea mining as a solution for mineral demand. More than 20 countries support a moratorium or ban on deep-sea mining, and companies like Microsoft, Google, and BMW have pledged not to use deep-sea minerals until environmental safety is assured. The International Seabed Authority has granted exploration licenses in international waters but has yet to decide on actual mining operations.

Norway at the Cusp of Pioneering Deep-Sea Mining Amid Environmental Concerns

27 Nov 2023  |  fox47news.com
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first nation to start deep-sea mining, with its parliament set to decide on opening a section of the Arctic Sea for exploration. The deep sea is rich in minerals like cobalt, essential for the green transition to renewable energy technologies. However, scientists and environmentalists are concerned about the potential environmental damage, including pollution and harm to ecosystems, which could result from such activities. They argue that the deep ocean's ecology is not well understood and that mining could lead to the destruction of unique species and affect services like fisheries and carbon storage. More than 20 countries support a moratorium or ban on deep-sea mining, and companies such as Microsoft, Google, and BMW have pledged not to use deep-sea minerals until environmental safety is assured. Despite this, the International Seabed Authority has issued exploration licenses in international waters, with decisions on actual mining still pending.

Trending stories at Scrippsnews.com

27 Nov 2023  |  fox4now.com
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first country to start deep-sea mining, with its parliament considering opening a section of the Arctic Sea for exploration. The deep sea is rich in minerals like cobalt, essential for the green transition to renewable energy technologies. However, scientists and environmentalists are concerned about the unknown environmental impacts of such activities, which could damage ecosystems and species, as well as affect climate regulation and carbon storage. Despite these concerns, the International Seabed Authority has issued exploration licenses, and companies like Microsoft, Google, and BMW have pledged not to use deep-sea minerals until environmental safety is assured. Over 20 countries support a moratorium or ban on deep-sea mining.

Norway at the Cusp of Deep-Sea Mining: Environmental Concerns and the Green Transition

27 Nov 2023  |  tmj4.com
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first country to start deep-sea mining, with its parliament set to decide on opening a section of the Arctic Sea for exploration. The deep sea is rich in minerals like cobalt, essential for the green transition to renewable energy technologies. However, scientists and environmentalists are concerned about the potential environmental damage, as the deep ocean's ecosystems are not fully understood and mining could lead to the destruction of these areas and the extinction of unique species. Despite these concerns, the International Seabed Authority has issued exploration licenses in international waters. More than 20 countries support a moratorium on deep-sea mining, and companies such as Microsoft, Google, and BMW have pledged not to use deep-sea minerals until environmental safety is assured.

Norway at the Cusp of Deep-Sea Mining Amid Environmental Concerns

27 Nov 2023  |  ktnv.com
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first country to start deep-sea mining, with its parliament set to decide on opening a section of the Arctic Sea for exploration. The deep sea is rich in minerals like cobalt, essential for the green transition to renewable energy technologies. However, scientists and environmentalists are concerned about the potential environmental damage, as the deep ocean's ecosystems are not fully understood and mining could lead to the destruction of these areas and the extinction of species. Despite these concerns, the International Seabed Authority has issued exploration licenses in international waters. More than 20 countries support a moratorium on deep-sea mining, and companies such as Microsoft, Google, and BMW have pledged not to use deep-sea minerals until environmental safety is assured.

Norway at the Cusp of Deep-Sea Mining: Environmental Concerns and the Green Transition

27 Nov 2023  |  wtxl.com
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first country to engage in deep-sea mining, with its parliament considering opening a section of the Arctic Sea for exploration. The deep sea is rich in minerals like cobalt, crucial for the green transition to renewable energy technologies. However, scientists and environmentalists are concerned about the potential environmental damage, as the deep ocean's ecosystems are not fully understood and mining could lead to the destruction of these areas and the extinction of unique species. The article also notes that over 20 countries support a moratorium on deep-sea mining, and companies such as Microsoft, Google, and BMW have pledged not to use deep-sea minerals until environmental safety is assured. The International Seabed Authority has granted exploration licenses but has yet to decide on actual mining operations.

Norway at the Cusp of Pioneering Deep-Sea Mining Amid Environmental Concerns

27 Nov 2023  |  kgun9.com
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first nation to start deep-sea mining, with its parliament considering opening a section of the Arctic Sea for exploration. The deep sea is rich in minerals like cobalt, essential for the green transition to renewable energy technologies. However, scientists and environmentalists are concerned about the potential environmental damage, as the deep ocean's ecosystems are not fully understood and mining could lead to the destruction of these areas and the extinction of unique species. Despite these concerns, the International Seabed Authority has issued exploration licenses in international waters. More than 20 countries support a moratorium on deep-sea mining, and companies such as Microsoft, Google, and BMW have pledged not to use deep-sea minerals until environmental safety is assured.

Norway at the Cusp of Deep-Sea Mining Amid Environmental Concerns

27 Nov 2023  |  kjrh.com
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first country to start deep-sea mining, with its parliament set to decide on opening a section of the Arctic Sea for exploration. The deep sea is rich in minerals like cobalt, essential for the green transition to renewable energy technologies. However, scientists and environmentalists are concerned about the potential environmental damage, as the deep ocean's ecosystems are not fully understood and mining could lead to the destruction of these areas and the extinction of unique species. Despite these concerns, the International Seabed Authority has issued exploration licenses in international waters. Major companies such as Microsoft, Google, and BMW have pledged not to use deep-sea minerals until environmental safety is assured. Over 20 countries support a moratorium or ban on deep-sea mining.

Norway at the Cusp of Deep-Sea Mining Amid Environmental Concerns

27 Nov 2023  |  wmar2news.com
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first nation to start deep-sea mining, with its parliament set to decide on opening a section of the Arctic Sea for exploration. The deep sea is rich in minerals like cobalt, essential for the green transition to renewable energy technologies. However, scientists and environmentalists are concerned about the potential environmental damage, as the deep ocean's ecosystems are not fully understood and mining could lead to the destruction of these areas and the extinction of unique species. Despite the environmental risks, the International Seabed Authority has issued exploration licenses in international waters. Major companies such as Microsoft, Google, and BMW have pledged not to use deep-sea minerals until environmental safety can be assured. Over 20 countries support a moratorium or ban on deep-sea mining.

Trending stories at Scrippsnews.com

27 Nov 2023  |  wrtv.com
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first country to start deep-sea mining, with its parliament set to decide on opening a section of the Arctic Sea for exploration. The deep sea is rich in minerals like cobalt, essential for the green transition to renewable energy technologies. However, scientists and environmentalists are concerned about the potential environmental damage, including pollution and harm to ecosystems, which could result from mining activities. The deep ocean's ecology is not fully understood, raising fears of irreversible impacts. Despite these concerns, the International Seabed Authority has issued exploration licenses, and countries like Norway are considering moving forward with mining in their territorial waters. Major companies such as Microsoft, Google, and BMW have pledged not to use deep-sea minerals until environmental safety is assured. A global debate continues with some countries and organizations advocating for a moratorium or ban on deep-sea mining.

Trending stories at Scrippsnews.com

27 Nov 2023  |  nbc26.com
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first country to start deep-sea mining, with its parliament set to decide on opening a section of the Arctic Sea for exploration. The deep sea is rich in minerals like cobalt, essential for the green transition to renewable energy technologies. However, scientists and environmentalists are concerned about the unknown environmental impacts of such mining activities. They warn of potential significant damage to ecosystems and the loss of species. While more than 20 countries support a moratorium or ban on deep-sea mining, companies such as Microsoft, Google, and BMW have pledged not to use deep-sea minerals until environmental safety is assured. Despite this, the International Seabed Authority has granted exploration licenses in international waters, and countries like Norway are considering moving forward in their territorial waters.

