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Lobato Felizola

Brasília, Brazil
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About Lobato
Lobato Felizola is a Brazilian journalist.
Languages
English Italian Portuguese
Services
Interview (Video / Broadcast) News Gathering Feature Stories
+4
Skills
Politics Current Affairs Science & Environment
+6
Portfolio

Rio favela builds biodigester and rooftop solar

10 Apr 2024  |  earthisland.org
In Rio de Janeiro's Tijuca Forest, surrounded by over 40 favelas lacking sewage systems, the Vale Encantado favela has built a biodigester and rooftop solar power system to address sanitation and energy issues. Community activist Otavio Barros, a member of the Vale Encanto Cooperative, spearheaded the initiative after years of untreated sewage affecting the local environment. With the help of Taboa Engenharia and the Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, the community designed a cost-effective biodigester and artificial wetland. The project, completed in 2022, employs local residents and aims to foster sustainable tourism and income opportunities. The cooperative also installed a solar power system to reduce electricity costs, hoping to inspire other communities facing similar challenges.

How a fishing village had to disappear from the map to make way for a wind farm in Ceará

04 Apr 2024  |  brasil.mongabay.com
In Camocim, Ceará, the fishing village of Praia do Xavier was erased from maps to facilitate the construction of the Central Eólica Praia Formosa wind farm by French company Siif Énergies do Brasil. The wind farm, operational since 2009, has significantly impacted the local community, which previously relied on artisanal fishing and agriculture. The community was not consulted, and their traditional way of life was disrupted by the construction and operation of the wind farm. Legal battles ensued, and the community received some compensation, including new houses. However, issues like food insecurity and land speculation persist. The case highlights the need for inclusive approaches and real consultations with affected communities in renewable energy projects.

Covid-19 Vaccine Scandal Could Be the Final Straw for Bolsonaro Supporters

04 Apr 2024  |  nacla.org
Brazil's handling of the pandemic, particularly the procurement of Covid-19 vaccines, has come under scrutiny with allegations of corruption and negligence within the Health Ministry. A parliamentary inquiry commission (CPI) has been investigating the government's response, uncovering evidence of overpricing and irregularities in the contract for the Indian Covaxin vaccine. President Jair Bolsonaro, who campaigned on anti-corruption, is implicated in the scandal, having been informed of the irregularities but failing to act. The scandal has led to protests, weakened Bolsonaro's anti-corruption stance, and may impact his chances in the 2022 elections. Despite this, Bolsonaro still has a strong following on social networks, which could influence his re-election campaign.

2,000-year-old carvings of celestial bodies and animals discovered on rocky cliffs in Brazil

19 Mar 2024  |  yahoo.com
Brazilian archaeologists have discovered numerous 2,000-year-old rock carvings in Jalapão State Park, Tocantins, depicting human footprints, celestial bodies, and animals. The findings, made during expeditions between 2022 and 2023, include 16 precolonial archaeological sites with engravings and red paintings, suggesting cultural connections and settlement patterns of ancient communities. The rock art, which may have been created using pointed stones and pigments from iron minerals, provides insights into the spirituality and way of life of Indigenous groups. The work, led by Rômulo Macêdo of IPHAN and commented on by archaeology professor Marcos Zimmermann, indicates technical and thematic similarities with other Brazilian sites, dating the art to around 2,000 years ago. Further analysis and excavations are expected to reveal more about the precolonial populations.

2,000-year-old carvings of celestial bodies and animals discovered on rocky cliffs in Brazil

19 Mar 2024  |  livescience.com
Brazilian archaeologists from the National Institute of Historic and Artistic Heritage discovered numerous 2,000-year-old rock carvings in Jalapão State Park, Tocantins, depicting human footprints, celestial bodies, and animals. The findings, made during expeditions between 2022 and 2023, include 16 precolonial archaeological sites with engravings and red paintings, suggesting cultural connections and settlement patterns of ancient communities. The rock art, which may be older than previously found stone artifacts, provides insights into the Indigenous groups' way of life and spirituality. Further analysis and excavations are expected to yield more information about the precolonial populations.

