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Mary-Rose Abraham

Boston, United States of America
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About Mary-Rose
Mary-Rose Abraham is a multimedia journalist with more than 15 years’ experience as an audio and video producer/writer/reporter. She is currently based in Boston. Previously, she was an independent journalist in Bangalore, India for more than seven years.
Languages
Spanish Malayalam
Services
Video Package (Web / Broadcast) Audio package (Radio / Podcast) Interview (Video / Broadcast)
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Skills
Current Affairs Science & Environment Arts & Books
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Portfolio

Podcast: Chaos at the Kumbh, and Other Stories of Pandemic Travel Restrictions

04 Apr 2024  |  thewire.in
The podcast episode from Scrolls & Leaves discusses the historical context of travel restrictions during pandemics, tracing back to the 19th century cholera pandemic and the British Raj's increased surveillance of Indians. It highlights the limited effectiveness and potential negative consequences of travel bans, such as stigma, restricted movement of healthcare supplies, and discouragement from disclosing illness. The episode, featuring surveillance expert Martin French from Concordia University, critiques the use of travel bans and suggests that investments may be better allocated to public health needs.

Tractor Rollovers Kill Dozens on Farms Each Year—and a Prevention Program Is at Risk

11 Dec 2023  |  civileats.com
Tractor rollovers are a leading cause of death in the farming community, and a rebate program for installing Rollover Protective Structures (ROPS) has been effective in preventing these accidents. However, the program is at risk due to a lack of funding, as it no longer qualifies for research grants. The NEC, which administers the program, needs at least $125,000 annually to maintain its operations. Advocates, including the American Farm Bureau Federation and the Association of Equipment Manufacturers, support federal funding for the program, ideally through the USDA and the upcoming farm bill. Despite the program's success and support, no legislation has been introduced to secure its future funding.

Millions of People Are Still Risking Their Health for Lighter Skin

01 Oct 2023  |  www.vice.com
The article explores the pervasive cultural bias towards lighter skin, particularly in India, and the health risks associated with skin-lightening practices. It highlights the efforts of advocacy groups like Women of Worth and campaigns such as Dark is Beautiful to combat this bias. The piece discusses the role of multinational cosmetics brands in perpetuating the demand for skin-lightening products and the dangerous health implications of using such products, including mercury and steroid creams. Personal stories and expert opinions underscore the deep-rooted nature of this issue, which is further complicated by historical, social, and economic factors.

Podcast: An Ancient Ayurveda Manuscript Unearthed in China

16 Dec 2021  |  science.thewire.in
In 1888, British officer Hamilton Bower discovered an ancient Ayurveda manuscript in the ruins of a Buddhist kingdom in the Taklamakan desert, China. This manuscript, written on birch bark in Sanskrit, links to India's medical traditions and highlights the historical significance of healing plants in trade, exploration, and the pharmaceutical industry. The Scrolls & Leaves podcast episode delves into this discovery and its implications for the history of medicine.

Ayurveda to big pharma: The wonder of healing plants

11 Dec 2021  |  Deccan Herald
In the 17th century, Hendrik van Rheede, the Dutch governor in Kerala, collaborated with Itty Achuthan, a renowned local physician, to create 'Hortus Malabaricus', a comprehensive record of the region's medicinal plants. This work was significant in the Dutch efforts to dominate European trade in the subcontinent. Centuries later, researchers seeking the original palm leaf manuscripts of Achuthan's family learned of their unknown fate. The Scrolls & Leaves podcast episode 6 explores the role of plants in medicine, exploration, empires, and colonization, featuring immersive audio.

Scrolls & Leaves | The lost port of Muziris

26 Sep 2021  |  Deccan Herald
Residents of Pattanam, Kerala, including Sukumaran K S, have discovered significant historical artifacts that suggest the village may be the site of the ancient port of Muziris, a crucial hub in the spice trade network with the Roman Empire. The Scrolls & Leaves podcast, hosted by Mary-Rose Abraham and Gayathri Vaidyanathan, explores these findings and other stories of trade and migration across the Indian Ocean, using immersive 3D sound to bring history to life.