Trending stories at Scrippsnews.com

27 Nov 2023  |  kivitv.com
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first nation to start deep-sea mining, with its parliament considering opening a section of the Arctic Sea for exploration. The deep sea is rich in minerals like cobalt, essential for the green transition to renewable energy technologies. However, scientists and environmentalists are concerned about the potential environmental damage, as the deep ocean's ecosystems are not well understood and mining could lead to the destruction of habitats and species. Despite these concerns, the International Seabed Authority has issued exploration licenses, and countries like Norway are moving forward with their plans. Meanwhile, over 20 countries support a moratorium on deep-sea mining, and companies such as Microsoft, Google, and BMW have pledged not to use deep-sea minerals until environmental safety is assured.

Norway at the Cusp of Deep-Sea Mining Amid Environmental Concerns

27 Nov 2023  |  wsfltv.com
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first nation to start deep-sea mining, with its parliament considering opening a section of the Arctic Sea for exploration. The deep sea is rich in minerals like cobalt, essential for the green transition to renewable energy technologies. However, scientists and environmentalists are concerned about the potential environmental damage, as the deep ocean's ecosystems are not fully understood and mining could lead to the destruction of these areas and the extinction of unique species. While more than 20 countries support a moratorium or ban on deep-sea mining, and companies such as Microsoft, Google, and BMW have pledged not to use deep-sea minerals until environmental safety is assured, the International Seabed Authority has granted exploration licenses in international waters, and Norway might lead the way in its territorial waters.

Norway at the Cusp of Deep-Sea Mining Amid Environmental Concerns

27 Nov 2023  |  koaa.com
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first country to start deep-sea mining, with its parliament set to decide on opening a section of the Arctic Sea for exploration. The deep sea is rich in minerals like cobalt, essential for the green transition to renewable energy technologies. However, scientists and environmentalists are concerned about the potential environmental damage, as the deep ocean's ecosystems are not fully understood and mining could lead to the destruction of these areas and the extinction of unique species. Despite these concerns, the International Seabed Authority has issued exploration licenses in international waters. Major companies such as Microsoft, Google, and BMW have pledged not to use deep-sea minerals until environmental safety is assured. Over 20 countries support a moratorium or ban on deep-sea mining.

Norway at the Cusp of Deep-Sea Mining Amid Environmental Concerns

27 Nov 2023  |  ktvq.com
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first nation to start deep-sea mining, with its parliament considering opening a section of the Arctic Sea for exploration. The deep sea is rich in minerals like cobalt, essential for the green transition to renewable energy technologies. However, scientists and environmentalists are raising alarms about the potential environmental damage, which could include pollution, sediment plumes, and harm to ecosystems and species, many of which are not yet fully understood. Despite the concerns, the International Seabed Authority has issued exploration licenses in international waters. Major companies such as Microsoft, Google, and BMW have pledged not to use deep-sea minerals until environmental safety can be assured. The article highlights the tension between the pursuit of essential minerals for green technologies and the potential risks to marine environments.

Norway at the Cusp of Deep-Sea Mining Amid Environmental Concerns

27 Nov 2023  |  abc15.com
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first nation to start deep-sea mining, with its parliament considering opening a section of the Arctic Sea for exploration. The deep sea is rich in minerals like cobalt, essential for the green transition to renewable energy technologies. However, scientists and environmentalists are concerned about the environmental impacts, including pollution and potential harm to ecosystems and species. The deep ocean's ecology is not fully understood, raising questions about the wisdom of proceeding with mining. More than 20 countries support a moratorium or ban on deep-sea mining, and companies such as Microsoft, Google, and BMW have pledged not to use deep-sea minerals until environmental protections are assured. The International Seabed Authority has granted exploration licenses in international waters but has yet to decide on actual mining. Norway's decision could set a precedent for other nations.

Trending stories at Scrippsnews.com

27 Nov 2023  |  turnto23.com
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first country to start deep-sea mining, with its parliament considering opening a section of the Arctic Sea for exploration. The deep sea is rich in minerals like cobalt, essential for the green transition to renewable energy technologies. However, scientists and environmentalists are concerned about the unknown environmental impacts of such activities, which could damage ecosystems and species, as well as affect climate regulation and carbon storage. Despite these concerns, some countries and companies are interested in the potential profits. Over 20 countries support a moratorium or ban on deep-sea mining, and companies like Microsoft, Google, and BMW have pledged not to use deep-sea minerals until environmental safety is assured. The International Seabed Authority has granted exploration licenses but has yet to approve actual mining.

Trending stories at Scrippsnews.com

27 Nov 2023  |  10news.com
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first nation to start deep-sea mining, potentially setting a precedent for other countries. The Norwegian parliament is considering whether to allow exploration in a section of the Arctic Sea. Deep-sea mining is sought for minerals like cobalt, essential for the green transition to produce batteries for electric vehicles and solar panels. However, scientists and environmentalists warn of the unknown environmental impacts, including potential damage to ecosystems and loss of biodiversity. Despite these concerns, the International Seabed Authority has issued exploration licenses in international waters. Major companies such as Microsoft, Google, and BMW have pledged not to use deep-sea minerals until environmental safety is assured. Over 20 countries support a moratorium or ban on deep-sea mining.

Norway at the Cusp of Deep-Sea Mining Amid Environmental Concerns

27 Nov 2023  |  kpax.com
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first nation to start deep-sea mining, with its parliament considering opening a section of the Arctic Sea for exploration. The deep sea is rich in minerals like cobalt, crucial for the green transition to renewable energy technologies. However, scientists and environmentalists are concerned about the potential environmental damage, including pollution and harm to ecosystems, which could result from such activities. They argue that the deep ocean's ecology is not well understood and that the impacts of commercial mining are unknown. Despite these concerns, some countries and companies are interested in the economic benefits of deep-sea mining. More than 20 countries support a moratorium or ban on the practice, and companies like Microsoft, Google, and BMW have pledged not to use deep-sea minerals until environmental safety is assured. The International Seabed Authority has granted exploration licenses in international waters but has yet to decide on actual mining operations.

Norway at the Cusp of Deep-Sea Mining Amid Environmental Concerns

27 Nov 2023  |  wcpo.com
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first country to start deep-sea mining, with its parliament set to decide on opening a section of the Arctic Sea for exploration. The deep sea is rich in minerals like cobalt, essential for the green transition to renewable energy technologies. However, scientists and environmentalists are concerned about the unknown ecological impacts of such mining activities. They warn of potential significant damage to ecosystems and the loss of species, as well as effects on fisheries, climate regulation, and carbon storage. While over 20 countries support a moratorium or ban on deep-sea mining, companies like Microsoft, Google, and BMW have pledged not to use deep-sea minerals until environmental protection is assured. Despite these concerns, the International Seabed Authority has granted exploration licenses in international waters, with decisions on actual mining still pending.

Norway at the Cusp of Deep-Sea Mining Amid Environmental Concerns

27 Nov 2023  |  kbzk.com
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first nation to start deep-sea mining, with its parliament set to decide on opening a section of the Arctic Sea for exploration. The deep sea is rich in minerals like cobalt, crucial for the green transition to produce batteries for electric vehicles and solar panels. However, scientists and environmentalists are concerned about the environmental impacts, including pollution and potential harm to ecosystems and species. Despite these concerns, the International Seabed Authority has issued exploration licenses in international waters. More than 20 countries support a moratorium or ban on deep-sea mining, and companies such as Microsoft, Google, and BMW have pledged not to use deep-sea minerals until environmental safety is assured.