How a wind farm on Brazil’s coast erased a fishing village from the map

11 Mar 2024  |  Mongabay Environmental News
In Camocim, Brazil, the fishing village of Praia do Xavier was effectively erased from maps to facilitate the construction of the Praia Formosa wind farm by SIIF Énergies do Brasil, a subsidiary of EDF. The wind farm, operational since 2009, has caused significant environmental and social impacts, including restricted access, loss of fishing resources, and noise pollution. Despite legal efforts and compensation measures, the community remains dissatisfied. The case underscores the need for inclusive and consultative approaches in renewable energy projects, especially in sensitive environments.

Rio favela builds biodigester and rooftop solar

05 Feb 2024  |  Earth Island Journal
The article discusses the environmental challenges faced by the Enchanted Valley (Vale Encantado) in Tijuca Forest, Rio de Janeiro, where sewage was improperly disposed of, contaminating a local waterfall. A member of the Vale Encanto Cooperative, Barros, was motivated to seek solutions after a tourist was warned against bathing in the polluted waterfall. The cooperative is part of the Sustainable Favela Network, aiming for socio-environmental resilience. The article also touches on the history of Tijuca Forest, including deforestation for homes, farms, and coffee plantations since the arrival of the Portuguese royal family in 1808, and the subsequent reforestation ordered by Emperor Dom Pedro II in 1861 due to environmental concerns.

Bringing Back the Atlantic Forest’s Juçara Palm

05 Feb 2024  |  Earth Island Journal
The article discusses the decline of the juçara palm in southeastern Brazil's Atlantic Forest due to overharvesting for heart of palm, which was once a significant industry. The extraction of heart of palm, a popular food item, led to the endangerment of the juçara palm, prompting the Brazilian government to impose restrictions and eventually ban the practice. Despite this, illegal harvesting continued. The article highlights the efforts of Cooperfloresta and the Florestal Foundation, which are involved in agroforestry and reforestation programs aimed at reviving the juçara palm population. These programs encourage local farmers to harvest juçara fruits sustainably and participate in a circular economy that supports the repopulation of the species in the Atlantic Forest.

The Unthinkable Destruction of the Amazon

05 Feb 2024  |  Protean Magazine
The article by Lobato Felizola discusses the ongoing deforestation and environmental degradation of the Amazon rainforest, highlighting the role of the Brazilian government and private interests in facilitating this destruction. It outlines the history of exploitation in the Amazon, the impact of deforestation on biodiversity and climate, and the legislative maneuvers that legitimize land grabbing and environmental crimes. The article also touches on the international dimension, with U.S. corporations and financial institutions implicated in the trade of commodities linked to deforestation. The journalist criticizes the Brazilian government's lack of commitment to stopping illegal deforestation and the weakening of environmental agencies. The article concludes by emphasizing the dire consequences of the current policies and practices for the future of the Amazon and the planet.

10,000-year-old burials from unknown hunter-gatherer group discovered in Brazil

19 Jan 2024  |  livescience.com
Archaeologists in São Luís, Brazil, have uncovered an ancient Indigenous cemetery with over 40 skeletons and numerous artifacts, some dating back 10,000 years, which may represent a previously unknown ancestral community. The site, Farm Rosane, was discovered during preparations for a government housing program. The excavation, led by Wellington Lage, revealed human remains and artifacts from at least four different periods, including the Sambaquian peoples. The oldest skeleton, buried nearly 7 feet deep, was dated using optically stimulated luminescence, indicating a pre-Sambaquian population. Further analysis will be conducted by Beta Analytic in the U.S. The project, in collaboration with IPHAN and the Federal University of Maranhão, includes plans for a curation center, research lab, and museum to preserve and study the findings.

Ancient Amazonian Petroglyphs Exposed by Severe Drought

18 Oct 2023  |  livescience.com
The article discusses the emergence of ancient petroglyphs in the Amazon rainforest due to a severe drought affecting the region. These carvings, which could be up to 2,000 years old, have been exposed as the water level of the Negro River has dropped to its lowest point since records began in 1902. Indigenous archaeologist Carlos Augusto da Silva from the Federal University of Amazonas and Eduardo Góes Neves from the University of São Paulo provide insights into the significance and potential age of these engravings. The petroglyphs, located at a cultural heritage site known as 'Encontro das Águas,' have drawn attention to the skill and intelligence of the region's ancient inhabitants. The Brazilian Ministry of the Environment attributes the drought to factors including El Niño and climate change. The article also highlights concerns about the preservation of these archaeological artifacts as public interest increases.

