Lidija Pisker

Lidija Pisker

Roma, Italy


Available: Yes


Lidija Pisker

Lidija Pisker is a journalist living between Roma, Italy and Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina. She was covering stories from Bosnia and Herzegovina, Italy, Czech Republic, Finland and Belgium for the Center for Investigative Reporting (CIN) Sarajevo, Media Centar Sarajevo, Kosovo 2.0, Radio Free Europe and Euronews.

SKILLS

 


“You whore!” “I will kill you!” “Die!” These have become some of the most common words broadcast during prime time on numerous Bosnian TV stations over the last year, ever since reality shows have, as with so many places, become the most dominant programs on many media outlets in Bosnia and Herzegovina. But while many viewers enjoy them, some of them have raised concerns about their content due to their frequent outbreaks into violence and hate speech.


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Like many other young men of his age, 27-year-old Tomáš Pik enjoys going out with his friends and meeting girls. But having sex is more complicated. Friedreich’s ataxia, a rare neurological disease that causes movement problems, has confined him to a wheelchair for the past six years ago. Despite his lust for life, girls turn him down and prostitutes have hesitated to have sex with him. That is why he joined the Right to Sex initiative, which promotes sexual assistance for people with disabilities in the Czech Republic.


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Local activist Redzo Seferovic filed a lawsuit for discrimination against a café owner in his hometown of Zavidovici, Bosnia and Herzegovina, who kicked him out due to his ethnicity. However, two separate BiH courts, municipal and cantonal, dismissed the charges on the basis that discrimination could not be proved.


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Since 2011, the No Cash Day initiative in Italy has called for citizens to cast out their coins and pay by plastic. But in a country notoriously distrusting of electronic payments, is life with a bankcard even possible?


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Under the platforms of Rome's largest station, the hum of commuter traffic gives way to a different kind of sound. The Termini Underground dance studio helps integrate migrants into Italian society through hip-hop and breakdancing. While departing trains might shake the walls of the studio, it's the performers who shake it out on the floor.


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