Norway at the Cusp of Deep-Sea Mining: Environmental Concerns and the Green Transition

27 Nov 2023  |  wkbw.com
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first nation to start deep-sea mining, with its parliament considering opening a section of the Arctic Sea for exploration. The deep sea is rich in minerals like cobalt, essential for the green transition to renewable energy technologies. However, scientists and environmentalists are concerned about the potential environmental damage, as the deep ocean's ecosystems are not fully understood and mining could lead to the destruction of these areas and the extinction of unique species. Despite these concerns, the International Seabed Authority has issued exploration licenses in international waters. Major companies such as Microsoft, Google, and BMW have pledged not to use deep-sea minerals until environmental safety is assured. Over 20 countries support a moratorium or ban on deep-sea mining.

Trending stories at Scrippsnews.com

27 Nov 2023  |  kxxv.com
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first nation to start deep-sea mining, with its parliament set to decide on opening a section of the Arctic Sea for exploration. The deep sea is rich in minerals like cobalt, essential for the green transition to renewable energy technologies. However, scientists and environmentalists are concerned about the potential environmental damage, as the deep sea's ecosystems are not well understood and mining could lead to the destruction of these areas and the extinction of unique species. Despite these concerns, the International Seabed Authority has issued exploration licenses, and countries like Norway are considering moving forward with mining in their territorial waters. Major companies have pledged not to use deep-sea minerals until environmental safety is assured.

Norway at the Cusp of Deep-Sea Mining: Environmental Concerns and the Race for Ocean Riches

27 Nov 2023  |  newschannel5.com
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first country to start deep-sea mining, with its parliament set to decide on opening a section of the Arctic Sea for exploration. The deep sea is rich in minerals like cobalt, crucial for the green transition to produce batteries for electric vehicles and solar panels. However, scientists and environmentalists are concerned about the potential environmental damage, as the deep ocean's ecosystems are not fully understood and mining could lead to the destruction of these areas and the extinction of species. Despite the environmental risks, the International Seabed Authority has issued exploration licenses in international waters. Major companies such as Microsoft, Google, and BMW have pledged not to use deep-sea minerals until environmental safety is assured. Over 20 countries support a moratorium or ban on deep-sea mining.

Norway at the Cusp of Pioneering Deep-Sea Mining Amid Environmental Concerns

27 Nov 2023  |  lex18.com
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first nation to start deep-sea mining, with its parliament set to decide on allowing exploration in the Arctic Sea. This initiative is driven by the demand for minerals like cobalt, essential for the green transition to produce batteries for electric vehicles and solar panels. However, scientists and environmentalists are raising alarms about the potential environmental damage, as the deep sea's ecosystems are not fully understood and mining could lead to the destruction of these areas and the extinction of unique species. Despite the concerns, the International Seabed Authority has issued exploration licenses in international waters. Major companies such as Microsoft, Google, and BMW have pledged not to use deep-sea minerals until environmental safety is assured. Over 20 countries support a moratorium or ban on deep-sea mining.

Norway at the Cusp of Pioneering Deep-Sea Mining Amid Environmental Concerns

27 Nov 2023  |  fox13now.com
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first nation to start deep-sea mining, with its parliament set to decide on opening a section of the Arctic Sea for exploration. The deep sea is rich in minerals like cobalt, essential for the green transition to renewable energy technologies. However, scientists and environmentalists are concerned about the unknown environmental impacts of such activities, which could damage ecosystems and species on a large scale. They advocate for more research and better technologies for mineral recycling. Over 20 countries support a moratorium or ban on deep-sea mining, and companies like Microsoft, Google, and BMW have pledged not to use deep-sea minerals until environmental safety is assured. The International Seabed Authority has granted exploration licenses but has yet to approve actual mining. Norway's decision could set a precedent for other nations.

Norway at the Cusp of Deep-Sea Mining Amid Environmental Concerns

27 Nov 2023  |  ktvh.com
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first nation to start deep-sea mining, with its parliament considering opening a section of the Arctic Sea for exploration. The deep sea is rich in minerals like cobalt, essential for the green transition to renewable energy technologies. However, scientists and environmentalists are concerned about the environmental impacts, such as pollution and damage to ecosystems, which could lead to the extinction of species and affect services like fisheries and carbon storage. More than 20 countries support a moratorium or ban on deep-sea mining, and companies like Microsoft, Google, and BMW have pledged not to use deep-sea minerals until environmental protection is assured. The International Seabed Authority has granted exploration licenses in international waters but has yet to decide on actual mining.

Norway at the Cusp of Deep-Sea Mining Amid Environmental Concerns

27 Nov 2023  |  katc.com
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first nation to start deep-sea mining, with its parliament considering opening a section of the Arctic Sea for exploration. The deep sea is rich in minerals like cobalt, essential for the green transition to renewable energy technologies. However, scientists and environmentalists are concerned about the unknown ecological impacts of such mining activities. They warn of potential damage to ecosystems and loss of species, as well as effects on fisheries, climate regulation, and carbon storage. While over 20 countries support a moratorium or ban on deep-sea mining, companies like Microsoft, Google, and BMW have pledged not to use deep-sea minerals until environmental safety is assured. Despite this, the International Seabed Authority has granted exploration licenses in international waters, with decisions on actual mining still pending.

Trending stories at Scrippsnews.com

27 Nov 2023  |  ksby.com
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first nation to start deep-sea mining, with its parliament considering opening a section of the Arctic Sea for exploration. The deep sea is rich in minerals like cobalt, essential for the green transition to renewable energy technologies. However, scientists and environmentalists are concerned about the potential environmental damage, including pollution and harm to ecosystems, which could result from mining activities. They argue that the deep ocean's ecology is not well understood and that mining could lead to the loss of biodiversity and affect services such as climate regulation. Despite these concerns, some countries and companies are interested in the economic potential of deep-sea mining. More than 20 countries support a moratorium or ban on the practice, and companies like Microsoft, Google, and BMW have pledged not to use deep-sea minerals until environmental safety is assured. The International Seabed Authority has granted exploration licenses but has yet to decide on actual mining operations.

Norway at the Cusp of Deep-Sea Mining: Environmental Concerns and the Green Transition

27 Nov 2023  |  abcactionnews.com
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first nation to start deep-sea mining, with its parliament considering opening a section of the Arctic Sea for exploration. The deep sea is rich in minerals like cobalt, crucial for the green transition to renewable energy technologies. However, scientists and environmentalists are concerned about the potential environmental damage, as the deep ocean's ecosystems are not fully understood and mining could lead to the destruction of these areas and the extinction of unique species. Despite these concerns, the International Seabed Authority has issued exploration licenses in international waters. More than 20 countries and several companies have supported a moratorium or ban on deep-sea mining until environmental protections are assured.

Norway at the Cusp of Deep-Sea Mining Amid Environmental Concerns

27 Nov 2023  |  wtkr.com
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first nation to start deep-sea mining, with its parliament considering opening a section of the Arctic Sea for exploration. The deep sea is rich in minerals like cobalt, essential for the green transition to renewable energy technologies. However, scientists and environmentalists are concerned about the potential environmental damage, as the deep ocean's ecosystems are not fully understood and mining could lead to the destruction of these areas and the extinction of unique species. Despite these concerns, the International Seabed Authority has issued exploration licenses in international waters. Major companies such as Microsoft, Google, and BMW have pledged not to use deep-sea minerals until environmental safety is assured. Over 20 countries support a moratorium or ban on deep-sea mining.