Ancient Amazonian Petroglyphs Exposed by Severe Drought

18 Oct 2023  |  livescience.com
The article discusses the emergence of ancient petroglyphs in the Amazon rainforest due to a severe drought affecting the region. These carvings, which could be up to 2,000 years old, have been exposed as the water level of the Negro River has dropped to its lowest point since records began in 1902. Indigenous archaeologist Carlos Augusto da Silva from the Federal University of Amazonas and Eduardo Góes Neves from the University of São Paulo provide insights into the significance and potential age of these engravings. The petroglyphs, located at a cultural heritage site known as 'Encontro das Águas,' have drawn attention to the skill and intelligence of the region's ancient inhabitants. The Brazilian Ministry of the Environment attributes the drought to factors including El Niño and climate change. The article also highlights concerns about the preservation of these archaeological artifacts as public interest increases.

Bringing Back the Atlantic Forest’s Juçara Palm

01 Oct 2023  |  Earth Island Journal
Efforts to restore the juçara palm in Brazil's Atlantic Forest are gaining momentum through agroforestry initiatives and reforestation programs. The Florestal Foundation, in collaboration with local communities, is leading a project to repopulate the forest with juçara palms by harvesting and dispersing seeds. This initiative aims to create a circular economy, providing economic benefits to farmers while conserving the native palm species. The juçara fruit, which surpasses açaí in nutritional value, is being promoted for its health benefits and potential market growth. Key stakeholders include the Florestal Foundation, Cooperfloresta, and Vale do Ribeira Coopercentral, with significant contributions from experts like Artur Dalton Lima, Carolina Kors, and Gilberto Ohta.

9,000-year-old rock art discovered among dinosaur footprints in Brazil

19 Mar 2023  |  Yahoo Entertainment
Hunter-gatherers in Brazil created rock-art designs next to dinosaur footprints dating back to the Cretaceous period, as described in a study published in Scientific Reports. The petroglyphs, found at Serrote do Letreiro near the Valley of the Dinosaurs, were made between 9,400 and 2,620 years ago. The study, which involved middle-school students, noted the resemblance of the footprints to those of the rhea bird. The carvings, attributed to seminomadic groups, were made using perforation and scraping techniques. The proximity of the petroglyphs to the dinosaur tracks suggests that ancient humans were aware of and purposefully selected the location.

9,000-year-old rock art discovered among dinosaur footprints in Brazil

19 Mar 2023  |  livescience.com
Hunter-gatherers in Brazil created rock-art designs next to fossilized dinosaur footprints around 9,400 years ago. The petroglyphs, found at Serrote do Letreiro near Sousa in Paraíba, were likely placed intentionally near the prints, which include those of theropods, sauropods, and ornithopods. The study, involving middle-school students, suggests the ancient humans recognized the footprints due to their resemblance to those of the rhea bird. The carvings, made using perforation and scraping techniques, date back to between 9,400 and 2,620 years ago.

When record-setting rain fell in Brazil, responses varied between communities—and so did the number of lives lost.

16 Feb 2023  |  YES! Magazine
The article discusses the impact of record-setting rains in Brazil and the varied responses of different communities. Meteorologist Marcelo Seluchi of Cemaden explains the role of human actions in exacerbating natural disasters. Urbanization and climate change have increased the risk of landslides and floods, particularly in Brazil's Atlantic Forest region. The article contrasts the outcomes in Bertioga, São Sebastião, and Guarujá during the February 2023 rains, highlighting the importance of effective warning systems and disaster prevention plans. Guarujá's proactive measures, including social media alerts and Civil Defense actions, helped avoid fatalities. The Brazilian Federation of Geologists criticizes the negligence of administrations in managing risks. The article also describes a community project in Sítio Conceiçãozinha that successfully reduced flooding through environmental cleanup. Journalist Ricardo Lobato Felizola emphasizes the need for better disaster preparedness and community engagement to prevent future tragedies.

What Is the Future of Abortion Rights in Brazil?

01 Sep 2022  |  progressive.org
In Brazil, where abortion has been illegal since 1890 with few exceptions, a recent case of an eleven-year-old girl raped and denied an abortion has sparked outrage. Despite no legal gestational limit for rape-related abortions, a hospital refused the procedure, and a judge suggested adoption instead. The case highlights the diminished access to abortion in Brazil, contrasting with other Latin American countries that have decriminalized it. The article discusses the broader context of abortion rights in the region, the role of the Catholic Church, and the influence of conservative movements, while also noting the potential impact of recent setbacks in the United States on Brazil's abortion debate.