Rare Indian Flower That Blooms Every 12 Years Under Attack by Farming, Tourism

26 Sep 2018  |  nationalgeographic.com
The Neelakurinji flower, native to Eravikulam National Park in Kerala, India, and blooming only once every 12 years, faces threats from agriculture, eucalyptus and acacia plantations, and tourism. The flower's habitat in the Western Ghats has significantly diminished, with a study showing a 66 percent reduction in grasslands over 40 years. Conservationists like G. Rajkumar from the Save Kurinji Campaign Council and academics like Jomy Augustine are raising awareness and calling for action to preserve this unique species and its environment.

The complicated ethics of being a dermatologist in a country where many people want whiter skin

25 Sep 2017  |  qz.com
The article explores the deep-rooted cultural obsession with lighter skin in India and other regions, highlighting the ethical dilemmas faced by dermatologists. It discusses the multibillion-dollar skin-lightening industry, the historical and social factors contributing to colorism, and the health risks associated with various skin-lightening treatments. Activists and organizations are working to change mindsets and promote inclusivity, but the demand for lighter skin persists, driven by societal pressures and beauty standards.

Dark is beautiful: the battle to end the world's obsession with lighter skin

04 Sep 2017  |  the Guardian
The article discusses the pervasive issue of colorism and the global obsession with lighter skin, highlighting the efforts of activists and organizations like Women of Worth to combat this bias. It explores the historical roots of colorism, its reinforcement through colonialism, and its perpetuation by modern globalization and the beauty industry. The piece also examines the harmful effects of skin-lightening products and treatments, both medically and socially, and shares personal stories of those affected by colorism. Despite the deep-rooted nature of this bias, there are signs of changing attitudes, particularly among younger generations and through educational campaigns.

Mosaic has now closed

24 Aug 2017  |  Wellcome
The article announces the closure of Mosaic, Wellcome's digital platform dedicated to long-form journalism about science and health, which was active from 2014 to 2019. The author expresses gratitude to the readers and contributors, including writers, editors, artists, photographers, and fact-checkers. While Mosaic has ceased operations, the article informs readers that some of its content remains accessible through the Internet Archive. Additionally, it directs readers to the news and reports section of the Wellcome website for ongoing stories and insights related to the organization's interests and funded research.

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Selena Gomez: ‘I’m Living in a Bubble’

19 Jun 2014  |  news.yahoo.com
Selena Gomez reflects on the pressures of her career and the need for personal time away from the spotlight. Despite her success from a young age, she seeks privacy and understanding from the public as she evolves beyond her Disney persona. Her recent trip to Nepal as a UNICEF Ambassador provided her with a new perspective, contrasting her life in the entertainment industry with the realities of those living in developing countries. Gomez is currently focusing on her career and has started piano lessons to improve her musical skills.

What Makes an Award-Winning Chef Nervous

18 Jun 2014  |  news.yahoo.com
Nancy Silverton, an award-winning Los Angeles-based chef, was recognized by the James Beard Foundation as this year's Outstanding Chef in the United States, becoming the first West Coast chef to win since 1998 and only the fourth woman. Silverton, who was a pastry chef at Wolfgang Puck’s Spago and co-founded La Brea Bakery, is known for her simple, fresh, and inventive cooking. Her culinary empire includes several restaurants named Mozza in California and Singapore. Silverton emphasizes the importance of both pizza crust and toppings, and she enjoys cooking for enthusiastic eaters, although she admits feeling nervous when fellow chefs dine at her restaurants.

Hulk Hogan Reveals the One Wrestling Move He Couldn’t Master

01 Apr 2014  |  Yahoo News
Hulk Hogan will host WrestleMania 30 on April 6 in New Orleans, marking his return to WWE and three decades since becoming WWE Champion. Hogan, who has had nine back surgeries, will not wrestle but will host and appear in storylines. He may induct Mr. T into the WWE Hall of Fame, acknowledging Mr. T's role in transitioning WWE to entertainment. Hogan reflects on his career, including his reality TV show, and expresses a desire to be remembered as a good man.