Trending stories at Scrippsnews.com

27 Nov 2023  |  wptv.com
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first country to engage in deep-sea mining, with its parliament considering opening a section of the Arctic Sea for exploration. The deep sea is rich in minerals like cobalt, essential for the green transition to renewable energy technologies. However, scientists and environmentalists are raising alarms about the potential environmental damage that could result from mining activities. They highlight the lack of comprehensive knowledge about deep-sea ecosystems and the possible extinction of species and disruption of services like fisheries and carbon storage. Despite these concerns, some countries and companies are moving forward, while others support a moratorium or ban. Major companies such as Microsoft, Google, and BMW have pledged not to use deep-sea minerals until environmental safety is assured.

Norway at the Cusp of Deep-Sea Mining Amid Environmental Concerns

27 Nov 2023  |  kxlh.com
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first country to start deep-sea mining, with its parliament considering opening a section of the Arctic Sea for exploration. The deep sea is rich in minerals like cobalt, essential for the green transition to renewable energy technologies. However, scientists and environmentalists are concerned about the potential environmental damage, as the deep ocean's ecosystems are not fully understood and mining could lead to the destruction of these areas and the extinction of unique species. Despite these concerns, the International Seabed Authority has issued exploration licenses in international waters. Major companies such as Microsoft, Google, and BMW have pledged not to use deep-sea minerals until environmental safety is assured. Over 20 countries support a moratorium or ban on deep-sea mining.

Norway at the Cusp of Deep-Sea Mining Amid Environmental Concerns

27 Nov 2023  |  fox17online.com
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first nation to start deep-sea mining, with its parliament considering opening a section of the Arctic Sea for exploration. The deep sea is rich in minerals like cobalt, essential for the green transition to renewable energy technologies. However, scientists and environmentalists are concerned about the unknown environmental impacts of such activities. They warn that deep-sea mining could cause irreversible harm to ecosystems and affect services like fisheries and carbon storage. Despite these concerns, some countries and companies are interested in the potential profits. Over 20 countries support a moratorium or ban on deep-sea mining, and companies like Microsoft, Google, and BMW have pledged not to use deep-sea minerals until environmental safety is assured. The International Seabed Authority has granted exploration licenses in international waters but has yet to decide on actual mining operations.

In Real Life: Mining the Deep Sea

26 Nov 2023  |  953thebeach.com
Norway is on the brink of becoming the first nation to start deep-sea mining, with its parliament considering opening a section of the Arctic Sea for exploration. The deep sea is rich in minerals like cobalt, crucial for the green transition to renewable energy technologies. However, scientists and environmentalists are concerned about the environmental impacts, including pollution and potential harm to ecosystems and species. They advocate for more research and caution in decision-making. Over 20 countries support a moratorium or ban on deep-sea mining, and companies such as Microsoft, Google, and BMW have pledged not to use deep-sea minerals until environmental safety is assured. The International Seabed Authority has granted exploration licenses but is still deliberating on full-scale mining.

Hong Kong's Experience With COVID-19 And School Reopening

06 Jul 2023  |  wuwf.org
The article discusses the challenges faced by Hong Kong in reopening schools during the COVID-19 pandemic. Initially, schools were closed due to the outbreak but reopened in late May when the situation seemed under control. Strict sanitary protocols were implemented, and schools received government support for safety measures. Despite no cases being reported within schools, a third wave of infections led to another early closure. The experience with SARS in 2003 helped Hong Kong to better prepare for the pandemic, with measures like mask-wearing and temperature checks already familiar to residents. The article highlights the efforts of various schools to adapt to the pandemic, including social distancing during recess and creative solutions for physical education classes. However, the recent spike in cases has forced the government to reconsider its strategy, and schools have been suspended again.

Hong Kong's Experience With COVID-19 And School Reopening

06 Jul 2023  |  boisestatepublicradio.org
The article discusses the challenges faced by Hong Kong in reopening schools during the COVID-19 pandemic. Initially, schools were closed due to the outbreak but reopened in late May when the situation seemed under control. Hong Kong's previous experience with SARS in 2003 helped the city to quickly adopt preventive measures such as wearing masks and temperature checks. Despite the precautions, a third wave of infections led to the early closure of schools again. The Education Bureau, along with schools like Maryknoll Father's Primary School and Tsung Tsin Primary School and Kindergarten, had implemented various safety protocols. The article highlights the efforts of educators and the government to balance the need for normalcy with public health concerns, and the collective memory of SARS has influenced the city's response to the pandemic.

Hong Kong's Experience With COVID-19 Offers A Cautionary Tale For School Reopenings

06 Jul 2023  |  wrvo.org
The article discusses the challenges faced by Hong Kong in reopening schools amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Initially, schools were closed due to the outbreak but reopened in late May when the situation seemed under control. Hong Kong's previous experience with SARS had prepared the city for stringent health measures, such as temperature checks and mandatory mask-wearing. Despite these precautions, a third wave of infections led to the early closure of schools, a week before the scheduled end of the school year. The Education Bureau's Secretary, Kevin Yeung, acknowledged the absence of confirmed cases in schools but emphasized the need to prioritize safety due to the recent spike in infections. The article highlights the various protocols and creative solutions schools implemented to ensure safety and social distancing, such as plastic dividers during snack time and alternative physical education activities. The piece concludes with the uncertainty of the situation as Hong Kong re-evaluates its COVID-19 strategy, while noting that there have been no school outbreaks to date.

Hong Kong's Experience With COVID-19 And School Reopening

06 Jul 2023  |  wyomingpublicmedia.org
The article discusses the challenges faced by Hong Kong in reopening schools during the COVID-19 pandemic. Initially, schools were closed due to the outbreak but reopened in late May when the situation seemed under control. Strict sanitary protocols were implemented, and schools received government support and guidelines. Despite no cases being reported in schools, a third wave of infections led to another early closure. The article highlights the city's preparedness due to the experience with the SARS outbreak in 2003, which led to a culture of mask-wearing and hygiene. The government's response, school measures, and the community's adherence to safety protocols are detailed, showing the complexities of managing education during a pandemic.

Back To School: How Hong Kong Reopened Schools — And Then Shut Them Again

06 Jul 2023  |  wglt.org
The article discusses the challenges faced by Hong Kong in reopening schools during the COVID-19 pandemic. Initially, schools were closed due to the outbreak but reopened in late May when the situation seemed under control. Strict sanitary protocols were implemented, and schools received government support and guidelines to ensure safety. Despite these measures, a third wave of infections led to the early closure of schools once again. The article highlights the city's preparedness due to the experience with the SARS outbreak in 2003, which influenced the public's quick adoption of safety measures such as mask-wearing and temperature checks. The article also describes the creative solutions schools employed to maintain social distancing and hygiene during the brief reopening period. The situation underscores the unpredictability of the pandemic and the need to balance normalcy with safety precautions.

Hong Kong Schools Face New Shutdown, But Students Had A Glimpse Of Normalcy

06 Jul 2023  |  wuky.org
The article discusses the challenges faced by Hong Kong in reopening schools during the COVID-19 pandemic. Initially, schools were closed due to the outbreak but reopened in late May when the situation seemed under control. Strict sanitary protocols were implemented, and schools received government support and guidelines. Despite no cases being reported in schools, a third wave of infections led to the early closure of the school year. The article highlights the city's preparedness due to the experience with the SARS outbreak in 2003, which influenced the public's readiness to adopt safety measures such as mask-wearing and temperature checks. The piece also describes the creative solutions schools employed to maintain social distancing and hygiene during the brief reopening period.