Controversial Brazil Environment Minister Resigns After U.S. Investigation

09 Jul 2021  |  Progressive.org
Brazilian Environment Minister Ricardo Salles resigned following a U.S. investigation into illegal wood shipments from the Amazon. The investigation revealed fraudulent schemes involving the export of illegally harvested timber, implicating Salles and other officials. The Brazilian Federal Police and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service played key roles in uncovering the corruption. Salles' resignation and the removal of Ibama president Eduardo Bim highlight the deep-rooted issues in Brazil's environmental governance. Joaquim Alvaro Pereira Leite, aligned with agribusiness interests, has been appointed as the new Environment Minister.

Vaccines and Vetoes: Tracking Brazil's Immunisation Fiasco (The Meridian Magazine)

Brazil's COVID-19 Vaccine Crisis: A Result of Government Inaction and Political Disputes

02 Jun 2021  |  Culturico
Brazil, once a leader in vaccination campaigns, has faced significant challenges in its COVID-19 vaccination efforts, resulting in a high number of deaths. President Jair Bolsonaro's government has been criticized for its handling of the pandemic, including minimizing the virus, promoting unproven treatments, and delaying vaccine agreements. The article details how Brazil missed opportunities to secure doses from pharmaceutical companies like Sinovac Biotech, AstraZeneca, and Pfizer, leading to a slow vaccination rollout and supply shortages. Political disputes and Bolsonaro's contentious relationship with China are also highlighted as contributing factors to the vaccine crisis. Despite these challenges, Brazil has begun its vaccination campaign with Coronavac, Oxford/AstraZeneca, and Pfizer vaccines, but the pace is slow, and shortages have led to the suspension of vaccination in some cities.

Brazilian Senate Bill Proposes to Restrict Legal Abortion Access

11 May 2021  |  Global Voices
The article discusses a controversial bill in the Brazilian Senate that aims to make legal and safe abortion more difficult, even in cases where it is currently permitted by law. The bill, presented by Senator Eduardo Girão, includes a proposal for a financial aid fund for rape victims who carry pregnancies to term and requires women to inform the father about the child, even if he is the abuser. Abortion in Brazil is legal only in specific circumstances, and the bill has faced significant opposition from feminist movements and reproductive rights activists. Critics argue that the bill is a conservative attempt to restrict women's autonomy over their bodies. The bill's rapporteur, Senator Simone Tebet, has indicated potential changes to the bill after widespread criticism. The article also touches on the broader context of abortion laws in Latin America, mentioning Argentina's recent legalization of abortion and the high rates of unwanted pregnancies in countries with restrictive abortion laws.

Bolsonaro Is Destroying the Amazon While Pretending to Protect It

09 May 2021  |  Common Dreams
Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro's speech at the Leaders' Summit on Climate is criticized for being a facade, as his administration's actions contradict his claims of protecting the Amazon. Environment Minister Ricardo Salles is accused of loosening environmental laws to benefit agribusiness, contributing to increased deforestation. Former environment minister Carlos Minc and environmentalist Carlos Bocuhy highlight the discrepancies between Bolsonaro's words and actions. The article underscores the significant deforestation and its impact on global climate, criticizing the Brazilian government's policies and actions.

For the World to See: Bolsonaro’s Failure to Protect the Amazon

05 May 2021  |  Progressive.org
The article discusses Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro's speech at the Leaders' Summit on Climate, critiquing it as mere posturing without substantive action behind it. It highlights the contradiction between Bolsonaro's promises to combat deforestation and the reality of ongoing environmental degradation in the Amazon. The article points out that Indigenous territories, which hold a significant portion of the world's biodiversity, are being blamed by Bolsonaro for forest fires, despite evidence to the contrary. It also covers the lack of new demarcations for Indigenous lands and the threats they face from land grabbers and deforesters. The article criticizes Environment Minister Ricardo Salles for his suspected involvement in covering up illegal logging activities and the subsequent budget cuts to environmental agencies, which undermine efforts to protect the Amazon. It warns that without real action, the Amazon rainforest could be lost, exacerbating the climate crisis.
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