The Supernanny’s Amazingly Simple Solution to Tantrums

04 Mar 2014  |  Yahoo News
Jo Frost, known as the 'Supernanny,' discusses her seventh book on parenting, 'Jo Frost's Toddler Rules,' which focuses on managing toddlers, particularly during tantrums. Drawing from 25 years of experience and an incident on a Jet Blue flight, Frost categorizes tantrums into mock, situational, and emotional, and introduces the 'S.O.S.' method: Step back, Observe, and Step In. She emphasizes the importance of discipline in parenting, the need to honor and respect children, and the value of seeing the world through their eyes.

Cartoonist Al Jaffee Reveals the One Fold-In ‘MAD Magazine’ Wouldn’t Run

14 Feb 2014  |  news.yahoo.com
Al Jaffee, a cartoonist for MAD Magazine, is celebrating the 50th anniversary of his iconic fold-in feature. He began his career working with Stan Lee at the company that became Marvel Comics. Jaffee's childhood in Lithuania, marked by hardship, influenced his creative work. Despite being well past retirement age, he continues to work, finding pleasure in creating and knowing his work brings joy to readers.

‘Splash’ Star Kareem Abdul-Jabbar’s Career After Basketball: ‘For Me, It Was Necessary’

04 Apr 2013  |  news.yahoo.com
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, renowned basketball legend and star of ABC's 'Splash,' reflects on his multifaceted career post-basketball, which includes being an author, filmmaker, and cultural ambassador. Abdul-Jabbar, who still holds the NBA's top career scoring record, was named the greatest college basketball player by Sports Illustrated. He emphasizes the importance of a healthy athletic lifestyle at any age and values his achievements both as an athlete and in his personal life, such as raising his children and helping them attend college.

The Men Who Keep Oscars’ Secrets

21 Feb 2013  |  news.yahoo.com
Rick Rosas and Brad Oltmanns, accountants at PricewaterhouseCoopers, are the only two individuals who know the winners of the Academy Awards before the official announcement. They have been responsible for counting the ballots, a task PwC has performed for 79 years. The process involves high security and secrecy, with the final tallies sometimes being decided by a single vote. Rosas and Oltmanns have their own rituals and experiences with celebrities during the event, and they are the only ones who know the almost-winners of each category.

Extreme Global Weather: ‘the Unprecedented Is the New Normal’

01 Nov 2012  |  news.yahoo.com
Hurricane Sandy, dubbed the 'Storm of the Century', has caused a rising death toll, catastrophic flooding, destruction of neighborhoods, and billions in property damage in the United States and the Caribbean. Extreme weather events like floods, droughts, heat waves, and storms are expected to worsen globally, with every region facing deadlier and costlier disasters. This year, severe weather has impacted Africa with droughts and floods, the United States with the worst drought in 25 years, and Southeast Asia with Typhoon Son-Tinh. The IPCC attributes these events to human-caused global warming, population shifts, and poverty. Despite political debates, a majority of Americans now acknowledge the science behind climate change. Christiane speaks with Michael Oppenheimer, a Princeton professor and IPCC report author, about these weather extremes.

Police Officer Organizes Honor Guards for Fallen Soldiers at LAX

16 Dec 2010  |  abcnews.go.com
Officer Thomas Dye of the airport police has been organizing honor guards for fallen soldiers at Los Angeles International Airport since 2004. The ceremony, which is unique to most airports, ensures that every flag-draped casket arriving at the airport is met with respect. The initiative began after a fallen soldier's remains were returned without dignity, and was further inspired by the death of LAX police officer Tommy Scott. Dye, with 28 years of experience in the U.S. Navy and Army Corps of Engineers, trained his fellow officers in ceremonial and escort duties. The honor guard includes TSA officers, Army soldiers, airport police, LAPD officers, and FBI agents. Southwest Airlines and other airlines have become more vigilant in notifying Dye when transporting fallen soldiers' remains.
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