Back To School: How Hong Kong Reopened Schools During The Pandemic And What Happens Next

06 Jul 2023  |  wunc.org
The article discusses the challenges faced by Hong Kong in reopening schools during the COVID-19 pandemic. Initially, schools were closed due to the outbreak but reopened in late May when the situation seemed under control. Hong Kong's previous experience with the SARS outbreak in 2003 had prepared the city for stringent health measures, such as temperature checks and mandatory mask-wearing. Despite these precautions, a third wave of infections led to the early closure of schools, a week before the scheduled end of the school year. The article highlights the efforts of various schools to implement safety protocols and the government's financial support to ensure a safe environment for students. It also emphasizes the importance of the SARS experience in shaping Hong Kong's response to the pandemic.

Hong Kong's Cautionary Tale Of COVID-19 School Reopenings

06 Jul 2023  |  southcarolinapublicradio.org
The article discusses the challenges faced by Hong Kong in reopening schools amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Initially, schools were closed due to the outbreak but reopened in late May when the situation seemed under control. Despite stringent health protocols and no reported cases in schools, a third wave of infections led to another early school closure. The article highlights the extensive measures taken by schools, such as temperature checks, mandatory masks, and social distancing. It also reflects on the lessons learned from the SARS outbreak in 2003, which influenced the city's preparedness and response. The piece underscores the uncertainty of the pandemic and the balance between normalcy and safety, as expressed by Secretary of Education Kevin Yeung and various school principals.

Hong Kong's Reopened Schools Are Shutting Down Again Amid A New Wave Of Infections

06 Jul 2023  |  bpr.org
The article discusses the challenges faced by Hong Kong in reopening schools during the COVID-19 pandemic. Initially, schools were closed due to the outbreak but reopened in late May when the situation seemed under control. Hong Kong's previous experience with SARS in 2003 helped in early adoption of safety measures such as mask-wearing and temperature checks. Despite the precautions, a third wave of infections led to the early closure of schools again. The Education Bureau, along with schools like Maryknoll Father's Primary School, Tsung Tsin Primary School and Kindergarten, and others, implemented various safety protocols. The article highlights the efforts made by schools to adapt to the pandemic, including social distancing, sanitation protocols, and creative solutions for physical education classes. However, the recent spike in cases has forced the government to reconsider its strategy and suspend classes once more.

Hong Kong's Cautionary Tale Of Reopening Schools During A Pandemic

06 Jul 2023  |  wncw.org
The article discusses the challenges faced by Hong Kong in reopening schools amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Initially, schools were closed due to the outbreak, but as the situation seemed to be under control, they reopened in late May with strict health protocols. Despite no cases being reported within schools, a third wave of infections led to another early closure. The article highlights the measures taken by schools, such as temperature checks, mandatory masks, and social distancing. It also reflects on the lessons learned from the SARS outbreak in 2003, which helped Hong Kong to better prepare for the current pandemic. The government provided financial support to schools for safety measures, and educators adapted to new ways of teaching to minimize risks. However, the recent spike in cases has forced the government to reconsider its strategy, demonstrating the ongoing challenges of managing public health during a pandemic.

Hong Kong's Experience With COVID-19 And School Reopening

06 Jul 2023  |  wfit.org
The article discusses the challenges faced by Hong Kong in reopening schools during the COVID-19 pandemic. Initially, schools were closed due to the outbreak but reopened in late May when the situation seemed under control. Hong Kong's early success in managing the pandemic is attributed to the experience and lessons learned from the 2003 SARS outbreak. Schools implemented strict sanitary protocols, including temperature checks, mandatory mask-wearing, and social distancing. Despite these measures, a third wave of infections led to the early closure of schools, just a week before the scheduled end of the school year. The article highlights the efforts of various schools to adapt to the pandemic, such as Maryknoll Father's Primary School, Tsung Tsin Primary School and Kindergarten, Maryknoll Fathers' Secondary School, and Hong Kong International School. The Education Bureau and the Centre for Health Protection (CHP) have been closely involved in guiding schools on maintaining a safe environment. The article underscores the uncertainty of the pandemic and the need to balance normal life with health precautions.

Hong Kong Schools Navigate Reopening Amid The Pandemic

06 Jul 2023  |  aspenpublicradio.org
The article discusses the challenges faced by Hong Kong in reopening schools during the COVID-19 pandemic. Initially, schools were closed due to the outbreak but reopened in late May when the situation seemed under control. Hong Kong's previous experience with the SARS outbreak in 2003 helped in early adoption of safety measures such as mask-wearing and temperature checks. Despite the precautions, a third wave of infections led to the early closure of schools again. The article highlights the various protocols and creative solutions schools implemented to ensure safety, such as social distancing, plastic dividers, and hygiene practices. It also emphasizes the importance of the lessons learned from SARS in the city's response to the pandemic. The article is based on observations and interviews with school principals, teachers, and students, providing a detailed account of the situation in Hong Kong schools.

Hong Kong Schools Navigate COVID-19 Challenges

06 Jul 2023  |  wmot.org
The article discusses the challenges faced by Hong Kong in reopening schools during the COVID-19 pandemic. Initially, schools were closed due to the outbreak, but as the situation seemed under control, they began to reopen in late May with strict health protocols. Despite no cases being reported in schools, a third wave of infections led to the early closure of the school year. The article highlights the measures taken by schools, such as temperature checks, mandatory masks, and social distancing, drawing on the city's experience with the SARS outbreak in 2003. The government provided financial support for additional safety measures. However, the recent spike in cases has forced the government to reconsider its strategy, though there have been no outbreaks within schools. The article underscores the importance of preparedness and the cultural acceptance of public health measures in Hong Kong.

Back To School: How Hong Kong Reopened Schools And Why They Closed Again

06 Jul 2023  |  nepm.org
The article discusses the challenges faced by Hong Kong in reopening schools amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Initially, schools were closed due to the outbreak but reopened in late May when the situation seemed under control. Despite stringent health protocols and no reported cases in schools, a third wave of infections led to another early school closure. The article highlights the extensive measures taken by schools, such as temperature checks, mandatory masks, and social distancing. It also reflects on the lessons learned from the 2003 SARS outbreak, which influenced the city's preparedness and response. The government provided financial support to schools for safety measures, and educators adapted to new teaching methods. However, the recent spike in cases has forced a reevaluation of strategies, though no outbreaks have occurred within schools themselves.

Hong Kong Schools Face New Shutdown Amid Third Wave Of Infections

06 Jul 2023  |  hppr.org
The article discusses the challenges faced by Hong Kong in reopening schools during the COVID-19 pandemic. Initially, schools were closed due to the outbreak but reopened in late May when the situation seemed under control. Hong Kong's previous experience with SARS in 2003 helped the city to implement effective health measures in schools, such as temperature checks, mandatory mask-wearing, and social distancing. Despite these precautions, a third wave of infections led to the early closure of schools, about a week before the scheduled end of the school year. The Education Bureau's decision to close schools was made even though there were no confirmed cases in schools, highlighting the difficulty of balancing normal life with pandemic safety measures. The article also describes the various adaptations made by schools to ensure safety during the pandemic, including changes to classroom layouts, sanitation protocols, and creative solutions for physical education classes.

Hong Kong's Experience With COVID-19 And School Reopening

06 Jul 2023  |  wvxu.org
The article discusses the challenges faced by Hong Kong in reopening schools amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Initially, schools were closed due to the outbreak but reopened in late May when the situation seemed under control. Hong Kong had implemented strict sanitary protocols in schools, drawing on experience from the 2003 SARS outbreak. Despite these measures, a third wave of infections led to the early closure of schools again. The Education Bureau, with advice from the Centre for Health Protection, had provided guidelines and funds to schools to ensure safety. The article highlights the efforts of various schools, including Maryknoll Father's Primary School, Tsung Tsin Primary School and Kindergarten, Maryknoll Fathers' Secondary School, and Hong Kong International School, to adapt to the pandemic. The piece underscores the uncertainty of the situation and the balance between normalcy and safety, as Hong Kong navigates the pandemic without any school-related outbreaks so far.

Hong Kong's Experience With COVID-19 And School Reopening

06 Jul 2023  |  wuot.org
The article discusses the challenges faced by Hong Kong in reopening schools amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Initially, schools were closed due to the outbreak, but as the situation seemed under control, they reopened in late May with strict health protocols. Despite no cases being reported in schools, a third wave of infections led to another early closure. The article highlights the measures taken by schools, such as temperature checks, mandatory masks, and social distancing. It also reflects on the lessons learned from the SARS outbreak in 2003, which helped Hong Kong respond effectively to the pandemic. The government provided financial support for additional safety measures, and schools adapted to new ways of teaching and interacting. However, the recent spike in cases has forced the government to reconsider its strategy, though there have been no school outbreaks.

Hong Kong's Cautionary Tale Of COVID-19 School Reopenings

06 Jul 2023  |  wypr.org
The article discusses the challenges Hong Kong faced with school reopenings during the COVID-19 pandemic. Initially, schools were closed due to the outbreak, but as the situation seemed under control, they reopened in late May with strict health protocols. Despite no cases in schools, a third wave of infections led to another early school closure. The article highlights the measures taken by schools, such as temperature checks, mandatory masks, and social distancing. It also reflects on the lessons learned from the SARS outbreak in 2003, which helped Hong Kong respond effectively to the pandemic. The government provided financial support for safety measures in schools. However, the recent spike in cases has forced the government to reconsider its strategy, though there have been no school outbreaks. The article is written by Laurel Chor, a journalist based in Hong Kong.

Hong Kong Schools Navigate COVID-19 Challenges

06 Jul 2023  |  ctpublic.org
The article discusses the challenges faced by Hong Kong in reopening schools during the COVID-19 pandemic. Initially, schools were closed due to the outbreak but reopened in late May when the situation seemed under control. Hong Kong's previous experience with SARS in 2003 helped in early adoption of safety measures such as mask-wearing and temperature checks. Despite the precautions, a third wave of infections led to the early closure of schools again. The Education Bureau, along with the Centre for Health Protection, had provided guidelines and financial support to schools for implementing safety protocols. The article highlights the efforts of various schools to adapt to the pandemic, including Maryknoll Father's Primary School, Tsung Tsin Primary School and Kindergarten, Maryknoll Fathers' Secondary School, and Hong Kong International School. The piece is reported by Laurel Chor, a journalist based in Hong Kong.

Hong Kong Schools Reopen With New Health Protocols And The Shadow Of SARS

06 Jul 2023  |  weaa.org
The article discusses the challenges faced by Hong Kong in reopening schools amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Initially, schools were closed due to the outbreak but began to reopen in late May when the situation seemed under control. Hong Kong's previous experience with the SARS outbreak in 2003 had prepared the city to implement strict health measures in schools, such as temperature checks, mandatory mask-wearing, and social distancing. Despite these precautions, a third wave of infections led to the early closure of schools, just a week before the scheduled end of the school year. The article highlights the efforts of various schools to adapt to the pandemic, including Maryknoll Father's Primary School, Tsung Tsin Primary School and Kindergarten, Maryknoll Fathers' Secondary School, and Hong Kong International School. The Secretary of Education, Kevin Yeung, is quoted emphasizing the need to balance normal life with the spread of COVID-19. The article is written by Laurel Chor, a journalist based in Hong Kong.

Hong Kong's Reopening of Schools: A Balancing Act Amidst COVID-19

01 Apr 2023  |  wesa.fm
The article discusses the challenges faced by Hong Kong in reopening schools during the COVID-19 pandemic. Initially, schools were closed due to the outbreak, but as the situation seemed under control, they reopened in late May with strict health protocols. Despite no cases being reported in schools, a third wave of infections led to another early closure. The article highlights the measures taken by schools, such as temperature checks, mandatory masks, and social distancing. It also reflects on the lessons learned from the SARS outbreak in 2003, which influenced the city's preparedness and response. The piece underscores the balance between normalcy and safety, with insights from educators and the Education Bureau. Laurel Chor, a journalist based in Hong Kong, provides a detailed account of the situation, emphasizing the city's cautious approach and the importance of being prepared for emerging infectious diseases.

Hong Kong Schools Face COVID-19 Challenges With Early Closures Despite Precautions

01 Apr 2023  |  wuwm.com
The article discusses the challenges faced by Hong Kong in reopening schools amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Initially, schools were closed due to the outbreak but reopened in late May when the situation seemed under control. Despite stringent health protocols and no reported cases in schools, a third wave of infections led to another premature closure of schools. The article highlights the measures taken by schools, such as temperature checks, mandatory masks, and social distancing. It also reflects on the lessons learned from the SARS outbreak in 2003, which influenced the city's response to the pandemic. The piece underscores the uncertainty of the situation and the balance between normalcy and health safety, as expressed by Secretary of Education Kevin Yeung. Laurel Chor, the author, provides a detailed account of the situation, including the experiences of school principals and teachers.

Hong Kong Schools Navigate COVID-19 Challenges

01 Apr 2023  |  wvik.org
The article discusses the challenges faced by Hong Kong in reopening schools during the COVID-19 pandemic. Initially, schools were closed due to the outbreak but reopened in late May when the situation seemed under control. Hong Kong's previous experience with SARS in 2003 helped the city to implement effective health measures in schools, such as temperature checks, mandatory mask-wearing, and social distancing. Despite these precautions, a third wave of infections led to the early closure of schools again. The article highlights the efforts of various schools to adapt to the pandemic, including the introduction of new sanitary protocols and creative solutions for physical education classes. The Education Bureau and the Centre for Health Protection have been closely involved in guiding schools on maintaining a safe environment. The article underscores the uncertainty of the pandemic and the difficulty of balancing normal life with health risks.

Hong Kong Schools Navigate COVID-19 Challenges

01 Apr 2023  |  wqcs.org
The article discusses the challenges faced by Hong Kong in reopening schools during the COVID-19 pandemic. Initially, schools were closed due to the outbreak but reopened in late May when the situation seemed under control. Hong Kong's previous experience with SARS had prepared the city for stringent health measures, such as temperature checks and mandatory mask-wearing. Despite these precautions, a third wave of infections led to the early closure of schools. The Education Bureau's Secretary, Kevin Yeung, acknowledged the absence of confirmed cases in schools but emphasized the need to prioritize safety due to the recent spike in infections. The article highlights the various safety protocols implemented in schools and the community's adherence to these measures, drawing on the collective memory of SARS to explain the city's proactive response to the pandemic.

Hong Kong Schools Navigate COVID-19 Challenges

01 Apr 2023  |  whqr.org
The article discusses the challenges faced by Hong Kong in reopening schools during the COVID-19 pandemic. Initially, schools were closed due to the outbreak but reopened in late May when the situation seemed under control. Hong Kong had implemented strict sanitary protocols in schools, drawing on experiences from the 2003 SARS outbreak. Despite these measures, a third wave of infections led to the early closure of schools again. The Education Bureau's Secretary, Kevin Yeung, acknowledged the absence of school-related infections but emphasized the need for caution due to the recent spike in cases. The article highlights the efforts of various schools to adapt to the pandemic, including Maryknoll Father's Primary School, Tsung Tsin Primary School and Kindergarten, Maryknoll Fathers' Secondary School, and Hong Kong International School. It also touches on the cultural readiness of Hong Kongers to adopt preventive measures due to their SARS experience.

Hong Kong's Experience With COVID-19 And School Reopening

01 Apr 2023  |  wvtf.org
The article discusses the challenges faced by Hong Kong in reopening schools amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Initially, schools were closed due to the outbreak but reopened in late May when the situation seemed under control. Hong Kong had implemented strict sanitary protocols in schools, drawing on experience from the 2003 SARS outbreak. Despite no cases being reported in schools, a third wave of infections led to the early closure of the school year. The article highlights the extensive measures taken by schools to ensure safety, including temperature checks, mandatory masks, and social distancing. The government also provided financial support to schools for additional safety measures. The situation underscores the difficulty of balancing the return to normalcy with the risk of new infections. The article is based on reporting by Laurel Chor for NPR.

Hong Kong's Experience With COVID-19 And School Reopening

01 Apr 2023  |  wshu.org
The article discusses the challenges faced by Hong Kong in reopening schools amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Initially, schools were closed due to the outbreak, but as the situation seemed under control, they reopened with strict health protocols in place. Despite no cases being reported within schools, a third wave of infections led to another early closure. The article highlights the measures taken by schools, such as temperature checks, mandatory masks, and social distancing. It also reflects on the lessons learned from the SARS outbreak in 2003, which influenced the city's preparedness and response. The piece underscores the delicate balance between maintaining normalcy and ensuring safety during a pandemic.

Hong Kong Schools Navigate COVID-19 Challenges

01 Apr 2023  |  wyso.org
The article discusses the challenges faced by Hong Kong in reopening schools during the COVID-19 pandemic. Initially, schools were closed due to the outbreak but reopened in late May when the situation seemed under control. Hong Kong's previous experience with SARS in 2003 had prepared the city to implement strict health measures in schools, such as temperature checks, mandatory mask-wearing, and social distancing. Despite these precautions, a third wave of infections led to the early closure of schools once again. The Education Bureau's Secretary, Kevin Yeung, acknowledged the absence of confirmed cases in schools but emphasized the need to prioritize safety due to the recent spike in infections. The article highlights the efforts of various schools to adapt to the pandemic, including Maryknoll Father's Primary School, Tsung Tsin Primary School and Kindergarten, Maryknoll Fathers' Secondary School, and Hong Kong International School. It also touches on the psychological and logistical aspects of managing education during a health crisis.

Hong Kong Schools Navigate COVID-19 Challenges

01 Apr 2023  |  northernpublicradio.org
The article discusses the challenges faced by Hong Kong in reopening schools during the COVID-19 pandemic. Initially, schools were closed due to the outbreak but reopened in late May when the situation seemed under control. Hong Kong's previous experience with SARS in 2003 helped the city to quickly adopt preventive measures such as wearing masks and temperature checks. Despite the precautions, a third wave of infections led to the early closure of schools again. The article highlights the various safety protocols implemented in schools, such as temperature checks, mandatory mask-wearing, and social distancing during snack times. It also mentions the financial support provided by the government to help schools with additional expenses. The situation underscores the unpredictability of the pandemic and the difficulty in balancing the resumption of normal life with health risks.

This Ukrainian Soldier Uses Drag To Help Deal With The War

03 Mar 2023  |  huffpost.com
The article describes a drag show at G-Versace Club in Kyiv, Ukraine, where performers and attendees seek a respite from the ongoing war with Russia. The event features performances by drag queens and the Go-Go GIANNI Boys, with the crowd enthusiastically participating. Despite the war, the club maintains a sense of normalcy with weekend parties, adhering to a wartime curfew. Arthur Ozerov, a military volunteer and drag queen, shares his experience of becoming more open about his sexuality due to the war. He also discusses his efforts to support the LGBTQ community in Ukraine, which faces discrimination but is slowly gaining acceptance. The article highlights the contrast between Ukraine's growing acceptance of LGBTQ rights and Russia's repression under Putin's regime.

Reunion amid destruction, mass graves

13 Oct 2022  |  thenewhumanitarian.org
The article details the dire situation in Izium, Eastern Ukraine, following its liberation from Russian occupation on September 10. Albina Iliushchenko, a former sales manager, returned to her hometown to find it devastated, with buildings destroyed and basic utilities like electricity and water cut off. The World Food Programme found that 2.2 million people near the front lines need assistance, and with winter approaching, concerns are growing about survival in the cold. The UN estimates 18 million Ukrainians need humanitarian aid, with many areas still without power or gas. Aid organizations like the International Committee of the Red Cross and the Norwegian Refugee Council have faced challenges in delivering supplies due to ongoing shelling. The Ukrainian government is trying to restore services and distribute aid and pensions. Mass graves have been discovered, and residents who stayed are reliant on aid, with some having to barter for survival. Volunteer groups like Volonter68 are helping, but the scale of need is overwhelming. The article also touches on the resilience of locals, the importance of self-sufficiency, and the looming challenges of the upcoming winter.

From packed streets to silence: documenting the fall of Hong Kong

16 Jun 2021  |  theguardian.com
The article recounts the personal experiences of a journalist covering the Hong Kong protests against a proposed extradition bill in 2019. The bill, seen as a threat to the 'one country, two systems' principle, led to massive protests. The journalist describes the escalation of police violence and the subsequent descent into authoritarianism following the implementation of a national security law by Beijing. The law, coupled with the COVID-19 pandemic, quelled street protests. The journalist also reflects on the arrest of activists and the exodus of Hong Kongers to the UK, where they continue to protest, such as during the rally in Trafalgar Square and outside the Chinese Embassy in London. The article captures the resilience of the Hong Kong people and their struggle for democracy, even in exile.

Could Giving Kids A 50-Cent Pill Massively Boost Their Income Years Later?

13 Aug 2020  |  gpb.org
The article discusses a landmark study on the long-term benefits of deworming children in Kenya, which found that administering 50-cent deworming pills twice a year can lead to significant improvements in adult income and standard of living. The study, initiated by economist Michael Kremer, used a randomized controlled trial to measure the impact of deworming on children's health and education. The Kenyan government and various state governments in India have since adopted deworming programs, affecting about 150 million children annually. However, the study also revealed that the income boost was limited to men, with women seeing no economic benefit despite educational gains. The article also touches on the debate over the effectiveness of deworming, with some reanalyses questioning the original findings. Despite this, organizations like GiveWell continue to support deworming due to its low cost and potential high return on investment.

Hong Kong's Battle Against COVID-19 Surge

24 Jul 2020  |  gpb.org
Hong Kong is experiencing a significant surge in COVID-19 cases, leading to the implementation of stringent social distancing measures. The city, which had previously managed to reduce domestic cases to zero, is now seeing over 100 new cases daily. In response, officials have tightened rules, closing non-essential businesses and mandating masks in all outdoor areas and on public transport, with fines for non-compliance. Public gatherings are limited to two people, with penalties for larger groups. Carrie Lam, Hong Kong's Chief Executive, has warned of a potential large outbreak that could overwhelm hospitals. Despite initial chaos caused by a takeaway-only rule for restaurants, which was quickly reversed, the city aims to reduce case numbers through these measures. Hong Kong's strict quarantine rules for positive cases and close contacts have been a key factor in keeping COVID-19 numbers low. Epidemiologist Ben Cowling believes that the resurgence was expected due to the relaxation of previous measures and anticipates that the new rules will help reduce transmission.

January sale – get two months free

31 Jul 2019  |  spectator.co.uk
The Spectator is offering a promotional deal to kick off the new year. Subscribers can start 2024 with a special offer that includes two months of free access to The Spectator's content, both in print and online. This deal is positioned as an opportunity for readers to engage with the publication's content beyond the typical lifespan of New Year's resolutions, suggesting that the value provided by The Spectator will be a lasting one.

I did a live spot for Canadian news broadcaster CTV about the Hong Kong protests.

Hong Kong’s Next-Gen Protesters: ‘We Can’t Stay Out of the Way Anymore’

16 Jul 2019  |  WSJ
The article reports on a massive demonstration in Hong Kong, where nearly two million people took to the streets to protest against a proposed law. This law would allow China's judicial powers to extend into Hong Kong, which is a significant concern for the protesters. The demonstration marks the culmination of a week filled with protests that have significantly affected the city, which has a population of approximately 7.4 million people.

Beneath the surface of any Hong Kong protest lies the question of identity

06 Jul 2019  |  Hong Kong Free Press HKFP
The article discusses the role and experiences of ethnic minority residents in the recent Hong Kong protests against the controversial extradition bill. It highlights the city's identity crisis and the struggle of non-ethnically Chinese Hongkongers to assert their place in the community amidst the political turmoil. Interviews with five protesters of diverse backgrounds reveal a shared sentiment of belonging and a desire to fight for their rights and the future of Hong Kong. Despite feeling excluded and facing discrimination, these individuals express their commitment to the city and the protest movement. The article also touches on the risks faced by ethnic minorities during the protests and the complex dynamics of identity and solidarity in the context of the city's unrest.

Hong Kong protesters storm legislature, smashing doors and windows

01 Jul 2019  |  The Telegraph
In Hong Kong, a dramatic escalation occurred as hundreds of young protesters, many wearing masks and hard hats, forcibly entered the Legislative Council building. The protesters, some of whom were teenagers, used metal trolleys and poles to break through glass doors and open metal shutters, leading to a ten-hour siege. The situation ended with a confrontation involving riot police, who used batons, shields, and tear gas. Hong Kong's chief executive, Carrie Lam, held a press conference at 4am to denounce the violence and announce intentions to press criminal charges against the participants of the storming of parliament.

VIDEO : Thousands of protesters back on the streets of Hong Kong

21 Jun 2019  |  euronews
In Hong Kong, a significant number of protesters convened outside the Police Headquarters to maintain pressure on the government concerning a contentious extradition bill. The demonstration took place on Friday, signaling ongoing public dissent against the proposed legislation.

Hundreds of thousands protest in Hong Kong against extradition bill

16 Jun 2019  |  NBC News
In Hong Kong, a massive protest involving hundreds of thousands of demonstrators occurred on Sunday, demanding the withdrawal of a proposed extradition bill and the resignation of Chief Executive Carrie Lam. Organizers claimed nearly 2 million participants, while police estimated 338,000 at the peak. The protest remained largely peaceful, with demonstrators carrying white flowers and banners to discourage violence. The government issued an apology for the unrest caused by the bill. Lam had previously suspended the bill, but protesters are calling for its complete removal, especially after police used tear gas and rubber bullets in earlier protests. The demonstration reflects growing concerns over Hong Kong's autonomy under the 'one country, two systems' framework and its international reputation as a financial hub, with some tycoons moving their wealth offshore. The protest continued into the night, reminiscent of the 2014 pro-democracy protests.

Why Hong Kong Is Rising Up

11 Jun 2019  |  www.vice.com
Mass protests in Hong Kong over a controversial extradition bill have led to a temporary delay in its second reading. Demonstrations escalated when police used rubber bullets and teargas, injuring dozens. The bill, allowing China to extradite people from Hong Kong to the mainland, is seen as a threat to the region's semi-independence and autonomy promised under the Basic Law. Despite public outcry, Chief Executive Carrie Lam intends to advance the bill, while protesters and citizens express fear for their human rights and lack of trust in Mainland China.

The Myanmar military doesn’t want you to see where the Rohingya genocide took place

27 Aug 2018  |  www.vice.com
A U.N. fact-finding mission has accused Myanmar security forces of genocide, including indiscriminate killings, gang rapes, and village burnings. The report raises questions about the future of approximately 1 million Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh. Despite international calls for their safe return, Myanmar authorities deny the allegations and refuse to cooperate with investigators. VICE News gained rare access to northern Rakhine State, revealing the extent of the violence. The U.N. and human rights organizations continue to face significant barriers in addressing the crisis.

We spoke to North Korea’s lawyer about the assassination of Kim Jong Un’s half-brother

28 Jun 2018  |  www.vice.com
Malaysian lawyer Jagjit Singh, representing the North Korean embassy, discusses his role in defending a North Korean national detained after the assassination of Kim Jong Un’s half-brother, Kim Jong Nam, in 2017. The assassination, carried out using a nerve agent at Kuala Lumpur International Airport, has led to the trial of two women, Indonesian Siti Aisyah and Vietnamese Doan Thi Huong, who claim they were duped by North Korean operatives. The case highlights the North Korean regime's brutal tactics and raises concerns about the use of chemical weapons.

Evacuated Bali Residents Wonder If the Volcano Will Ever Stop Erupting

18 Dec 2017  |  www.vice.com
Mount Agung in Bali, Indonesia, has forced Farmer Wayan Kasih and many others to evacuate multiple times since September due to volcanic activity. With over 70,000 people in evacuation centers since the volcano began erupting on November 21, the community faces challenges such as reduced income from selling livestock at low rates and insufficient food supplies. Despite the risks, some residents, like Ni Ketut Purnama, choose to stay during the day to tend to their crops. Volcanologist Dr. Janine Krippner supports the government's evacuation efforts, recalling the deadly 1963 eruption. Residents remain in limbo, waiting for the time when it's safe to return home.

Rohingya Refugees are Receiving Official Identities for the First Time

27 Nov 2017  |  www.vice.com
The Rohingya, long denied citizenship by Myanmar and labeled as illegal immigrants, are now being officially recognized in Bangladesh. Over one million refugees are being registered, with identity cards now including the term 'Rohingya' after initial complaints. This registration effort, which aims to be completed by December 12, is crucial for providing aid and potentially facilitating future repatriation. The Myanmar government has historically denied the Rohingya citizenship, issuing 'National Verification Cards' that do not acknowledge their ethnicity, leading to widespread refusal among the Rohingya.

We Spoke to Rohingyas Taking Up Arms Against Myanmar’s Government

24 Oct 2017  |  www.vice.com
The Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army (ARSA) attacked Myanmar border posts and military camps on August 25, killing 12 officers, which led to a military crackdown causing over half a million Rohingya to flee to Bangladesh. The UN has labeled Myanmar's actions as ethnic cleansing. ARSA claims they are fighting back against oppression, while experts fear their struggle could attract international militancy. VICE News reported from Cox's Bazar refugee camps, featuring insights from ARSA members and a former major general of the Bangladesh Army.

Rohingya refugees face "catastrophe" after escape from Myanmar

16 Oct 2017  |  www.vice.com
Rohingya refugees are facing a dire humanitarian crisis in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, after fleeing a systematic campaign of mass killing, rape, and torture by Myanmar's army, described by the UN as having the hallmarks of ethnic cleansing. Over 500,000 refugees, 60% of whom are children, are living in overcrowded camps lacking basic necessities. Aid agencies warn of a potential catastrophe due to the spread of infectious diseases and severe malnutrition among children. The Bangladesh government, with WHO and UNICEF, has launched a massive oral cholera vaccination campaign. Despite efforts to improve conditions, concerns of a 'mega camp' and disease outbreak persist.
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